David Leask's Maddiston Pages

Muiravonside Parish, the way it was.

1700's

Muiravonside Parish through Newspaper reports.

1700's


1771

Caledonian Mercury 13th March, 16th March 1771

SALE of WOODS.

TO be SOLD, by public roup, to the highest bidder at the house of Muiravonside on Tuesday the 2d day of April next, betwixt the hours o eleven and twelve forenoon, The WOODS of MUIRAVONSIDE, consisting chiefly of Oak, with some Ash and Birch, all fit for any manner of country uses. The said wood lies upon the side of the river of Avon, within the shire of Stirling; two short miles above the bridge of Linlithgow ; and will be shown by Alexander Masson Gardener at Muiravonside, to any person that inclines to view the same, any day before the day of roup.

 

1774

Caledonian Mercury 27th June 1774

On Wednesday, the 22 instant, died at his home of Parkhall, William Livingston of Parkhall; Esq; His friends and relations will please accept of this as a notification of his death.

1793

Caledonian Mercury Monday 6th May 1793

ROADS IN STIRLINGSHIRE TO BE REPAIRED BY CONTRACT.

Notice is hereby given THAT the following LINES of ROAD are to TO BE REPAIRED by CONTRACT for the current year .

Linlithgow Bridge to Falkirk,

Camelon to Hollandbufh

Falkirk to Torebridge,

Holandbush to Kilfyth,

Torebridge to Banockburn Bridge,

Bannockburn Bridge to Stirling,

Kilfyth to Inchbellybridge,

St. Ninians to Auchinbowie,

Auchinbowie to Avonbridge,

Avonbridge to Loanhead.

Perfons willing to contract for putting thefe roads in proper and fuffiecient repair, may give in eftimates to Mr.  Thomas Wingate, writer in Sterling, for one or more of the divifions, as they may choofe, ftating however the feparate  expence of each divifion, as well as the mode they propofe for repair of thefe roads:-John Perry, near Loanhead, will fhew undertakers where materials have ufually been got for repair of thefe roads — and a general meeting of the Truftees is to be held at the house of Mr. Dearn, at Falkiik, on Thurfday the 16th of May, to receive and confider the propofals then laid before them; and it is expected that thofe interefted in the eftimates will attend for contracting with the truftees as they may determine.


1798

Caledonian Mercury 16th August, 20th September,26th November, 10th & 17th December, 1798

JUDICIAL SALE OF LANDS IN THE COUNTY OF STIRLING.

To be Sold, by authority of the Court of Session, within the Parliament of New Session House of Edinburgh, upon Wednesday the 19th day of December curt, between the hours of five and seven afternoon, THE ESTATE of MUIRAVONSIDE, which comprehends the Lands of Bowhouses, and part of the lands of Compston, situated within the parish of Muiravonside.— The lands  are capable of great improvement; and there is a seam of excellent coal, which, at a trifling expense, may be wrought to very great advantage. The Estate affords two freehold qualifications, and lies at the distance of two or three miles from Linlithgow. The mansion house with the orchard and planting (which is extensive, and in a very thriving state) is pleasantly situated on the Water of Avon, and is justly reckoned one of the most  ---------- beautiful situations in Scotland The farms are mostly out of lease. The lands lie contiguous, and there is a quantity of growing wood now fit for use, which may he sold at a considerable price.

From the Memorial and Abstract it appears the estate is divided into the following Parcels:

  1. — The LANDS and BARONY of MUIRAVONSIDE comprehending the Mansion-house and Mill of Muiravonside ; the free rent of which at present is 277 l. 8s. 6d. 2-12ths; but as the lands are mostly out of lease, it was therefore thought pro- per to prove what rent they would bring upon a nineteen years lease; and it appears, from the testimony of two witnesses, who have known the estate for many years, that the lands comprehended in this parcel, upon a Nineteen years lease might yield 256 l. 18s. 6d. 2-12ths Sterling, the upset price of which, as affording a freehold qualification, is 7450 l. 18. 1d. 4-12ths. The lands are held blench of the Crown, and the proprietor has right to the teinds.
  2. ll.— The LANDS of WESTER and MIDDLE BOWHOUSES, &c. The proven free rent of these lands, which are out of lease, is 31 l. 12s. 8d. but upon a nineteen years lease, they might bring 45,l. Sterling. It does not appear that the proprietor has right to the tiends, so that a 5th part of the rent will fall to be deducted on that account; and the upset price, after such deduction, is 1044 l. Sterling. The lands are held blench of a subject superior.
  3. 111. — The LANDS of COMPSTON. The present rent is 115 I. 10s., but on a nineteen years lease, they would be worth 91 l. 3s. 6d. Sterling. — These lands are held feu of -subject superior for payment of 10s. Sterling yearly. The proprietor has right to the tiends of part of the lands;— it does not appear he has to those of the farms of Newhouse, Easter and Wester  Draffins; but the tiends of the farms  are  valued, as instructed by a decreet of valuation in 1772.- The upset price of this parcel is 2644 l- I s. 6 d. Sterling. — The reason of the present rent of this parcel being higher than what would be got if the lands were on a 19 years lease is, that they were let formerly for pasture, but lately for tillage.
  4. IV.- SUPERIORITIES and FEU-DUTIES of the Iands of REDFORD, and Part of CANDIEHEAD. The annual value of these Feu-duties is 2 l. 2 s. 2d. 4-12ths Sterling. They are- classed with the above lands, in order to make up a Freehold Qualification, and the upset price is 52 l. 14s. 6d. 4-l2ths.
  5.  V.— WOOD growing upon the Lands of Muiravonside, BOWHOUSES, mid COMPSTON.—The value of the wood under sale, is proved to be 1037 l. 11s. 6 d. Sterling.
  6. Vl.— The COAL in the Lands of BOWHOUSES.— The Coal is not wrought at present owing to the  level being choaked up, but which might be set agoing at little expense; and it is proved, that after deducting that expense, this Coal when upon a 19 years lease, might bring 400 l. Sterling, which is therefore fixed on as the upset price of this lot.
  7.  VII. — SUPERIORITIES and FEU-DUTIES of COXHILL. These Superiorities are classed separately, as they make a Free- hold qualification. The Feu-duties payable out of these lands are 5 L 13s. 4 d. 5-12ths Sterling yearly, and the upset price, as affording a Freehold Qualification is 341 l. 14 s. 2d. 5-12ths Sterling. The composition for an entry of Singular Successors is not taxed.

The articles of roup, and a plan of the estate, with copies of the Memorial and Abstract, will be seen in the office of Mr. Jeffery, Depute-Clerk of Session, and in the hands of Mr. Keay, accountant, or Hector Macdonald Buchanan, writer to the signet, to whom intending purchasers may apply for further information.

 Alex Meason, gardener at Linlithgow, will shew the estate.

N. B. Since the Sale was advertised, an application has been made to the Court of Session for authority to sell the estate in lots ; in consequence of which the estate will be sold in two lots. The first, composing the six first parcels, and the second, the seventh parcel, being the Superiorities and feu-duties of Coxhill, &c so that any intending purchaser has thus an opportunity of purchasing a freehold qualification, besides the feu-duties, at an easy rate, while at the same time the purchaser of the first lot will have right to vote.

 

1799

5th January 1799

JUDICIAL SALE OF LANDS IN THE COUNTY OF STIRLING.

As last year

 

Caledonian Mercury 16th & 21st September 1799.

PRESERVATION OF GAME.

MR LIVINGSTON of Parkhall, requests that no Gentle- man will shoot on his Estates in the parishes of Polmont, Muiravonside, and Falkirk, without his permission in writing. The tenants have particular orders to pay attention to this. Poachers and other unqualified persons will be prosecuted

Caledonian Mercury 21st November 1799

Lands in the Parish of Muiravonside.

To be sold by private bargain

The following lands, lying in the parish of Muiravonside, and the shire of Stirling.

The Lands called Drumbroider, containing about twelve acres Scots measure, with a steading thereon, lying upon the north side of the road leading from Linlithgow Bridge to the West Bridge of Avon.

Likewise the LANDS called HOWLOAN, containing six acres, three roods, and thirty falls Scots measure, with a steading thereon, lying to the south of said road leading from Linlithgow Bridge to the West Bridge of Avon.

All the leases are expired; the purchaser may have immediate possession of the lands.

For further particulars applications may be made to Provost James Andrew, Linlithgow, or to James Aitken, writer in Falkirk, in whose hands are the title deeds, and who has power to conclude a bargain.

 

 

 

1800's

1800

 

Caledonian Mercury  Saturday 23rd  August 1800

STIRLING—

August 21, 1800. THE Sheriff-Clerk of the County of Stirling intimates to all concerned, that the MICHAELMAS HEAD COURT this year, falls to be held on Tuesday the 30th day of September next, at twelve o'clock noon, and that Claims are lodged with him for enrolling the Gentlemen after named, viz. 1. Alexander M'Leod, Esq. of Muiravonside.

2. Thomas Dunmore, Esq.

3. John Dunmond Napier, Esq. of Ballikinrain.

4. Lieutenant-General Sir Robert Abercromby of Airthrey, Knight of the Bath.

ALEX. DOW, Clk. Dep.

 

Caledonian Mercury  Monday 6th  October 1800

SALE OF GROWING TIMBER.

 To be sold by public roup, at Muiravonside, by Linlithgow, on Tuesday the 28th day of OctoberBETWEEN Seven, and Eight Hundred Ash, Elm. Oak, and other HARD WOOD TREES ; and and a considerable number of full-grown SCOTS PINE.Roup to begin at 11 o'clock forenoon, and cre---------- till Whitsunday next, on proper seen --------.

 

1801

Caledonian Mercury - Saturday 28th February 1801

SALE OF LANDS IN STIRLINGSHIRE.

To be SOLD by public roup, within the Royal Exchange Coffeehouse, Edinburgh, on Wednesday the 25th day of March next, at two o'clock afternoon, -

THE LANDS of GREENKNOW, or MUIRSIDE. in the parish of Muiravonside, within three miles of Linlithgow, and five of Falkirk, in the immediate neighbourhood of coal, and within four miles of extensive lime works. These Lands are inclosed and subdivided, and extend to upwards of 80 acres, all arable, besides about 8 acres in belts of planting, which having been formed upwards of twenty years ago, afford at present both ornament and shelter. There is an excellent Mansion-house on the estate, and also substantial Offices. The mansion-house which was built within these ten or twelve years, and cost e nearly 1000 L, consists of kitchen, hall, laundry, and servants room on the ground floor; a good dining- room, drawing-room, and two bed-chambers on the principal flat.; on the third fiat are four bed-chambers, and above is a large garret, which, at a small expence, may be converted into several apartments. A purchaser may enter immediately into possession of the mansion-house, garden, and about five acres oF grass, and to the remainder of the lands (which are let for two years as pasturage) at the term of Martinmas 1802.

At same time will be be Sold,

 The LANDS of STANDRIDGE, consisting of about 38 arable acres, situated also in the parish of Muiravonside, and county of Stirling, about two miles westward of Muirside, and nearly four from Falkirk. Both the above properties hold of a subject superior, for payment of small feu-duties, and the other public burdens are inconsiderable.

The title-deeds, articles of sale, and plans of the of land, are in the hands of Mr. Boswell, W. S. to whom or to Mr. George Cunningham, writer in Linlithgow, those wishing for further information may apply. Walter Gib, at the mansion-house, will show the lands, and point out the boundaries.

 

Caledonian Mercury - Saturday 2nd  May 1801

MARRIED,

 Yesterday, by special licence, at Lullingstone Castle, Kent, the seat of Sir Joseph Dixon Dyke, Bart. by the Rev. Marmaduke Lewis, Alexander Macleod, of Muiravonside, Esq. late of Jamaica, to Miss Dalmahoy, sister of the late Sir John Hay Dalmahoy, Bart.

FURNISHED HOUSE & GARDEN TO LET.

To be Let for such time as may be agreed to, GREENKNOW HOUSE, Furnished, with a Garden well stocked with Fruit, lying in the parish of Muiravonside, about three miles to the westward of Linlithgow. A Park containing about Five Acres of Pasture will also be let, if the tenant chuses.

For particulars apply to Andrew Cassils, Leith.

 

Caledonian Mercury - Thursday 13th August 1801

PRESERVATION OF GAME, &c. IN STIRLINGSHIRE.

HIS Grace the Duke of Montrose

The Earl of Dunmore

Lord Dundas

Lord Elphinstonie

Sir William Bryce, of Stenhouse, Bart,

Sir James Riddell, Bart.

Major-General Maxwell, of Parkhill

Mr. Dundas of Fingask, and his Guardians

Mr. Bruce of Kinnaird

Mr. Livingstone of Parkhall

Mr. Williamson of Polmont

 Mr. Stewart Nicholson of Carnock

Mr. Moerehead of Herbertshire

Mr. Cadell of Banton

Mr. Edington of Gargunnock

Mr. Drummond of Blairdrummond

Colonel Duncan of Glenfuir

Mr. MacLeod of Muiravonside

Mr. Ogilvie of Gairdoch

Mr. Lennox of Woodhead

Mr. Lennox of Antermony

Mr. Baird of Manuelmill

Wishing to prevent poachers and unqualified persons from destroying the Game, Fences, and Growing- Corns, on their respective Estates, hereby offer a Reward of ONE GUINEA to the informers, upon the conviction of each delinquent; and have empowered Thomas Wingate, writer in Stirling, as their joint agent, to carry on the necessary prosecutions, and to pay the said Reward.

Stirling, August 8, 1801.

 

Caledonian Mercury  Monday 12th October 1801

WINTER PASTURE, WITH A COMMAND, OF STRAW.

To be LET from October to 15th April

ABOUT Two Hundred Acres of OLD PASTURE, on which very little stock has pastured during the last summer. More than half of the marches is fenced with stone dikes, and it comprehends one inclosed field. It is well watered, and lies within half a- mile of the Drove loan, by Avonbridge, and about eight miles from Falkirk. Along with the pasture, the tenant will be furnished with a considerable quantity of STRAW, and be accommodated with a Court to put his cattle into at nights, or in severe weather, having shades on the north and east sides, open to the court. A more commodious place for wintering cattle is seldom to be met with, and its situation is very favourable for extensive dealers, carrying their cattle from the north to the south country markets.

For further particulars apply to James Thomson, at Couston, near Bathgate.

1802

Caledonian Mercury Thursday 25th February 1802

LINLITHGOW AND STIRLINGSHIRE HUNT

THE Members are requested to meet at the Hunt Inn, Linlithgow, on Monday the 1st March.

ALEX. MACLEOD Esq. of Muiravonside, PRESES.

.J. BOYD, Secretary.

 

Caledonian Mercury Thursday 26th & 30th August 1802

SALE OF LANDS IN STIRLINGSHIRE

To be SOLD, within the Royal Exchange Coffeehouse, Edinburgh, upon Wednesday the first of September next, at the hour of one o'clock in the afternoon (if not previously disposed of by private bargain) THE Following LOTS of LANDS, situated in the parishes of Muiravonside and Polmont, and county of Stirling:

LOT I. - Comprehending the LANDS of PANNIE, COMPTING-HALL MUIR, with the FEU-DUTY of the Lands of Wallace ridge.

II.-The LANDS of GLENHEAD.

III.-The LANDS of SNABHEAD.

IV.-The LANDS of GILMEADOWLAND.

 V.-The SOUTH PART of the Lands of Whiteridge.

The above lands are pleasantly and advantageously situated on the great road, and about half-way betwixt the towns of Linlithgow and Falkirk. They are all inclosed and subdivided, and consist of a good a and very improvable soil. The farm houses and offices are in the best-repair; and on Whiteridge there is an excellent Farm Steading, with thriving plantations. The whole of these lands abound in coal and ironstone. Both coal and lime are wrought in the immediate neighourhood; and as the grounds abound in freestone, buildings of every description, for which, there are many eligible situations, may be erected at a very moderate expence. The premises are out of lease, and the public burdens affecting them are inconsiderable.

For particulars apply to Michlael Linning, writer to the signet, St. James's Square, Edinburgh, who is in possession of the title-deeds, plans of the several lots, &c.

 John Graham, the gardener, at, Clarkston, by Falkirk, will show the grounds.

 

Caledonian Mercury Monday 20th September 1802

STIRLINGSHIRE. FARMS FOR GRAZING.

To be LET by public roup, for one, two, or more years, within the house of Mr. Turner, vintner, Falkirk upon Monday the 4th of October, at two o'clock in the afternoon, if not previously let by private bargain, THE FOLLOWING FARMS FOR GRAZING, viz.

I.-The FARM of GREENWELLS, comprehending 112 acres or thereby.

II.-The FARM of BURNSIDE, extending to 46 acres or thereby.

III -The FARMS of GLENEND and WEST MANUEL, extending to 102 acres or thereby.

IV. -The FARMS of WEST KNOWHEAD. CRAIGEND, and North Half of WHITERIG extending to 43 acres or thereby.

V.- The FARM of EAST KNOWHEAD, consisting of 43 acres or thereby. The above farms are very conveniently situated for grazing, being near the great road from Stirling to Edinburgh, and about half way betwixt Linlithgow and Falkirk.

As they are almost entirely in pasture, and in the natural possession of the proprietor, immediate entry may be obtained thereto. They are all inclosed, well watered, and sheltered.

As also, the Following FARMS for TILLAGE, on a Lease of Nineteen Years:

The FARM of NICOLTON, extending to 109acres or thereby. Immediate entry may be obtained to one half of said farm, and to the other at Martinmas1803.

PARKHALL PARKS with the ENTRY-HEAD, comprehending 122 acres or thereby- Entry Martimas1803. These two farms are also very advantageously situated as to the means of improvement, being in the  immediate vicinity of coal and lime, near the great road from Stirling to Edinburgh, and within four miles of Falkirk, Linlithgow, Bathgate, and Grangemouth. They -are also inclosed, subdivided, well watered and sheltered.Proposals, with the view to a private agreement, will be received by Thomas Livingstone, Esq. of Parkhall, at Clarkston, or Michael Linning. W. S. Edinburgh, to eitiher of whom application may be made as to further particulars.

John Graham, the gardener at Clarkston, near Falkirk, will shew the grounds.

LANDS IN STIRLINGSHIRE.

To be Sold, within the Royal Exchange Coffeehouse, Edinburgh, upon Wednesday the 24th November next, at two o'clock in the afternoon,

 I. THE LANDS of GLENHEAD, extending to 56 acres, or thereby. 

II. The LANDS of SNABHEAD, comprehending 82 acres, or thereby.

III. The South division of the LANDS of WIHITERIDGE, consisting of 86 acres, or thereby.

IV. The LANDS of GILMEADOWLAND, extending to 20 Scotch acres, or thereby.

The above lands lie in the parish of Muiravonside, and county of Stirling, and are very advantageously situated as to the means of improvement, being in the immediate neighbourhood of coal and lime, and only four miles distant from the market towns of Falkirk, Linlithgow, and Bathgate, and the sea port town of Grangemouth, to all of which they have easy access. The lands abound in freestone, and buildings of every description, for which there are many eligible situations, may, owing to the cheapness of materials, be erected at a very moderate expence. They are all inclosed and subdivided, well watered and sheltered, and consisting of a good and very improvable soil. The farm houses and offices are in the best repair, and on Whiteridge there is an excellent farm steadilng, with thriving plantations. The lands are out of lease, and the public burdens affecting them are moderate. They will be disponed to hold blench of a subject superior for payment of an elusory duty. For further particulars, apply to Michael Linning; writer to the signet, St James Square, Edinburgh, who is in possession of the title deeds, and plans of the several lands. John Graham, the Gardener at Clarlkston, by Falkirk, will show the grounds.

 

 

1803

Aberdeen Journal - Wednesday 23rd February 1803

EDINBURGH, FEBRUARY 19.

 The King has been pleased to present the Rev. William Macall, preacher of the Gospel, to the Church of Muiravonside, vacant by the death of the Rev. John Bertram.

 

 

1804

Caledonian Mercury - Monday 2nd & 23rd January 1804

ADVERTISMENTS & NOTICES

FARMS IN STIRLINGSHIRE.

To be LET for such period of Years as shall be agreed upon, and entered into immediiately,

THE following ARABLE FARMS situated in the  parish of Muiravonside, and County of Stirling,

1. NICOLTON consisting of 109 Acres.

2. WEETSHOT, consisting of 46 Acres.

3. HIRST and GREENWELLS, consisting of 82  Acres.

4. GLENEND, consisting of 113 Acres.

5. EASTER and WESTER KNOWHEAD  consiting of 124 Acres.

 6. BURNSIDE and PARKNOOK or Tappock, consisting of 41 Acres. -.

7. CRAIGEND, and part of whiterig, consisting of 80 Acres.

8. SNABHEAD, consisting of 89 Acres.

9. WEST MANUEL, consisting of 42 Acres.

The above Farms, (which will be allotted in what-ever manner offering Tenants may reckon most commodious, and sized accordingly), consist of a very improvable soil, are well watered and sheltered, inclosed and subdivided. They possess many local advantages, being situated in a populous Country, within a few miles of the market Towns of Falkirk, Linlithgow, and Bathgate, and within a mile of the great turnpike road from Stirling to Edinburgh. They also possess very favourable means of improvement. Coal of an excellent quality is wrought in the farm of Greenwells, and Lime can be procured at no great distance or expence. The Farm-houses and Offices are, in general, in good repair. For particulars, application may be made to the  Proprietor at Parkhall by Falkirk, or to Michael Linning, writer to the signet, St. James's Square, Edinburgh, to  either of whom offers may be transmitted in writing, any time betwixt (?) and the 15th of February first.

 

 

1806

Caledonian Mercury – Saturday  2nd August 1806

ADVERTISMENTS & NOTICES

COUNTRY RESIDENCE, STIRLINGSHIRE. to be LET FURNISHED, for Three, Five, or Seven Years, from Whitsunday next, 1807, THE MANSION-HOUSE of MUIRAVONSIDE, 1. OFFICE-HOUSES, LAWN, ORCHARD, and GARDEN, as presently possessed by John Smellie, Esq. This House is beautifully situated on the banks of the water of Avon, within three miles of the town of Linlithgow, and nineteen of Ediniburgh, is fit to accommodate a large family, the house consisting of dining-room, drawing-room, parlour, library, six bed-rooms, with, four dressing closets, servants apartments, &c. The furniture is new and fashionable, and the offices, which were lately built, are commodious and in excellent  condition, Particularly two coach-houses, stables for 12 horses, byre, &c. The Orchard and Garden are extensive, and well stocked with fruit trees, and there are many delightful walks out through the woods on the river side. The tenant will have an opportunity of being accommodated with grass in the adjoining parks. The House may be seen on Tuesdays and Fridays, from twelve to three o'clock, during the month of August; and for farther information application may be made to Mr. Macdonald, W. S. Prince's Street.

1807

 

Caledonian Mercury 22nd August 1807

To be Sold, upon Wednesday  the 18th of November  next, at two o clock in the afternoon, if not previously disposed of by private bargain, entire or in lots, as purchaser may incline.

 Parts and Portions of the LANDS of- Maddiston, with their Pertinents situated- ,in the parish of Muiravonside  and county of Stirling- .consisting of-S2 acres less or more, and Iying in the immediate vicinity of the village of Maddiston. The premises posses many local advantages. –A great road is about to pass through them, which will greatly  facilitate their intercourse with the towns of Falkirk, Linlithgow, and Bathgate, from which they are not above four miles distant.- They are well worth the  attention of persons desirous  of providing themselves with a house and a few acres of land. Immediate possession may be obtained. For particulars apply to Michael Linning W.S.E.

 

 

1809

 

Morning Post - Friday 7th  July 1809

C0LLIERY to LETT.—

The valuable and extensive COLLIERY of RUMFORD, upon the Estate of Parkhall, in the Parish of Muiravonside, and County of Stirling. This Colliery comprehends a very large and proven field of excellent Coal, possesses an extensive sale, is level free, works a good Seam of 3 feet, at a depth of from seven to eight fathoms only, is well roofed, will turn out any quantity of coal of the very best quality, enjoys the advantage of good roads, and is situated at a very populous and thriving country, being little more than four miles from the towns of Falkirk, Linlithgow, and Bathgate, and about the same distance from the sea-port of Grangemouth, and the Great Canal betwixt the Clyde and the Forth. The premises in particular are well worth the attention of an Iron Company as there is abundance of Ironstone upon toe Proprietor's Estate of the very best quality, and as the Coal has upon trial been found to be peculiarly adapted for furnaces. A Tenant may be accommodated on lease with whatever quantity of ground he may wish around the works. — Offers in writing, specifying fixed rent, or optional royalty, may be made to Alexander Livingston, Esq. of Parkhall, the Proprietor, at Clarkstone, by Falkirk; or to Michael Linning, Clerk to the Signet, Edinburgh. — Mr. Foster, at the Colliery, will shew the works.

 

1810's

1811

 

Caledonian Mercury - Saturday 4th May 1811

The Gentlemen of Stirlingshire,- at their late annual meeting, unanimously voted twenty guineas, to be paid by the County Collector, to Matthew Boyd, at Muiravonside, as a testimony of their approbation of the great activity and exertion, successfully used by him, in pursuing, apprehending, and bringing to justice, two men, who had robbed him in the Sheriffmuir, of a large sum of money.

1812

 

Caledonian Mercury - Monday 22nd June 1812

Advertisements & Notices

NOTICE TO THE NEAREST OF KIN. –

ALEXANDER MEASON, late Gardener at Muiravonside, in the parish of Muiravonside, and county of Stirling, having died intestate, the Rev. WILLIAM MCCALL, of Muiravonside, took the charge of his funeral and the management of his affairs, said there being a small balance in his hands, after payment of the necessary expenses, he hereby requires such persons as have an interest therein, to make application to him, within two months from this date, shewing their relationship, with a title to discharge; certifying that those who do not make such application will be cut off from any  division of the funds.

Muiravonside, June19, 1812.

 

Caledonian Mercury - Saturday 12th December 1812

FOR SALE, PROPERTIES AND SUPERIORITY IN THE COUNTIES OF LINLITHGOW AND STIRLING,

Being part of the Sequestrated Estate of THOMAS DOUGLAS, of Easter Inch.

There will be exposed to public SALE, within the Royal Exchange Coffeehouse, Edinburgh, on Wednesday the 13th day of January next, at one o'clock afternoon, THE said PROPERTIES and SUPERIORITY, in the lots after-mentioned, viz.-

Lot. I .-

The LANDS, called the EASTER INCH of BATHGATE, lying in the parish of Bathgate, and county of Linlihgow, and containing, of Scots Acre.

Arable Land. - - -         120  14

Pasture and Moss - - -  22    7

Planting - - -                      1    7

In all                              144  54.

Lot II-

The LANDS of WESTER INCH, lying in the parish and county foresaid, and containing 69 acres 146 dec.  Scots of arable, and 34 acres 26 dec. of pasture land, making together 103,406 acres. –

Lot III.-

The, FREEHOLD SUPERIORITY of certain parts of The Barony of BLACKBURN, lying in the county of  Linlithgow, to the extent of L.417 14s. 4d. 9-12ths Scots, in virtue of which Mr. Douglas is already on the roll

Lot IV.-

PART of the LANDS of FALSIDE, to the extent of 24 acres 2 roods 6 falls Scots.-

Lot V.-

SUNDRY HOUSES, forming one large tenement, in the centre of the town of Bathgate, yielding at present about L. 16 of yearly rents.  –

Lot VI. –

A PORTION of LAND, consisting of 1461 feet in length, and 72 feet in breadth, with the houses built thereon, lying along the great Fall road through the village of Blackburn in the parish of Livingstone, and county of Linlithgow, and immediately adjacent to the said village..

Lot.VII –

THE LANDS of CRAIGMAILAN, or WEST  FIELD LANDS of TARTRAVEN, lying in the parish of, and about three miles from Linlithgow.

Lot VIII. –

 The LANDS of KENDIESHILL, being part of the Lands of Greenknows, or Muir-edge, lying in the parish of Muiravonside, and county of Stirling, and about four miles from the towns of Linlithgow and Falkirk. This property contains 48 acres 20 falls of arable land, and 4 acres 2 roods 24 falls in plantations, making in all 52 acres 2 roods 4 falls Scots. The lands are all in old grass, and are subdivided into inclosures with hedges and stripes of thriving planting. They contain valuable seams of coal and ironstone, which have been wrought for some time by the proprietor to great advantage. The vicinity of the Carron Company's Iron works renders the latter mineral an object of peculiar interest - There is a commodious new dwelling-house upon the premises, and the public burdens are trifling.

Further particulars regarding these properties may be learned by application to James Brown, accountant in Edinburgh, the trustee who is in possession of the title-deeds and plans; or to Thomas Darling, writer, Union Street.

59. George Street, Nov. 25 1812.

1813

 

Caledonian Mercury - Saturday 2nd  9th January 1813

FOR SALE, PROPERTIES AND SUPERIORITY IN THE COUNTIES OF LINLITHGOW AND STIRLING,

Being part of the Sequestrated Estate of THOMAS DOUGLAS, of Easter Inch.

There will be exposed to public SALE, within the Royal Exchange Coffeehouse, Edinburgh, on Wednesday the 13th day of January next, at one o'clock afternoon, THE said PROPERTIES and SUPERIORITY, in the lots after-mentioned, viz.-

Lot. I .-

The LANDS, called the EASTER INCH of BATHGATE, lying in the parish of Bathgate, and county of Linlihgow, and containing, of Scots Acre.

Arable Land. - - -         120  14

Pasture and Moss - - -  22    7

Planting - - -                      1    7

In all                              144  54.

Lot II-

The LANDS of WESTER INCH, lying in the parish and county foresaid, and containing 69 acres 146 dec.  Scots of arable, and 34 acres 26 dec. of pasture land, making together 103,406 acres. –

Lot III.-

The, FREEHOLD SUPERIORITY of certain parts of The Barony of BLACKBURN, lying in the county of  Linlithgow, to the extent of L.417 14s. 4d. 9-12ths Scots, in virtue of which Mr. Douglas is already on the roll

Lot IV.-

PART of the LANDS of FALSIDE, to the extent of 24 acres 2 roods 6 falls Scots.-

Lot V.-

SUNDRY HOUSES, forming one large tenement, in the centre of the town of Bathgate, yielding at present about L. 16 of yearly rents.  –

Lot VI. –

A PORTION of LAND, consisting of 1461 feet in length, and 72 feet in breadth, with the houses built thereon, lying along the great Fall road through the village of Blackburn in the parish of Livingstone, and county of Linlithgow, and immediately adjacent to the said village..

Lot.VII –

THE LANDS of CRAIGMAILAN, or WEST  FIELD LANDS of TARTRAVEN, lying in the parish of, and about three miles from Linlithgow.

Lot VIII. –

 The LANDS of KENDIESHILL, being part of the Lands of Greenknows, or Muir-edge, lying in the parish of Muiravonside, and county of Stirling, and about four miles from the towns of Linlithgow and Falkirk. This property contains 48 acres 20 falls of arable land, and 4 acres 2 roods 24 falls in plantations, making in all 52 acres 2 roods 4 falls Scots. The lands are all in old grass, and are subdivided into inclosures with hedges and stripes of thriving planting. They contain valuable seams of coal and ironstone, which have been wrought for some time by the proprietor to great advantage. The vicinity of the Carron Company's Iron works renders the latter mineral an object of peculiar interest - There is a commodious new dwelling-house upon the premises, and the public burdens are trifling.

Further particulars regarding these properties may be learned by application to James Brown, accountant in Edinburgh, the trustee who is in possession of the title-deeds and plans; or to Thomas Darling, writer, Union Street.

59. George Street, Nov. 25 1812.


Caledonian Mercury - Saturday 17th April 1813

Advertisements & Notices

LAND FOR SALETHE LANDS of GREENKNOW, HOUSE, OFFICES, &c.

containing 29 acres, 1 rood, and 19 falls, Scotch measure, situated in the parish of Muiravonside, and county of Stirling. Distant about 20 miles from Edinburgh, 4 from Linlithgow, and 5 from Falkirk. The ground is all inclosed and subdivided into six inclosures, the whole being surrounded with belts of wood of a considerable age, which afford both shelter and ornament to the property. The lands are all in pasture grass, and Let until Christmas next. The mansion house is substantial, commodious, and fit for the accommodation of a large family; the sunk storey contains kitchen, washing room, servants room, and other apartlnents. The first floor, dining, and drawing-rooms, and two bed-rooms. The second floor, four bed-rooms, closet, &c. And the attic storey, sleeping apartments for servants. The offices suitable to the property. A large garden inclosed by a stone wall, eight feet high, stocked with fruit trees. The public burdens are very trifling. The house, garden and offices may be entered to immediately. To be sold by public roup, in the Royal Exchange Coffee house, on Wednesday the 12th: day of May 1813, at two o clock afternoon; proposed upset price, L. 2000 Sterling. For particulars apply to Mr. Brown, Fountainbridge, Edinburgh, or Mr. Gray, solicitor at law, 10, Hanover Street, in whose hands the title deeds are. 16th April 1813.

 

Caledonian Mercury - Thursday 29th April 1813

STlRLINGSHIRE TAXES

 THE COLLECTOR requests immediate payment at the CESS OFFICE, Stirling, of the following Duties and taxes, now due : -  LAND TAX, BRIDGE MONEY, &C. for 1812.  MILITIA FAMILIES Relief Assessment, for 1812, of 16s. Steling per L.100 Scots of land, or L.12 Sterling of House Rents, and all preceding Arrears. If the above Duties are not paid directly, persons will have themselves to blame, for the compulsory measures which the Collector must otherwise unavoidably adopt. Cess Office, Stirling, 15th April 1813.

The PROPERTY DUTY and ASSESSED TAXES of the County, Being in future to be collected by Sub-Collecrtors. These Duties for all the Parishes of the  County (except the Falkirk District) must be paid immediately to Mr. WINGATE, at STIRLING Who Entreats the utmost punctuality from those concerned, to the orders of the Court of Exchequer, under the late statutes, for diligence being enforced, regarding all arrears, are urgent and premptery.

N.B. - The Property and Assessed Taxes for the parishes of

AIRTH,

BOTHKENNAR,

FALKIRK

 MUIRAVONSIDE,

POLMONT, and

SLAMANNAN

to be paid to the Sub-Collector at Falkirk.

 

Caledonian Mercury - Thursday 27th May 1813

TO BE SOLD BY PRIVATE BARGAIN,

Altogether, or in lots, as purchasers incline,

ABOUT TWENTY ACRES of LAND, all arable, and capable of great improvement, being south lying land, well waterstead with springs, and are part of the ten shilling lands of Blackstone, and ten pound lands of Ballenbrech, and certain parts of Muiravonside Muir, now called Heather Stacks, and Houses thereupon, all belonging to Allan, Mair, and with such teinds and servitudes thereof as belong to the proprietor, all lying in the old Barony of Callander, and shire of Stirling. Lime and coal are not distant more than three miles. The lands are situated about an equal distance from the market towns of Liniithgow, Falkirk, and Bathgate. The public and parochial burdens are trifling.

For particulars apply to the said Allan Mair, residing on the lands; or to John MacIsaac, at Mr. Foreman's, W. S. 15, Catharine Street, Edinburgh.

 

Manchester Mercury -  Tuesday 20th July 1813

On Sunday afternoon, was a dreadful storm of thunder, lightning, and hail, at Falkirk and its neighbourhood, which continued without intermission from four till six o'clock. In Falkirk, a house was struck the lightning, and received considerable damage, and the and iron and tin articles in the house thrown about, but no person within was injured; it also unroofed a byre and struck a boy, who is deprived the use of one of his sides, but he is recovering. Six persons returning from Avon-bridge sacrament were knocked down hy the lightning, but so far recovered as to be able to walk home, some of have, however, been since confined to their beds with swollen legs.

 

Caledonian Mercury - Thursday 23rd September 1813

Advertisements & Notices

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT application is intended to be made to Parliament, In the next Session for leave to bring in a bill for making and maintaining a, NAVIGBLE CANAL from at or near the TOWN of FALKIRK, in the county of Stirling, to the CITY of EDINBURGH, in county of Edinburgh, to join the Forth and  Clyde Navigation; at or near Lock No. 16, and. thence to or near to the town of Falkirk, both in the parish of Falkirk, to or near to the village of Redding and the Brighton Stone Quarries, in the parish of Polmont near to the Kirk and Manse of Muiravonside, and near Manuel Mill, in the parish of Muirvonside, all in the county of Stirling – and etc etc.

1815

Caledonian Mercury - Thursday 28th September 1815

EDINBURGH AND GLASGOW CANAL.

NOTCE is hereby given, that application is intended to be made, during the ensuing Session ot Parliament, for leave to bring in a Bill for making and maintaining a NAVIGABLE CANAL, from the Monkland Canal, at or near lomimir - nook, in the parish of Old Monkland, and county ofLanark, to the city of Edinburgh, and which Navigable Canal  will pass through the parishes of Old and New Monkland, in county of Lanark, Cumbernauld, in the county of Dumbarton; Falkirk, Polmont, and Muiravonside, in the county of Stirlng; Linlithgow, Ecclesmachan, Abercorn, Dalmeny, the Earlston, and Uphall, in the counly of Linlithgow;. Ratho, Nidrie, Callington, and St. Cuthberts, in the county of Midlothian:And also, for power to extend the said Canal from Edinburgh to the Wet Docks Leith, through the parishes ofSt. Cuthbert's, Canongate, North and South Leith, in the county of Mid Lothian, provided the necessary subscriptions are obtained for such extension.

1817

Caledonian Mercury - Saturday 16th  August 1817

Advertisements & Notices

ESTATE IN STIRLINGSHIREWITH A FREEHSOLD QUALIFICATION.

To be Sold by private bargain,

THE ESTATE of MUIRAVONSIDE, in The county of Stirling, consisting of above 500 acres beautifully situated on the banks of the Avon, about three miles from Linlithgow, five from Falkirk, and 16 from Stirling. This property has been highly improved and embellished, the plantations are thriving and tastefully disposed, and the mansion-house is delightfully situated in the sheltred vale of the wooded banks of the Avon. A more desirable country residence seldom presents itself. A large proportion of the price will be allowed to remain in the purchaser's hands on security of the property.

 For further particulars application may be made to Michael Linning and M. N. Macdonald, clerk to the signet, at their chambers 20, Hill Street, Edinburgh, 8th August 1817.

 

Caledonian Mercury - Thursday 2nd 16th 23rd October 1817

Advertisements & Notices

BEAUTIFUL ESTATE IN STIRLINGSHIRE.

To, be SOLD by private bargain,

THE ESTATE of MUIRAVONSIDE, described in former advertisements.

For particulars apply to Michael Linning and M. N. Macdonald, Clerks to the signet, at their chambers, 20, Hill Street, Edinburgh.

Edinburgh, 30th Sept. 1817.

 

Caledonian Mercury - Thursday 9th October 1817

Advertisements & Notices

SALE OF HERITABLE PROPERTY IN THE COUNTIES OF LINLITHGOW AND STRLING,

AND

AN EXTENSIVE BREWERY,

 Being part of the Sequestrated Estate of Mr. THOMAS ANDREW of Gillandersland, Brewer in Linlithgow, To be peremptorily SOLD, by public roup, within McKenzie's Inn, Linlithgow, upon Friday the 7th day of November I817, at 12 o'clock noon,

 I.- THAT Extensive and  commodious BREWERY, situated in the burgh of Linlithgow, lately occupied by Mr. Andrew, and now by the trustees on his estate, with the brewing utensils, malt barns, granaries, and other, houses thereto attached; and the large adjoining DWELLING.HOUSE and Garden, presently possessed by Mr. Andrew. This property highly merits the attention of a person of capital, desirous of carrying on a brewery on an extensive scale, for which it possesses many peculiar advantages; and in order that a purchaser may enter with all the benefits arising from the business which has been long established, it will be continued by the trustee on Mr. Andrew's estate, until the purchaser assume possession, which may be immediately after the sale.

 II.-. That GARDEN on the south side of the road leading by the back of the town of Linlithgow, called the PLUMB containing an acre of land or thereby, well stocked with fruit trees.

III.-The CROWN INN of LINLITHGOW, with the  stables and garden thereto belonging, as presently possessed by James McFarlane, lying at the west end of the town, on the north side of the High Street IV.-That DWELLING HOUSE lying near the west end of the burgh, upon the south side of said street, presently possessed by John Taylor, weaver, and others.

 V.-The LEASE of the FARM of PARKHEAD lying on the north side of the loch of Linlithgow, of which there are 21 years to run after Martinmas next. It contains about110 acres of land, of good soil, in excellent condition and quite adapted for any method of cropping. The present rent is only, L.90, and the vicinity of the farm to Linlithgow and the sea port of Borrowstounness confers on it many advantages. The purchaser's entry will take place immediately after the sale. A new thrashing machine on the farm, of six horsepower, on the most improved principles, will also be sold at same time.

VI-All and Whole the FARM and LANDS of GILANDERSLAND and CABERTOWN, lying in the parish  of Muiravonside and shire of Stirling, consisting of 70 acres or thereby, as lately possessed by Mr. Andrew, situated within four miles of the towns of Linlithgow and Falkirk, and  within a quarter of a mile of the line of the Union Canal. - There is an excellent thrashing machine on the lands, lately erected.

VII.-All and whole the LANDS of GREENKNOW, also as lately possessed by Mr. Andrew, consisting of thirty acres, or thereby; lying contiguous to Gilandersland. There is an excellent mansion house of three storeys on Greenknow, with coach-house, stable; garden, and every other convenience. These lands are all in high condition, and are intersected with thriving belts of planting.

 VIII.-All and whole the FARM and LANDS of STANERIG, as presently possessed by James Broom, consisting of 12 acres or thereby, also lying in the parish of Muiravonside and county of Stirling.

Note -The public burdens of the different lands comprised in these three lots are trifling, and they will be sold together or separately, as may be thought most suitable.

 IX.-That excellent DWELLING.HOUSE, with offices and others thereto attached commonly called CARRON LODGE, presently possessed as an Inn by Hugh Steven, with the three roods of land or thereby upon which the same are situated, lying in the parish and within a mile of the town of Falkirk, and less than a quarter of a mile of the old established and flourishing work of Carron. X.-That SEAT in the CHURCH of LINLITHGOW, marked No. 24, belonging to and possessed by Mr. Andrew.

For particulars application may be made to Mr. Roberts, writer Linlithgow, trustee on Mr. Andrew's estate; or to Messrs Horne and Easton W. S. 17, Heriot Row; or Mr. Napier,23. Albany Street, Edinburgh. Linlithgow, 15th Sept. 1817.

 

 

1818

Caledonian Mercury - Monday 23rd April 1818

CIRCUIT INELLIGENCE.

Stirling, April 18.  This day the Circuit Court of Justiciary was opened here by the Right Hon. Lord Pitmilly.

The Court next proceeded to the trial of Henry Taylor and Robert Galloway, carters at Craigend, in the parish of Muiravonside, and county of Stirling, accused of theft by stealing and theftuously carrying away from a field adjoining the high road leading from, Linlithgow to Falkirk, six sheaves of oats or thereby, all the property of Robert Harvie, residing in Linlithgow. The case as to the pannel Taylor was not gone into.- The Jury found the pannel Gallaway guilty; and after a suitable admonition, Lord Pitmilly sentenced him to six months imprisonment in the jail of Stirling. This ended the criminal business at this place.

Caledonian Mercury – Monday 27th April 1818

Advertisements & Notices

UPSET PRICE REDUCED.

TO be SOLD by public roup, within McKENZIES Inn, Linlithgow, on Friday next, the 1st of May, at 12 o'clock noon.

THAT PROPERTY, called STANERIG, lying in the parish of Muiravonside, and county of Stirling, near the line of the Union Canal, consisting of 12 acres or thereby, as presently possessed by James Broom, and forming part of the sequestrated estate of Mr. Andrew, brewer, Linlithgow.

For particulars apply to Mr. Roberts, writer, Linlithgow, trustee on Mr. Andrew's estate, who is possessed of the title- deeds and articles of sale.

 

Caledonian Mercury - Thursday 9th 30th July 6th 13th 27th August 3rd September 22nd October 1818

LANDS IN STIRLINGSHIRE TO BE SOLD.

BY VIRTUE OF POWERS IN A BOND AND DISPOSITION IN SECURITY.

To be SOLD by public roup, within the house of John -Thomson, vintner, Falkirk, on Thursday the 17th September 1818, at two o'clock afternoon, if not previously disposed of by private bargain. ALL and, Whole the Just and equal HALF of the LANDS of BLACKSTONE, viz. all and whole that TEN SHILLING LAND) of BLACKSTONE, anciently  fued to William Black of Blackstone, and James Black, his son, as a part and portion of the Ten Pound Lands of Balenbreich, together with certain parts and portions of the Mosses of Muiravonside and Drumbroider with houses, pendicles, and pertinants, all lying within the Barony of Callender, parish of Muiravonside and sheriffdom of Stirling. these lands are held of a subject superior for payment of a trifling feu-duty. They are situated about four miles from Linlithgow, and at an equal distance from Falkirk. They extend to twenty seven acres or thereby, mostly arable, and are susceptible of considerable improvement. There are plenty of coal and lime in the neighbourhood. The road from Linlithgow to Airdrie, by Avon Bridge, passes through the lands, and the cross road from Falkirk to Bathgate is within a short distance of the property.

For farther particulars application may be made, to Mr. Alexander Monro, writer, Falkirk, or William Waddell, W,S. 40, Northumberland Street, Edinburgh, in whose hands are the articles of roup and title deeds.

Alexander Malcolm, at Broadhead, will shew the premises

8th July 1818.

 

 

1819

 

Caledonian Mercury - Monday 8th February 1819

There was held at Bathgate, on the 15th ult., a numerous and highly respectable meeting, in the Antiburgher meeting-house, to consider on the propriety of a union between the Burgher and Antiburgher churches; members from Whitburn and Avonbridge congregations were among them. The greatest cordiality prevailed, and a number of spirited resolutions were carried in favour of the union.

 

Caledonian Mercury - Monday 26th July 1819

 Advertisements & Notices

RESIDENCE IN STIRLINGSHIRE.

To be SOLD by Private Bargain,

THE HOUSE and LANDS of VELLORE, in the parish of Muiravonside, nineteen miles from Edinburgh, three from Linlitlhgow, and five from Falkirk. The house is very conveniently laid out, and the public rooms, which are spacious, command one of the finest and most extensive views in Scotland. There are also a coach- house, stable, and other offices, and a good kitchen garden. The lands extend to fifty-two Eniglish acres, and are subdivided into five inclosures, by thriving plantations well grown. They are all arable and of good quality. The Union Canal, which, when completed, will afford water carriage to Edinburgh and Glasgow, passes within half-a mile, and there is a good butcher market within a mile of the house. Major Bogle, who occupies the house, will give directions for showing the property and to him; or Donaldson and Ramsay, writers to the signet, Hanover steet, Edinburgh, application may be made for farther information. The latter are in possession of the title-deeds and a plan of the lands.

 

Caledonian Mercury – Monday 6th September 1819

Advertisements & Notices

JUIDICIAL SALE OF PARKHALL AND CLARKSTONE.

To be SOLD by public roup, within the Parliament or New Session House of Edinburgh, upon Wednesday the I7th November 1819, betwixt the hours of five and seven in the afternoon under the authority of the Lords of Council and Session, and in presence of the Lord Ordinary officiating on the bills,

 THE, LANDS and ESTATES of PARKHALL and, CLARKSTONE, lying in the parishes of Muiravonside, Polmont, and Falkirk, and county of Stirling, in the following lots :- 

Lot I-

The LANDS of NICOLTON, WESTSHOT, HILLHEAD0 or HILLSIDE, GILMEADOWLAND, and PARKHALL, CRAIGEND, or WESTER and NORTH ROOMS of MADISTON, and the other parts of MADISTON,and FEUS thereof, and the two MANUELRIGS, lying in the baronies of Manuelfoulis and Haining respectively; ROWANTREEYARDS, WHITERIG, and EASTER part of GILSTON ; under which lands are comprehended as parts thereof the lands known by the names of Parkford, Tappoch, Easter Knowhead, Wester Knowhead, Cairinyhill, Burnside, Croy, Greenwells, Hirst, Glenhead, Glenend, and Snabhead ; the lands of Battock, or Over Gilstone, and the Superiority of the lands of Wester Blalmitchell, In the parish of Slamanan; and of the lands of Maukinlees, part of the barony and lands of Kerse, and the Mid Superiority of that, part and portion of the ten pound lands of the barony, of Haining, lying beneath the moor called Nether Gillandersland.

The gross land rental of this lot is -L.1099 0 6 3-4ths

Deductions for feu and blench duties, public burdens, and surface damage to tenant for working coal quarries, &c.71 0 1 4-12ths

Free Land rent, L.1028 0 5 5-12ths.

Twenty eight years purchase, as the proven value thereof, is -. L.28,784 12 7 8-12ths

 Deduct proven value of the current leases of parts of this lot let to Mr. Wright  .1154 17 1

L. 27,629 15  6 8-12ths Amount of feu-duties L. 1 9 8

Twenty years purchase, as the proven value thereof, 29 13 4 Ten years purchase of L. 10, the present rent of the stone quarry, being the proven value thereof 100 0 0

Proven value of the superiority 700 0 0

Proven value of the wood - 4535 12 0

Total proven value, being the upset price of let L.82,995 0: 10 8-12ths

LOT II. –

 SUPERIORITY  of certain TENEMENTS in the town of FALKIRK. Amount of fue-duties  L.9 8 0 2-12ths. Twenty years purchase, being the proven value thereof  L.63 0 8 4-12ths.

Value of the casualties 50 0 0

Total proven value, being the upset price of lot 2d.L. 113 0 3 4-12ths.

LOT III.-

The LANDS of CLARKSTONE, those parts of the LANDS of POLMONTHILL, acquired in excambion from the Duke of Hamilton, and those parts of STEPMILL and DUMBRECKS , acquired in excambion from Lord Dundas, and the NORTH PART of the LANDS of GILSTON, and the LANDS called EASTER BURNBRAE,and the SUPERIORITY of those parts and portions of the BARONY and LANDS of KERSE, (under the exception of Maukinlees, contained lot 1st.)

The total rent of this lot is  L.370 8 10 ½

Deductions for fue-duties and public burdens5 16 11 1/2.

Free land-rent . . L.364 1 11

Thirty-five years purchase, being the proven value thereof, is  L.12,760 17 1

Deduct proven value of current leases on parts of this lot let to Mr. Wright 844 8 2

L.11,916 8 11

Proven value of the superiority  700 0 0

Proven value of the wood  790 19 9

Total proven value, being the upset price of lot 3d  L.13,407 8. 8

The articles and conditions of sale are in the possession of John Pringle, Depute-clerk of Session; and farther information will be obtained upon applying to Alexanders Douglas; W. S. 40. Albany Street, the common agent in the process of ranking and sale, or to Mr. James Wright, writer in Stirling

 

 

1820's

1820

Caledonian Mercury – Monday 10th January 1820

Advertisements & Notices

JUIDICIAL SALE OF PARKHALL AND CLARKSTONE.

To be SOLD by public roup, within the Parliament or New Session House of Edinburgh, upon Wednesday the I7th November 1819, betwixt the hours of five and seven in the afternoon under the authority of the Lords of Council and Session, and in presence of the Lord Ordinary officiating on the bills,

 THE, LANDS and ESTATES of PARKHALL and, CLARKSTONE, lying in the parishes of Muiravonside, Polmont, and Falkirk, and county of Stirling, in the following lots :- 

Lot I-

The LANDS of NICOLTON, WESTSHOT, HILLHEAD or HILLSIDE, GILMEADOWLAND, and PARKHALL, CRAIGEND, or WESTER and NORTH ROOMS of MADISTON, and the other parts of MADISTON,and FEUS thereof, and the two MANUELRIGS, lying in the baronies of Manuelfoulis and Haining respectively; ROWANTREEYARDS, WHITERIG, and EASTER part of GILSTON ; under which lands are comprehended as parts thereof the lands known by the names of Parkford, Tappoch, Easter Knowhead, Wester Knowhead, Cairinyhill, Burnside, Croy, Greenwells, Hirst, Glenhead, Glenend, and Snabhead ; the lands of Battock, or Over Gilstone, and the Superiority of the lands of Wester Blalmitchell, In the parish of Slamanan; and of the lands of Maukinlees, part of the barony and lands of Kerse, and the Mid Superiority of that, part and portion of the ten pound lands of the barony, of Haining, lying beneath the moor called Nether Gillandersland.

The gross land rental of this lot is -L.1099 0 6 3-4ths

Deductions for feu and blench duties, public burdens, and surface damage to tenant for working coal quarries, &c.71 0 1 4-12ths

Free Land rent, L.1028 0 5 5-12ths.

Twenty eight years purchase, as the proven value thereof, is -. L.28,784 12 7 8-12ths

 Deduct proven value of the current leases of parts of this lot let to Mr. Wright  .1154 17 1

L. 27,629 15  6 8-12ths Amount of feu-duties L. 1 9 8

Twenty years purchase, as the proven value thereof, 29 13 4 Ten years purchase of L. 10, the present rent of the stone quarry, being the proven value thereof 100 0 0

Proven value of the superiority 700 0 0

Proven value of the wood - 4535 12 0

Total proven value, being the upset price of let L.82,995 0: 10 8-12ths

LOT II. –

 SUPERIORITY  of certain TENEMENTS in the town of FALKIRK. Amount of fue-duties  L.9 8 0 2-12ths. Twenty years purchase, being the proven value thereof  L.63 0 8 4-12ths.

Value of the casualties 50 0 0

Total proven value, being the upset price of lot 2d.L. 113 0 3 4-12ths.

LOT III.-

The LANDS of CLARKSTONE, those parts of the LANDS of POLMONTHILL, acquired in excambion from the Duke of Hamilton, and those parts of STEPMILL and DUMBRECKS , acquired in excambion from Lord Dundas, and the NORTH PART of the LANDS of GILSTON, and the LANDS called EASTER BURNBRAE,and the SUPERIORITY of those parts and portions of the BARONY and LANDS of KERSE, (under the exception of Maukinlees, contained lot 1st.)

The total rent of this lot is  L.370 8 10 ½

Deductions for fue-duties and public burdens5 16 11 1/2.

Free land-rent . . L.364 1 11

Thirty-five years purchase, being the proven value thereof, is  L.12,760 17 1

Deduct proven value of current leases on parts of this lot let to Mr. Wright 844 8 2

L.11,916 8 11

Proven value of the superiority  700 0 0

Proven value of the wood  790 19 9

Total proven value, being the upset price of lot 3d  L.13,407 8. 8

The articles and conditions of sale are in the possession of John Pringle, Depute-clerk of Session; and farther information will be obtained upon applying to Alexander Douglas; W. S. 40. Albany Street, the common agent in the process of ranking and sale, or to Mr. James Wright, writer in Stirling

 

Caledonian Mercury - Monday 7th August 9th 16th October 6th November 1820

Advertisements & Notices

JUIDICIAL SALE OF PARKHALL.

To be SOLD by public roup, within the Parliament or New Session House of Edinburgh, upon Wednesday the 22nd day of November 1819, betwixt the hours of two and four in the afternoon under the authority of the Lords of Council and Session, and in presence of the Lord Ordinary officiating on the bills,

THE FOLLOWING LOTS of LANDS and ESTATES of PARKHALL, lying in the parishes of Muiravonside and Polmont, and county of Stirling :- 

LoT III.

As formerly advertised, comprehending the LANDS of CRAIGEND and WHITERIG, KNOWHEAD, WESTER the MANUELRIG, that part of EASTER MANUELRIG lying on the west side of the road leading from Falkirk to, Bathgate, BURNSIDE, CROY, GREENWELLS,HIRST, and GLENEND, and these parts of TARDUFF MUIR allocated to the estate of Parkhall, all which lands are bounded partly on the east by the said road leading from Falkirk to Bathgate, on the north by Parkhall coal road and on the west by the Drove Loan. The free land rent of this lot is L.297 13s. 8d. 2-12ths: the wood is valued at L.3725 12s. ; And it was formerly exposed at the price of L.12,410 9s. 6d. and will now be exposed at the reduced upset price of L. 10,000.

LOT IV.

Comprehending the LANDS of GLENHEAD, lying on the west side of the Drove Loan, formerly exposed at the price of L.932 16s; and will now be exposed at the reduced upset price of L.800.

LOT V.

Comprehending the LANDS of SNABHEAD, lying on the west side of the Drove Loan, formerly exposed at the upset price of L.942 11s. 8d. and now to be exposed at the reduced upset price of L.800.

LOT VI.

Comprehending that part of the LANDS of BATTOCH called AVONSDE COTTAGE, that part of BATTOCH and NICOLTON, lying on the west and north sides of the Parkhall coal road, and that piece of GROUND and PLANTATION, part of PARKHALL, called TAPPOCH, lying on the north side of said coal road; all which lands are bounded on the south and east by the aforesaid coal road. The free land rent of this lot is L.179 17s. 6d. 6-12ths: the wood is valued at L.200; and it was formerly exposed at the upset price of L.4876 18s. 3d and is now to be exposed at the reduced upset price of L.4000.

The articles and conditions of sale are in the hands of Mr. John Pringle, Depute-clerk of Session and farther information will be obtained upon applying to Alexander Douglas W.S. 40. Albany Street, Edinburgh, the common agent in the process of ranking and sale, or to Mr. James Wright, writer in Stirling.  

 

 

1821

Morning Post - Saturday 8th December 1821

The Members of the Linlithgow and Stirlingshire Hunt met at Linlithgow on the 22d ultimo, when there were present The following : — The Right Hon. Lord Abercromby, the Hon. C. Elphinstone Fleming, the Hon. George Ralph Abercromby, Sir Thomas Livingston, of Westquarter, Bart. Sir James Dalyell, of Binns, Bart.; Thomas Graham Stirling, Esq. of Airth ; Colonel Andrew Gillon, of Wallhouse , Major Norman Shairp, Jun. of Houston ; Major C. L. Bruce, of Kinnaird ; Colonel L. H. Ferrier, of Bellside; Alex. Macleod, Esq. of Muiravonside; D.M. Binning, Esq. of Softlaw; James Johnston, Esq. of Straiton ; Colonel F. Simpson, of Plean ; and M. Bruce, Esq. jun. of Stenbouse.

 

Caledonian Mercury - Thursday 13th 20th September 1821

LANDS IN STIRLINGSHIRE FOR SALE.

To be SOLD by public roup, on Wednesday the 26th September next, within the Royal Exchange Coffeehouse Edinburgh, at two o’clock afternoon, if not previously disposed of by private bargain, THAT PART of the LANDS of' MAIDSTON called NORTHPARKFORD, the LANDS of SOUTHPARKFORD or DAVIESTON, and PART of GlLMEADOWLANDS, all generally included under the name of DAVIESTON, consisting of upwards of 30 acres, Scots- measure, lying in the parish of Muiravonside, within three miles of Linlithgow and eleven of Stirling. These lands were formerly a part of the Parkhall estate which, with the lands of Mr. Drummond of Valore, bounds them on the east. They are all arable and subdivided, and in a high state of cultivation, having all been laid down in grass this season. A suitable steading is on the ground, and there are several thriving belts of planting on the lands. A purchaser may get the natural possession of them at Martinmas next. The public burdens are extremely trifling, and the terms of payment of the price will be made agreeable to a purchaser. The Union Canal passes within a few paces of the ground, and the public road to Edinburgh within about one mile of the property. A more beautiful and convenient situation for a villa could not be had.

For farther particulars apply to the proprietor, or to David Greig, W.S. 1,Forth Street, who is in possession of the plan and title deeds, and has power to conclude a bargain William Johnston, the tenant at Maidston, will shew the lands.

 

Caledonian Mercury - Monday 3rd December 1821

The members of the Linlithgow and Stirlingshire Hunt met at Linlithgow on the 22nd ult, when there were present the following :-

 The Right Hon; Lord Abercromby, the Hon. C. Elphinstone Fleming, the Hon. George Ralph Abercromby,Sir Thomas Livingston of Westquarter, Bart., Sir James Dalyell of Binns, Bart., Thomas Graham Stirling, Esq. of Airth,  Colonel Andrew Gillon of Wallhouse, Major Norman Shairp, younger of Houston, Major C. L. Bruce of Kinnaird, ColonelL. R. Ferrier of Belside, Alexander Macleod, Esq. of Muiravonside, D. M. Binning, Esq. of Softlaw. James JohnstonEsq, of Straiton, Colonel F. Simpson of Plean, and Michael Bruce, Esq. younger of Stenhouse.

The meeting elected for the ensuing year-.- Sir JAMES DALYELL of Binns, Bart. to be Preses.

Sir Gilbert Stirling of Larbert, Col. L. H. Ferrier of Bellside, Council

 J. Boyd, Esq. Treasurer and Secretary.

 

 

1822

 

Caledonian Mercury - Saturday 29th June, Glasgow Herald 8th July 1822

RESIDENCE IN STIRINGSHIIRE.

To be SOLD by private bargain, THE HOUSE and LANDS of VELLORE, in the Parish of Muiravonside, 19 miles from Edinburgh,3 from Linlithgow, and 5 from Falkirk. The House is modern, commodious, and substantial, and the public rooms, which are spacious, command one of the finest and most extensive views in Scotland. There are also a suitable Coach House, Stable, and other offices, and a good Kitchen Garden.  The Lands extend to 52 English acres, are subdivided into 5 inclosures, and are well sheltered, and ornamented by numerous stripes and clumps of panting. They are all presently occupied as Grass Parks, and are out of lease, so that a purchaser can have immediate possession. The Union Canal passes within less than half a mile of the Property on which elegant passage boats ply four time a day between Edinburgh and Glasgow, thus affording daily communication by the most pleasant conveyance, and at a very easy rate. Major Bogle, who occupies the House, will give direction for shewing the property, and to him, or Mr. James Orr, 100South Bridge or Mr. John Brown, Fountain Bridge; or Messrs Donaldson & Ramsay, W. S. 73. George Street, application may be made for farther information.

 

Caledonian Mercury - Monday 3rd December 1821

NOTICE.

THE Rev. WILLIAM M'CALL, Minister of the PARISH of MUIRAVONSIDE, in the presbytery of Linlithgow hereby intimates to the Titulars and Tacksmen of the Teinds, Heritors, and Liferenters, and all others having or pretending to have interest in the Teinds of the Parish of Muiravonside, that he has raised a Summons of Augmentation, Modification, and Locality of his Stipend, which will be called in Court on Wednesday the 29th day of November next. Edinburgh, 27th Sept. 1822.

1824

 

Caledonian Mercury - Saturday 10th January, 5th, 19th, 26th 1824

RESIDENCE IN STIRINGSHIIRE.

To be SOLD by private bargain, THE HOUSE and LANDS of VELLORE, in the Parish of Muiravonside, 19 miles from Edinburgh,3 from Linlithgow, and 5 from Falkirk. The House is modern, commodious, and substantial, and the public rooms, which are spacious, command one of the finest and most extensive views in Scotland. There are also a suitable Coach House, Stable, and other offices, and a good Kitchen Garden.  The Lands extend to 52 English acres, are subdivided into 5 inclosures, and are well sheltered, and ornamented by numerous stripes and clumps of panting. They are all presently occupied as Grass Parks, and are out of lease, so that a purchaser can have immediate possession. The Union Canal passes within less than half a mile of the Property on which elegant passage boats ply four time a day between Edinburgh and Glasgow, thus affording daily communication by the most pleasant conveyance, and at a very easy rate. Major Bogle, who occupies the House, will give direction for shewing the property, and to him, or Mr. James Orr, 100South Bridge or Mr. John Brown, Fountain Bridge; or Messrs Donaldson & Ramsay, W. S. 73. George Street, application may be made for farther information.

 

Caledonian Mercury – Thursday 8th April 1824

DAY FOR PURLIC ROUP FIXED.

PARKHALL COLLIERY TO BE LET,

For One, or more years, from 25th May next, The Well-known LEVEL- FREE COLLIERY, belonging to the Estate of the late ALEX. LIVINGSTON, Esq., of, Parkhall, in the parish of Muiravonside, Stirlingshire, is now to be LET for one or more years from 25th May next, by public roup, within the Royal Exchange Coffeehouse, Edinburgh on Wednesday the 5th day of May next, at two o'clock afternoon. The coal is known to be of excellent quality, at present working at the rate of about 14,000 tons yearly; and having a market now opened to any extent by means of the Edinburgh Union Canal, which passes through the estate. The articles of roup will be shown, and every other information given by John Stuart, accountant, Trustees' Office, Edinburgh.

N. B.- Every offerer must be ready to give sufficient sureties.

Edinburgh, 5th April 1824.

 

Caledonian Mercury - Thursday 18th  November 1824

WAIF STOTS AND A BULL FOUND.

THERE were found straying, about the last October Falkirk Tryst, TWO STOTS, upon the Lands of Ellrigg in the parish of Slamannan, and county of Stirling, and a BULL, upon the Lands of Crawhill, in the parish of Muiravonside, and county of Stirling; and application having been made by the Procurator-Fiscal to the Sheriff of Stirlingshire thereanent, he appointed them to be advertised, certifying the lieges, that unless they are claimed, and the property proved, they will be sold to defray the expence of their keeping, and of the legal proceedings, To which all concerned are requested to attend.

Stirling 16th Nov. 1824.

1825

 

Caledonian Mercury - Monday 31st  January 1825

Died

At Edinburgh, on the 25th current, Mr. WILLIAM CALDER student of divinity, aged 26, son of Mr. Patrick Calder, schoolmaster, Muiravonside, Stirlingshire.

 

Caledonian Mercury Saturday 13th , Monday 15TH August 1825

MUIRAVONSIDE COAL AND IRONSTONE.

To be LET, for such number of years as may be agreed on, THE Valuable SEAMS of C0AL, lying in the LANDS of MUIRAVONSIDE, and county of Stirling, which have been worked to some extent by means of a Day Level. The Main Seam has been lately opened up, and found to be of very good quality, particularly for Smithy purposes. The COAL FIELD, which is about a mile from the Union Canal, and from which a good cart road passes to the shipping place at Causewayend Bridge, is well adapted for supplying the Edinburgh market; and, as it can be easily fitted and worked with a small capital, is well worthy the attention of those engaged in the Coal Trade. From the situation of this Coal, there is every probability of an extensive country sale; and the town of Linlithlgow; which is distant only four miles, will be a principal market. There is also BAND and BALL IRONSTONE in the property, of good quality, which can be worked at little expesnce, as these in part form the roof of some of the coals. The Coal Field will require to be fitted by a Steam Engine of moderate power; but the depth of the engine will not be great.

Farther information will be given by Michael Linning, Esq. 22, Hill Street, or Mr. Geddes, at Mr. Bald's, 15, Dublin Street.

John Gardener, at Muiravonside, will show specimens of the coal; and, as the old waste is open, intending offerers will have an opportunity of inspecting the Coal and Ironstone, by applying at Muiravonside House.

Edinburgh, 10th August I825.

1826

Caledonian Mercury Thursday 27th, , April, Glasgow Herald – Monday 14th March, Friday 28th  April 1826

STIRLING CIRCUIT.

Stirling Circuit was opened on Thursday by Lords Meadowbank and Mackenizie. John M'Graddy and John Corran or Curran, were placed at the bar, charged with stouthrief or theft, accompanied by housebreaking, or one or other of these crimes, in having broken into the Manse of Muiravonside, and carried away several articles of wearing apparel, nine silver tea-spoons, and a gold watch.

The prisoners pleaded, Not Guilty.

 Rev. Wm. McCall, at Muiravonside, said, that his manse is near the Union Canal, and was broke into on the 1th of Dec. last, about one o'clock in the morning. About that hour he heard a noise, which he conceived to be proceed from the servants finishing their work. Sometime after he heard a loud noise, which made him rise, though he still thought it was occasioned by the servants. He came to the head of the stair and saw a light about twenty feet below, and in a few minutes two men rushed up stairs. One of them had on something resembling a Spanish cloak, or a great coat, muffled up, which concealed his face. One of the men was armed with a pistol and the other with a sword. The man with the pistol said, "If vou do not give up your money I shall shoot you". (Here a sword and a pistol were shown the witness, but he could not be certain that they were those with which he was threatened.) The two men forced witness from the bed room, and went to a chest of drawers, which they ransacked. They took away a gold watch that was suspended at the window; it was there the preceding evening when he went to bed. The witness saw them take the watch away. The money taken away in the handkerchief consisted of two pounds of the Commercial Bank, and the rest of silver, half crowns, shillings, &c. The thieves afterwards forced witness down stairs. They said they wanted his money, and did not want to hurt him. They went into the parlour, and whilst there they threatened to bind him. In the press were an antique silver tea-pot and some other antique things, which they left; but they took away some silver tea-spoons marked W.M. They proceeded thereafter to the dining-room. Witness did not go into the room with them; but when he saw them at the press, with their backs turned to him, he unlocked the front door and got out, and went for assistance to Mr. Reid, a farmer, about 400 yards distant. The men were all disguised. Their hair was brought forward, and frizzed very much. Whenever they were looked at, they threw the arm before the face. Witness does not exactly know what property was taken away. The pannels have the, appearance and size of the men who took away the articles, but he never saw their faces, because they always covered them. There were more than two men engaged in the plundering. Cross-examined.- From the accentuation of the word "money," he judged the persons to be Irishmen. The night was perfectly dark, but, from the light upon the stair, saw all they did. Two female servants proved the robbery of their master's property. Graddy was like one of the robbers. Edward Quin, a Roman Catholic, sworn upon the gospels, said, he had ill-will against the pannels; but being cross-examined, said he was not so swayed by ill-will as to swear any thing to their prejudice or injury. The Court here informed the witness, that the Public Prosecutor, in committing him as an evidence there, had passed from every charge against him, and that in telling the truth he had no cause for alarm. He said he was a boatman on the Union Canal in the boat No. 61; McGraddy was along with him in that boat; they sailed last Upon the 9th of December, before he was taken up; they left Edinburgh upon the Friday night; witness did not, see M'Graddy that Sunday morning; first heard of the manse having been broken into when the officers were searching the different boats; McGraddy told witness that the manse had been broken into, and that he (McG.) was one of the persons engaged in it; witness sailed for Edinburgh on the Tuesday, and when they got to Kincavil Quarry they were apprehended. The officers found a pair of stockings among the coals; never wore that pair himself, but saw McGraddy wear pair like them, which he had on before the officers came up; could not say that McGraddy had ever before worn stockings like them. Two sheriff-officers proved having apprehended the pannels on board a boat on the Union Canal, and of having found a pair of stockings with Mr. McCall's initials on them, which they identified. The declarations of the prisoners were produced. A letter from McGraddy to Mr. Sawers, the procurator fiscal, was read, requesting him to have him brought before the Sheriff, that he might make disclosures relative to the house - breaking, on the promise of being allowed to be King's       evidence; but no such promise was made. He was, however, examined and emitted a declaration, confessing his being guilty of the crime libelled, and that Quin and Curran were his companions in the housebreaking and robbery. The Jury, without leaving the box, returned a verdict, finding McGraddy Guilty of stouthrief, as libelled, and Curran Not Guilty, who was dismissed simpliciter from the bar. After an impressive address, Lord Mackenzie sentenced the unfortunate young man to be executed at Stirling, on Friday the 26th of May next.

 

 

1829

London Standard - Wednesday 7th  January 1829

BURKE THE MURDERER.

(From the Edinburgh Evening Post.)

As every thing relating to the ruffian Burke may be interesting at present, we add the following particulars about him during his residence in the parish of Peebles: He and Helen McDougall resided in that burgh in the years 1825 and 1826, and part of 1827. "I find," says our correspondent, “that he is a native of Armagh, in the north of Ireland ; that he was a Roman Catholic ; was a labourer, and employed in working on the roads and in cutting drains. He made considerable pretensions to religion, as I recollect on my first visit to his house, he had one or two religious books lying near him, which, he said, he read ; being, at that time, confined by a sore leg. He seemed a man of quiet manners; and, on my questioning him about his country and profession, there appeared a mystery about him. Since he has gained a guilty notoriety, I have made inquiries among his neighbours of his character; and I am informed that he was an inoffensive man; but that he kept suspicious hours. On the Saturday nights and the Sabbath- days his house was the scene of riot and drunken-ness with the lowest of his countrymen. When he left this place he owed the woman from whom he rented his room between 40 and 50 shillings. He was then going to the harvest, and promised to return and pay the rent, which he never did. On application being made to him afterwards in Edinburgh for payment he sent word to the woman to meet him at the head of Eddlestone Water, a wild and desolate part of the road leading from this place to Edinburgh. The meeting was to be at ten o'clock at night, when he would pay her. Recent disclosures have fully proved for what purpose such a meeting was to take place. He is now about 37 years of age. "Helen M'Dougall told me she was his wife, and always passed as such in this parish. She had no children by Burke, but a daughter of the name of Dougall by a former marriage, as she pretended. She is native of Muiravonside parish, in Stirlingshire. Her character was not so good as Burkes. She is about his age. “In the Post of Saturday last you term Burke's pretended trade as a shoemaker, and I consider you are correct. He passed here as a labourer; and I believe he was no trade whatever."

 

Huntingdon, Bedford & Peterborough Gazette - Saturday 10th  January 1829

THE LATE MURDERS IN EDINBURGH.

(From the Scotsman.)

The irritation and alarm, excited in this city by the West Port murders, is beginning to subside. Hare and his wife are still in close confinement, and there is a possibility that they may both be yet brought to the punishment they deserve. If, as was stated in our last, the public prosecutor can command evidence sufficient to satisfy a Jury, that Hare, or any of his associates, has been accessory to any other murders than those libelled in Burkes indictment, they will certainly expiate their crimes with their lives. The silence and solitude of his cell have given the monster Hare his opportunity of reflection, and the latent sparks of feeling and humanity are beginning to revive in his breast. He is fully aware, that a likeness of his horrid physiognomy will be taken, to excite the indignation and disgust of posterity, and he seems resolved to prevent it so far as lies in his power. He is seen by gentlemen in authority only, and when any of them enter, he instantly muffles himself up in the bedclothes, so that nothing more than his eyes and forehead can be seen. Yesterday he declined to avail himself of the felon's privilege of walking his time in the ward, and chose to want, or run the risk of wanting, his supper, rather than go for it to the gate like other criminals. His wretched wife also remains constantly in her cell, and maintains a dogged silence respecting the atrocities of their past lives. With respect to Burke, it is not likely that his name will again pollute our pages till he ends his life on the scaffold. Indeed he would not have been mentioned at present had it not been that two circumstances were omitted in the hurry of getting up our last report. It was mentioned already that he denied, when in the lockup, that he was present at the murder of James Wilson, known by the name of " Daft Jamie," and he gave the following details: " When I was at work, Hare's wife came and told me that they had a lad of the name of Daft Jamie in the house, and were intending to "do him " for the doctors. She stated that she had already got a good deal of whiskey, and asked me to come and help them to finish him. She told me to come in and ask if he had got any whiskey, and if he said yes, I was to send for more. I was detained with a shoe for about twenty minutes, and when I went to the door it was fastened; but I was told by a female voice to stop about three minutes, and all would be over. When I got in I saw Hare, his wife, and another man I'll not name, and Jamie lying quite dead. The body was stripped, and when I looked at the clothes, I said these clothes will answer -------, and they were sent to him." When asked if he had no compunctious visitings of nature—no remorse—no stings of consciense he replied, that for a long time after he had murdered his first victim, he found it utterly impossible to banish for a single hour the recollections of the fatal struggle the screams of distress and despair the agonising groans and all the realities of the dreadful deed. At night the bloody tragedy, accompanied by frightful visions of supernatural beings, tormented him in his dreams but he ultimately became so callous, that a murder added but little to his mental anguish. It is something consoling to reflect that this revolting monster has been overtaken in his path of blood, and is soon to expire on the gallows. (From the Edinburgh Evening Post.) As every thing relating to the ruffian Burke may be interesting at present, we give the following particulars about him during his residence in the parish of Peebles: He and Helen M'Dougall resided in that burgh in the years 1825 and 1826, and part of 1827. " I find," says our correspondent, " that he is a native of Armagh, in the north of Ireland ; that he was a Roman Catholic ; was a labourer, and employed in working on the roads and in cutting drains. He made considerable pretensions to religion, as I recollect, on my first visit to his house, he had one or two religious books lying near him, which, he said, he read ; being, at that time, confined by a sore leg. He seemed a man of quiet manners; and on my questioning him about his country and profession, there appeared a mystery about him Since he has gained a guilty notoriety, I have made inquiries among his neighbours of his character; and I am informed that he was an inoffensive man; but that he kept suspicious hours. On the Saturday night and the Sabbath days his house was the sceneof riot and drunkenness with the lowest of his countrymen. When he left this place he owed the woman from whom he rented his room between forty and fifty shillings He was then going to the harvest, and promised to return and pay the rent, which be never did. On application being made to him afterwards in Edinburgh for payment, he sent word to the woman to meet him at the head of Eddlestone Water, a wild and desolate part of the road leading from this place to Edinburgh. The meeting was to be at ten o'clock at night, when he would pay her. Recent disclosures have fully proved for what purpose such a meeting was to take place. He is now about 37 years of age. "Helen M'Dougall told me she was his wife, and always passed as such in this parish. She had no children by Burke, but a daughter of the name of Dougal by a former marriage, as she pretended. She is a native of Muiravonside Parish, in Stirlingshire. Her character was not so good as Burkes. She is about his age" "In the Post of Saturday last you term Burkes 'a pretended trade as a shoemaker,' and I consider you are correct. He passed here as a labourer; and I believe he was no trade whatever."

CONFESSIONS OF BURKE.

(From the Caledonian Mercury.)

The information from which the following article is drawn up we have received from a most respectable quarter, and its perfect correctness in all respects may be confidently relied on. In truth, it is as near as possible a strict report, rather than the substance, of what passed at an interview with Burke; in the course of which the unhappy man appears to have opened his mind without reserve, and to have given a distinct and explicit answer to every question which was put to him relative to his connexion with the late murders.  After some conversation of a religious nature, in the course of which Burke stated, that while in Ireland, his mind was under the influence of religious impressions, and that he was accustomed to read his Catechism and Prayerbook, and attend to his duties, be was asked, "How comes it, then, that you, who, by your own account, were once under the influence of religious impressions, ever formed the idea of such dreadful atrocities, of such cold-blooded, systematic murders, as you admit you have been engaged -in how came such a conception to enter your mind .'' To this Burke replied, that he did not exactly know; but that becoming addicted to drink, living in open adultery, and associating continually with the most abandoned characters, he gradually became hardened and desperate; gave up attending chapel or any place of religious worship, shunned the face of a priest, and being constantly familiar with every species of wickedness, he at length grew indifferent to what he did, and was ready to commit any crime. He was then asked how long he had been engaged in this murderous traffic. To which he answered, "From Christmas, 1827, to the murder of the woman Docherty, in October last.”How many persons have you murdered, or been concerned in murdering, during that time? Were there thirty in all. "Not so many; not so many, I assure you. How many? "He answered the question, but the answer was, for a reason perfectly satistory, not communicated to us, and reserved for a different quarter.”Had you any accomplices?"

"None but Hare. We always took care, when we were going to commit a murder, that no one else should be present thus no one could swear he saw the deed done. The women might suspect when we were going to do it; they never saw us commit any of the murders. One of the murders was done in Broggan's house, while he was out; but before he returned, the thing was finished and the body put into a box. Broggan evidently suspected something, for he appeared much agitated, and entreated us to take away that box, which we accordingly did, but be was not in any way concerned in it." "You have already told me that you were engaged in these atrocities from Christmas, 1827, till the end of October, 1828 ; were you associated with Hare during all that time?'." "Yes. We began with selling to Dr. -----------the body of a woman who had died a natural death in Hare's house. We got ten pounds for it. After this we began the murders, and all the rest of the bodies we sold to him were murdered." "In what place were these murders generally committed?" "They were mostly committed in Hare's house, which was very convenient for the purpose, as it consisted of a room and a kitchen. Daft Jamie was murdered there. The story told of this murder is incorrect. Hare began the struggle with him, and they fell and rolled together on the floor; then I went to Hare's assistance, and we at length finished him, though with much difficulty. I committed one murder in the country by myself. It was in last harvest. All the rest were done in conjunction with Hare. "By what means were these fearful atrocities perpetrated?" "By suffocation. We made the persons drunk, and then suffocated them by holding the nostrils and mouth, and getting on the body. Sometimes I held the mouth and nose, while Hare went upon tbe body; and sometimes Hare held the mouth and nose, while I placed myself on tbe body. Hare has perjured himself by what he said at the trial about the murder of Docherty. He did not sit by while I did it, as he says. He was on the body assisting me with all his might, while I held the nostrils and mouth with one hand, choaked her under the throat with the other. We sometimes used a pillow, but did not in this case." "Now, Burke, answer me this question - Were you tutored and instructed, or did you receive hints from any one as to the mode of committing murder?" "No, except from Hare. We often spoke about it, and we agreed that suffocation was the best way. Hare said so, and I agreed with him - We generally did it by suffocation." [Our informant omitted to interrogate him about the surgical instruments stated to have been found in the house; but this omission will be supplied.] "Did you receive any encouragement to commit or persevere in committing these atrocities?”- Yes; we were frequently told by Paterson that he would take as many bodies as we could get for him. There was commonly another person with him, of the name of Falconer. They generally pressed us to get more bodies for them." "To whom were the bodies so murdered sold?'' - "To Dr. ---------- We took the bodies to his rooms in ------------, and then went to his house to receive the money for them. Sometimes he paid us himself; sometimes we were paid by his assistants. No questions were ever asked as to the mode in which we had come by the bodies. We had nothing to do but to leave a body at the rooms, and go get the money." "Did you ever, upon any occasion, sell a body or bodies to any other lecturer in this place?" - “Never; we knew no other. ""You have been a resurrectionist (as it is called) I understand?" - “No; neither Hare nor myself ever got a body from a church-yard. All we sold were murdered save the first one, which was that of the woman who died a natural death in Hare's house. We began with that; our crimes then commenced. The victims we selected were generally elderly persons. They could be more easily disposed of than persons in the vigour of health.'' Such are the disclosures which this wretched man has made, under circumstances which can scarcely fail to give them weight with the public; and after being strongly admonished, he declared, upon the word of a dying man, that every thing be had said was true, and that he had in no respect exaggerated or extenuated any thing, either from a desire to inculpate Hare, or to spare any one else. The unhappy man is, moreover, perfectly penitent, and resigned to his fate. As often, however, as the subject of the late trial is mentioned, he never fails to assert that Hare perjured himself in the account be gave of tbe murder of the woman; repeating the statement we have already given, that, so far from sitting by, a cool and unconcerned spectator of the crime, Hare actively assisted in the commission of it, and was upon the body of the woman, co-operating with himself in his efforts to strangle her.

 

Manchester Times - Saturday 31st  January 1829

EXECUTlON OF BURKE.

On Wednesday morning, between eight and nine o'clock, William Burke, the Edinburgh murderer, paid the forfeit of his many crimes at the head of Libberton's Wynd, Edinburgh. As the period approached which was to terminate his career, the excitement, which has been all along so deep in that place, was, greatly increased; and great fear was entertained that some tumultuous exhibition of public feeling would be made at the execution. Forunately, however, no such occurrence took place. For some days past, tickets had been exhibited on the windows in the neighbourhood, intimating them to be let for the occasion at from five shillings to one and two guineas, Burke was removed from the Calton jail on Tuesday morning at four o'clock with the strictest privacy, and was lodged in the lock-up-house behind the Parliament square, and in the near neighbourhood of the place of execution. Here he was visited by the catholic priests, and received from them every attention. The measures adopted by the authorities did not afford any opportunities to those in attendance on him to acquire any information, nor did he seem inclined to be communicative. He exclaimed at one time, "O that the hour was come, which is to separate me from the world" He ascribed the commencement of his enormities to a harvesting, which, it is presumed, was meant the formation of his intimacy with McDougal. On being asked on the subject of Daft Jamie's murder, he said that Hare's wife decoyed him into Hare's house, and that Hare and his wife murdered him. During the night he slept soundly for several hours. In the afternoon, measures were begun to rail off a portion of the street for the erection of a scaffold, and crowds attended the place all the time of its erection, and about midnight, and the midst of a heavy rain, the crowd gave three cheers, when the cross beam to which the rope is affixed was placed in its position. By half-past six the whole of the Lawn Market and High-street, as far as a view could be obtained, were crowded, as well as the windows and tops of the houses adjoining; and the number was generally estimated at about 25,000. At about half-past seven o'clock, the crowd began to exhibit symptoms of impatience, and gave a series of loud and long continued shouts, which they repeated at intervals till Burke was brought out. About four o'clock this morning he complained to Mr. Christie, the keeper of the lock-up, of the weight of his fetters, and requested that they might be taken off. This was instantly granted, and, on holding up his leg to let them off, he exclaimed, "So let all my earthly fetters fall." He was attended afterwards in his cell by his instructors, and at seven he was ushered into the keeper's room, where the magistrates and others were waiting. To this room no reporters, save one belonging to an Edinburgh paper, were admitted ; the magistrates having refused their permission. Messrs Reid and Stewart, the priests, administered such consolations as his religion afforded, and afterwards Burke thanked them and the governor of the jail for their kindness to him, and particularly thanked Mr. Christie, the keeper of the lock-up, for his attentions. He was then pinioned by the executioner, and shortly after was about to retire to another apartment, but he was stopped by the executioner; on this Burke coolly remarked, "It is not your time yet." After a short absence he returned, and, after some farther devotional exercises, was offered, by one of the magistrates, a glass of wine. This he accepted, and on drinking, said, "Farewell to all my friends." Precisely at eight o'clock, the procession began to move up Libberton's Wynd, from the lock-up, the city officers being first with the Lochaber axes, and the magistrates following. Burke was next, and was supported by the two priests, and several of the authorities followed. He was dressed in a new suit of black clothes which had been presented to him by the magistrates, and wore a white neckcloth. When the crowd discovered the movement, consequent on the approach of the culprit, they raised a loud cry of exultation, mixed with groans and hissings, from every part of the dense mass of spectators. Burke, who had walked at first with rather a firm but somewhat undetermined step, seemed to understand the cause of the shouting - his steps became embarrassed and faltering, and his countenance displayed strong agitation. He shut his eyes before he reached the head of the Wynd, and did not open them till on the scaffold. He seemed to be afraid of the reception he might meet with from the crowd, but he was assisted up the stairs to the platform. On his appearance there the shouting was renewed; and Burke, turning his face towards the crowd, gave them a look of such scornful defiance, that the groans were redoubled. He then knelt down with the priests, and the Rev. Mr. Marshall offered up a short but fervent and appropriate prayer. Even during this period of the public devotions, the crowd continued to shout and groan, and persisted in so doing in despite of the exertions of the magistrates and others to keep them quiet. After Mr. Marshall finished, a few minutes were spent in conversation with the priest, during which Burke seemed to be suffering dreadfully but resumed a portion of his firmness on receiving the handkerchief and mounting the drop. On stepping up, he gave a singular look upwards to the hook to which this rope was affixed. The executioner then proceeded to adjust the rope, upon which vehement cries were raised from every quarter, of "Burke him," "Burke him." Here he seemed to have lost every feeling; he repeated, as if unconsciously, the words whispered to him by the priest; his face assumed a colour as if he had been already suffocated, and he allowed the cap to be drawn over his face without a motion. At each step of the executioner's duty, the crowd raised another shout, and when the cap was drawn over the face, a cry was raised to keep it off altogether. The authorities then left the scaffold, and in half a minute the signal was given, and the drop fell. Here the shouting, groaning, and hissing, became louder than ever. The rope seemed to be too short, as it was evident he had but a short fall, and the struggles which followed, showed that he suffered much. His hands were extended convulsively, and once or twice he was observed to breathe deeply. The cry for punishment on Hare now became general. “Bring out Hare;” "Now for Hare," and one continued cry was kept up many minutes. This was kept up at intervals till he was cut down at nine. At this moment the crowd called for three cheers "for humanity," and one person from a window cried out "one cheer more," and was answered by the whole crowd. The crowd at this time seemed greatly agitated, and fears were entertained for the public peace, but they were fortunately unfounded. The strong body of police, indeed, which was present, under the charge of Captain Stewart, would have quelled any riotous movement, and the military were under arms in case of necessity. When the body was lowered into the coffin, previous to its being taken to the lock-up-house (from whence it would be afterwards sent for dissection), great anxiety was displayed by a number of persons to possess themselves of pieces of the rope; and when disappointed is in that, they were content to secure a few of the shavings with which the coffin was stuffed. It should have been mentioned, that it was the intention of the authorities to have a psalm sung on the scaffold, and the precentor was there for that purpose; but the idea was prudently relinquished, on observing the state of feeling anong the crowd, and the service was rendered as short as was consistent with the occasion.

LIFE OF BURKE THE MURDERER.

(From the Scotsman.)

Burke was born in the parish of Orrey, county of Tyrone, in Ireland, in 1792. When Burke was at school, he was distinguished as an apt scholar. Becoming anxious to learn some trade, he agreed with a baker in Strabane. He next became a linen weaver. He then enlisted in the Donegal militia. While in the army, he married a woman in Balinha. He shortly afterwards obtained the situation of groom and body servant to a gentleman in that vicinity, with whom he remained for three years. As there was then a great demand for labourers for the Union canal, he abandoned his wife, and came to Scotland. This woman never had any children, and so far as is known, she yet survives, and resides in Ballinha. He commenced work at the Canal, near the village of Muiravonside; he took jobs, which he let out to his countrymeni; and it was there he became acquainted with the woman McDougal. She then resided under her parents' roof, and though tolerably good looking, merry and good-natured, she was considered of easy virtue. She soon became remarkably fond of Burke - she followed him every where; and fled with him from the house of her afflicted parents. On leaving Muiravonside, Burke and his paramour went to the east country to the harvest. He had acquired a partial knowledge of shoe-mending while in the militia. He repaired to Leith in search of work, and wrought some time with as eccentric character, Charles McGranachan. He soon tired of McGrainachan's heavy work and small wages, and he went and laboured in the country. He engaged again on the canal near Winshburgh, but left it and went a second time to the harvest, he next resided in Peebles for some time, where he wrought on the roads. From Peebles he went a third time to thse harvest, and when the crops were cut down, be returned to Edinburgh. Next day he went out in pursuit of some way of subsistence, but, after long and fruitless enquiry, he and Macdougall resolved to visit Glasgow. When passing through the West Port, on their way to the canal-boat, they went into a house for refreshment. Fatally for them, they there met Hare's wife, who persuaded them to stop a few days in her house; and there Burke, it is believed, was initiated into the appalling trade of kidnapping and murdering his fellow creatures, and trafficking in their bodies. In the present state of affairs it would be highly imprudent to say any thing respecting Hare's previous life and transactions. Over the entry leading to his horrid shambles. "Beds to Let" was painted in large letters, and his general charge was 3d a night. Shortly after he had taken Burke into his domicile, a poor forlorn man arrived from a part of the kingdom which it is needless to name, and after some time's illness expired. No enquiry after him being made, the body was sold for dissection. The money being expended, Burke sallied out for the first time in search of a person in whose blood he might imbrue his hands. In a short time fell in with a woman well up in years, who belonged to a village a few miles south of this city, and decoyed her to Hare's abode. The usual preparations being completed, Burke sprung like a tiger on his unsuspecting victim; - he was then only a novice in murder- the struggle was severe, but humanity would shrink at the appalling details. He was a man of remarkably strong passions-by no means of a quarrelsome disposition, but when once roused into a passion, he became altogether ungovernable to reason and utterly reckless, he raged like a fury, and to tame him was no easy task.

MRS. BURK –

It was formerly mentioned that this wretched woman would be driven from place to place, and that she could only hope for a permanent residence where she was utterly unknown. Even her own kindred have i intimated their resolution to drive her hence should she approach them. It appears that after leaving Edinburgh, she went to the neigbourhood of Carnwath. As she had been in that quarter two harvests with Burke, she was instantly recognised, and roughly treated at Newbiggan and several other places.

 

London Standard, Morning Chronicle - Saturday 31st  January 1829

LIFE Of WILLIAM BURKE

[FROM THE SCOTSMAN.]

The biographical sketches of the felons who figure in the pages of the Newgate Calendar are perused with considerable interest, though with little profit. Their whole lives were a career of wickedness and crime, bold, reckless, adventure, desperation, and hair-breadth escapes, till they were cut off by the gallows. On the contrary, till within these eighteen months, the incidents of Burke's life were of the most common and least interesting description; and hence, though anxious to satisfy the public curiosity, the main object of the following outline is to hold out a warning to transgressors, by shewing how surely and how closely punishment dogs the heels of crime. Burke was born in the parish of Orrey, county Tyrone, in Ireland, in the spring of 1792. His parents were poor, but respectable; and, In the fond hope that their sons might one day rise above the toil, poverty, and irksome dependence of the Irish cotters, they gave them a better education than, was then common among their caste of their countrymen. When Burke was at school, he was distinguished as an apt scholar, a cleanly, active, good-looking boy-, and though his parents were strict Catholics, he was taken into the service of Presbyterian Clergyman, who requested them to allow him to reside with him, to run messages and attend in the hall. When he outgrew the minister's work he was recommended by him to a gentleman in Straban, in whose employment be remained for several years. Becoming anxious to learn some trade, he agreed with a baker in the above town, but he remained with him, only five months. He next became a linen-weaver, but he soon got disgusted with the close application that was essential to earn a livelihood at that poorly-paid, irksome employment, and he enlisted in the Donegal Militia, His brother, Constantine, had then attained the rank of non-commissioned-officer in that corps, and William being, as before observed, a cleanly, smart fellow, he was selected by an officer for his servant, and demeaned  himself with the strictest fidelity and propriety. While in the army, he married a woman in Balinha, in the county of Mayo, and after seven years' service, the regiment was disbanded, and he went home to his wife. He shortly afterwards obtained the situation of groom and body servant to a gentleman in that vicinity, with whom he remained for three years. As there was then a great demand for labourers for the Union Canal, he abandoned his wife and came to Scotland. This woman never had any children, and,so far as it is known, she yet survives and resides in Ballinha. He commenced work at the canal, near the village of Muiravonside; he took jobs, which he let out to his country- men; and it was there he became acquainted with the woman McDougal. She then resided under her parents' roof, and though tolerably good-looking, merry, and good-natured, she was considered of easy virtue. She soon became remarkably fond of Burke, and followed him every where; she frequently carried him spirits and beer to refresh him, when at his heavy toil in the hot and sultry days of summer; and at last, by her conduct, reducing to practice the fanciful theory of the poet, "curse on all laws, save those which love has made!" she put herself fairly under his protection, and fled with him from the house of her afflicted parents. Though it rarely happens in such circumstances, her confidence was not misplaced; Burke treated her with the greatest kindness, acknowledged her as his wife, and she was passionately fond of him in return. Rather than give the least information regarding the murderous deeds of her ruthless husband, she boldly stood her trial with him, and though she escaped, she wept bitterly when separated from him for ever by the stern mandate of the law. This flagrant violation of a solemn and sacred contract - this contemptuous disregard of the best feelings of human nature - this gross outrage on morality, common decency, and the laws of the country, was the first guilty step in Burke's life. As he had ever afterwards no fixed place of residence, no particular calling, but wandered about the country picking up a scanty and wretched subsistence ,it may be considered decisive of his, future destiny. Indeed, times without number, in the bitterest accents of regret, he attributed the commencement of his iniquitous career to his inclination for the company of depraved women. On leaving Muiravonside, Burke and his paramour went to the east country to the harvest. When the shearing, was concluded he came into Edinburgh, and lodged some time with a man of the name of Cullen, who then resided in the West Port, he had acquired a partial knowledge of shoe-mending while in the militia, but being utterly unknown, he got very little, or  rather no employment. He repaired to Leith in search of work, and wrought some time with an eccentric character, Charles M'Granachan, a countryman of his own. He soon tired of M'Granachan's heavy work and small wages, and he went and laboured In the country. He engaged again on the canal near Winchburgh, but left it and went a second time to the harvest, He next resided in Peebles for some time, where he wrought on the roads, or took jobs at hedging, ditching, and trenching, and was, in short, considered an industrious and efficient sort of master- of-all-work in the labouring way. It has been already mentioned that he was brought up a professor of the Catholic faith, but he occasionally attended Protestant places of worship; he was no bigot, or rather he was then indifferent about the dogmas and denunciations, the promises and consolations, of all creeds. He generally spent the Sundays in drinking and unholy revelry with the wretches he had in his employment. From Peebles he went a third time to the harvest, and when the crops were cut down, he returned to this city. Next day he went out in pursuit of some way of sustenance, but, after long and fruitless inquiry, he and Macdougal resolved to visit Glasgow. When passing through the West Port, on their way to the canal-boat, they went into a house for a refreshment. Fatally for them, they there met Hare's wife, who persuaded them to stop a few days in her room; and there Burke, it is believed, was initiated into the appalling trade of kidnapping and murdering his fellow-creatures, and trafficking in their bodies. In the present state of affairs it would lie highly imprudent to say anything respecting Hare's previous life and transactions. Over the entry leading to his horrid shambles, "Beds to Let” was painted in large letters, and his general charge was three- pence a night. Shortly after he had taken Burke into his domicile, a poor forlorn man had arrived from a part of the kingdom which it is needless to name, and after some time's illness expired. No inquiry after him being made, the body was sold for dissection. The money being expended, Burke sallied out for the first time in search of a person in whose blood he might imbrue his hands. In a short time he fell in with a woman well up in years, who belonged to a village a few miles south of this city, and decoyed her to Hare's abode. The usual preparations being completed Burke sprung like a tiger on his unsuspecting victim; he was then only a novice in murder - the struggle was severe, but humanity would shrink at the appalling details. In our impression of the 3d inst, it was mentioned, that while Burke was in the lock up after his conviction, in alluding to the great difficulty he experienced in bereaving this unhappy woman of life, he stated, that "for a long time after he had murdered his first victim he found it utterly impossible to banish for a single hour the recollection of the fatal struggle - the screams of distress and despair - the agonising groans, and all the realities of the dreadful deed. At night the bloody tragedy, accompanied by frightful visions of supernatural beings, tormented him in his dreams. For a long time he shuddered at the thought of being alone in the dark - during the night he kept a light constantly burning by his bed-side, but he ultimately became so callous, that a murder added but little to his mental anguish." He was a man of remarkably strong passions - he was good-tempered - by no means of a quarrelsome disposition, but when once roused into a passion, he became altogether ungovernable - deaf to reason and utterly reckless -he raged like a fury, and to tame him was no easy task. Such, in at few words, have been the principal Incidents in the life of William Burke. The narrative, short and unvarnished as it is, affords ample materials for grave and serious consideration. Murder, it is truly said, is the worst of crimes, and in a few months Burke has attained the summit of the "bad eminence" of being the worst of murderers. The long and dark array of common thieves, burglars, robbers, and homicides dwindle into absolute insignificance when brought in juxtaposition with this Colossus in crime. His name will stand conspicuous - it will mark an era in the black record of human delinquency - and future ages will shudder at his horrid deeds, and fling back their curses at the name which the inhuman monster bore.

REMOVAL OF BURKE TO THE LOCK-UP HOUSE.

[FROM THE EDINBURGH WEEKLY JOURNAL.]

Burke was removed from the jail to the lock-up house yesterday (Tuesday) morning, between four and five o'clock, in a carriage, attended by Mr. Rose, the governor, and one of his assistants. He has for the last few days been remarkably calm and collected - sleeping soundly, and entering familiarly into conversation with such persons as had access to him. He is represented as a man of strong, but not much cultivated mind. He has, however, an excellent memory, and is pretty well acquainted with the Scriptures. He writes rather well for one in his station of life. He expresses the utmost contrition for his crimes, which he says have been very great. He did not like Hare or his wife, whom he considers as bad, if not worse than himself. Of the woman M'Dougal he has always spoken in the kindest terms; a mutual attachment appears to have existed between these wretches. They first became acquainted when Burke was working at the canal; she at that period lived with her father, we believe, in the parish of Muiravonside. His lawful wife resided in the parish of Orrey, in the county of Tyrone, Ireland, of which he was a native. When informed that inquiries were making after her, he stated he was sorry that should be done, for he bore a good character there, and a knowledge of his crimes and fate would bring disgrace on those connected with him. After being in the army, it would appear he had followed various occupations, being at one period employed as a baker, at another as a weaver, but principally as a labourer, and latterly he professed to be a cobbler. The wound which has caused Burke so much uneasiness was in the groin, and was received while he was working at the canal. Since Burke's condemnation he has been attended with unremitting assiduity by the Rev. Mr. Reid, Roman Catholic clergyman, but he was willing to receive religious instruction from any quarter and frequently joined in worship with the indefatigable and pious chaplain, Mr. Porteous. The Rev. Mr. Marshall was in the habit of calling occasionally, immediately after his condemnation; but we have been informed that Mr. Reid was afraid that the few days the criminal had to live could not be so profitably employed, if he were liable to he distracted by conflicting opinions on matters of faith; consequently Mr. Marshalls ‘visits were, at Burke's request, discontinued. On Sunday last, Mr. Marshall was Preaching in the jail, and Burke expressed a wish to be present; but as that was at the hour Mr. Reid had appointed to be with him in his cell, he did not attend the chapel. We have authority to say, that Burke particularly requested the Rev. Mr. Marshal to attend him on the scaffold, and that this request was made yesterday (Tuesday), in the Lock-up-house, where Mr. Marshall spent some time with him. We understand that the real number of murders committed by this infamous gang is 16 - 4 in Burke's house when it was occupied by Broggan, who though he might know what had taken place, was not, we believe, present as accessory; four after Broggan left the house; six in Hare's house, and two in his stable adjoining. The first body sald was that of a pensioner who died in Hare's, and for whom a mock funeral was got up - the coffin  being filled with tanner's bark. All the seventeen corpses are said to have been disposed of to the same person, at prices varying from eight to ten pounds. The greater portion of the unfortunate individuals who were murdered, were persons far advanced in life. Workmen were employed yesterday afternoon in fitting up strong wooden barriers to keep off the crowd, which was expected to be very large. So great was the anxiety to secure a place from which to witness the execution, that as high prices as a guinea have been paid for one window, while some are disposed of by retail, at the rate of 2s. 6d, for permission to have a look from one. Placards were displayed in the neighbourhood of the scaffold, of "windows to be let," even up to the sixth and seventh floors.

 

Caledonian Mercury Monday 9th March 1829

Advertisements & Notices

COUNTRY RESIDENCE IN STIRLINGSHIRE.

To be LET, Furnished,

THE HOUSE of CANDIE, with the Offices, Garden, and Pleasure Grounds, lying in the parish of Muiravonside, within a short distance from the Union Canal and the post road between Linlithgow and Falkirk. The house is genteelly and comfortably furnished, the garden den stocked, and the tenant can be supplied with farm produce. He will have the exclusive right of shooting on the property. Christopher Meikle, at Candie, will show the place and for farther particulars apply to Messrs Ferrier, W. S. Edinburgh.

 

 

1830's

1834

Northampton Mercury Saturday 18th January 1834

Died

At Muiravonside Manse, the Rev. Wm. M'Call, Minister of that parish.

 

Caledonian Mercury  Monday 31st  March 1834

Advertisements & Notices

TO BE SOLD BY PUBLIC ROUP

Within the Royal Exchange Coffeehouse, Edinburgh, on Wednesday the 4th June next, at two o'clock afternoon.

THE LANDS & ESTATE now know by the name of LAURENCE PARK, lying in the Parishes of Muiravonside and Polmont, and county of- Stirling extending to 226 Scotch, or 285 imperial acres, or thereby. The rental, including a valuation put upon some field in the natural possession of the proprietor, including value put on the house and garden, will be upwards of L.700 per annum. The Mansion-House, which is beautifully situated, and commands an extensive view, has been built within these few years, and contains every accommodation suitable for a large family, and has a conservatory communicating with the drawing-room. There are also suitable-offices, and an extensive garden, inclosed with a brick wall, and well stocked with fruit trees and a vinery. The property marches, with the Union Canal, and with the turnpike road leading from Edinburgh to Stirling. The teinds in the parish of Muiravonside are valued and exhausted, and there is an heritable right to the teinds in the parish of Polmont. Entry of the purchaser at Martinmas 1834 - For farther, particulars apply to John L. Learmonth,  Esq. of Parkhall, by Falkirk; and to Alexander Douglas, W.S. 17, Drummond Place, Edinburgh, who is in possession of a plan of-the property, and of the titles.

The HOUSE, completely Furnished, and Garden, at being at present unoccupied will be LET on moderate terms.

Apply as above.

 

Caledonian Mercury -Saturday 24th May 1834

The Rev. James Macfarlane was ordained minister of Muiravonside on the 16th instant, upon which occasion the Rev. Mr. Mackenzie of Borrowstouness preached and presided. The attendance of the congregation was very numerous, and nothing could exceed the cordiality with which the new minister was welcomed by his parishioners. Sunday last Mr. Macfarlane was introduced to his flock by his relative, the Moderator of the present General Assembly, and afterwards preached to an overflowing congregation.

 

Caledonian Mercury Monday 11th August 1834

QUOITING. –

A match took place between Torphichen and Muiravonside, on Monday the 4th inst. at that manly, invigorating, and ancient game, with nine players on each side, for 94 shots. After a close contest between the parties, and much good play exhibited, "by covering the quoit," and driving the paper home, to the pin, the Torphichen players claimed victory by 22 shots.

 

 

 

 

 

1835

Caledonian Mercury Monday 20th  April 1835

Advertisements & Notices

SALE OF BOOKS, PICTURES, PRINTS, SILVER PLATE, GOLD WATCHES, GUNS, CABINETS, SCAGLIOLA TABLE, And Numerous other Articles of Virtu.

MR. C. B. TAIT begs to intimate, that on FRDAY FIRST, and ten following days (Sundays excepted), he will SELL by Auction, in his Great Rooms, No. II, Hanover Street, an extremely Valuable Collection of BOOKS, PICTURES, DRAWINGS, PRINTS, SILVER PLATE, GOLD WATCHES, GUNS, CABINETS, SCAGLIOLA TABLE,BOOKCASE, and numerous other Articles of Virtu; comprising the Library of Alexander Macleod, Esq. of Muiravonside - the Library of a Gentleman lately deceased - a portion of the Stock of a Bookseller – the Silver Plate, Gold Watches, and Snuff Boxes of the s late Alexander Greig, Esq. Accountant - the Drawings and Sketches of Mr. Robert Gibb, S.A. and R.I.A. - the Pictures of the late Alexander Osborn, Esq.Commissioner of the Customs. A Share of the Edinburgh Subscription Library, &c. Catalogues (Part First) of this varied and extensive Sale, are now ready, and may be had on application. 11, Hanover Street,

April 20.

 

1836

Caledonian Mercury Monday 18th January 1836

Advertisements & Notices

STIRLINGSHIRE FOR SALE,

By public roup, within the Old Signet Hall, Royal Exchange, Edinburgh, on Friday 29th inst. at two o'clock afternoon,

  1. THE LANDS of GOOSEDUBS,

 Situated on the banks of the Water of Avon, and lying within the southern part of the parish of Falkirk, but quad sacra in the parish of Slamannan, and county of Stirling. This desirable property has a south exposure, consists of about 100 acres of arable and rich meadow, and about 10 acres of wood. The wood is uncommonly thriving and valuable. The high road from Falkirk runs through the property, and from which place it is distant about three miles, and the proposed Railroad between Edinburgh and Glasgow is likely to pass within a short distance of the property

2. The LANDS of THACKRIDGE,

Lying within the parish of Muiravonside, and county of Stirling. These leans extend to about 28 acres, and are situated about four miles west from Linlithgow, and three from the Union Canal. The tenants will point out the boundaries; and farther particulars will be communicated by James Brown, Esq. Accountant in Edinburgh; Mr. Alexander Monro, writer, Falkirk; MacRitchie, Bayley, & Henderson, W.S. 11, Royal Exchange, Edinburgh, who are in possession of the title-deeds and plans. Edinburgh, 11th January 1836.

 

Newcastle Journal  Saturday 11th & 18th  June 1836

Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser Saturday 25th  June 1836

SUPERINTENDENT OF RAILWAY WANTED.

THE SLAMANNAN RAILWAY COMPANY being about to commence the Formation of the Slamannan Railway, wish to receive Applications by qualified Persons, who may willing fulfill the Office OF RESIDENT ENGINEER when the Work is being executed, and of a SUPERINTENDENT after the Railway is opened for Trade. The Railway extends for about 12 1/2 Miles from the East Extremity of the Ballochney Railway, in the Parish New Monkland and County of Lanark, to the Edinburgh and Glasgow Union Canal at Causewayend, in the Parish of Muiravonside, and County of Stirling. Applicant must be acquainted with Earthwork and Masonry, and the other Operations required in forming and working a Railway, and with making and upholding Bridges, fences, and other Works therewith connected, and must produce satisfactory Testimonials of his Talents and Character. It will be an additional Recommendation that he is acquainted with the Practice of a Surveyor in making Plans and taking Sections, and with the Construction of Locomotive Engines. A Salary of £150 a-year, with a Free House, will be given to a Person duly qualified and preferred to the Situation. Further Particulars may be learned Application to John Macneill, Esq., Civil Engineer, 7, St. Martin's Place, London ; or to the Subscriber, the Clerk of the Company, No. 36, Miller Street, Glasgow ; and Applications, addressed the Company, must be forwarded (Post-paid) to the Care of the Clerk, before Thursday, the 30th Day of June Current.

By Order of the Committee of Management, JAMES MITCHELL, Clerk,

Glasgow, 2nd June, 1836.

 

Caledonian Mercury Monday 12th 14th  & 21st November 1836

Advertisements & Notices

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, THAT application is intended to be made to Parliament, in the ensuing Session, for leave to bring in a BILL or BILLS for making and maintaining a Railway, for the conveyance of Passengers and Goods, and the passage of Coaches, Chaises, Waggons, Carts, and other Carriages, properly constricted, to be drawn or propelled by locomotive engines, steam, or other power, together with Inclined Planes, Viaducts, Bridges, Tunnels, Archways, Depots, Warehouses, Wharfs, Offsets, turning, passing, and loading places, roads, communications, and all proper Works and conveniences connected therewith, to commence at or near to a house or building called the Weigh-house, in the Parish of the High Church of Edinburgh, in the City and County of Edinburgh, and to terminate at or near to the North end of North Queen Street in the Parish of Saint George's, in the City of Glasgow, in the County of Lanark; which said Railway is intended to pass from, in, through, and into the several Parishes, Towns, Burghs, and places following, viz. the City of Edinburgh, the Parishes of High Church, Canongate, Tolbooth, St Andrew's, and St George's-Edinburgh, and Saint Cuthbert's, Corstorphine, Currie, and Ratho, or some of them, all in the County of Edinburgh; the Parish of Kirkliston, in the Counties of Edinburgh and Linlithgow, or one of them; the Parishes of Dalmeny and Abercorn, and the Parish and Burgh of Linlithgow, or some of them, in the County of Linlithgow; the Parishes of Muiravonside and Polmont, the Parish and Burgh of Falkirk, and the Parish of Denny, or some of them, in the County of Stirling; the Parish of Cumbernauld, in the Counties of Stirling and Dumbarton, or one of them; the Parish of Kirkintilloch, in the County of Dumbarton ; the Parishes of Chryston, Cadder, otherwise Calder, Barony-Glasgow, Maryhill Glasgow, Inner High Church-Glasgow, Ramshorn, otherwise St David's -Glasgow, St George's - Glasgow, and the City of Glasgow, or some of them, in the County of Lanark: Also, for making and maintaining a Branch Railway, with proper Works and conveniences connected therewith, to lead from and out of the said last-mentioned Railway, at or near to the house on the north bank of the Edinburgh and Glasgow Union Canal, and near to the west end of the Tunnel on the said Canal, in the Parish of Falkirk and County of Stirling, and to pass in and through the said Parish and Burgh of Falkirk, and to terminate in or near to a certain Field or Garden near to the building called the United Secession Church, in the same Parish of Falkirk, all in the said County of Stirling: And it is intended to apply for power by such Bill, to deviate from the line or lines of the said Railway and Branch Railway respectively, or either of them, as laid out or intended to be laid out end delineated on the Maps or Plans thereof, to be deposited with the Clerks of the Peace for the several Counties before mentioned, to any extent, not exceeding one hundred yards on either side of such line, or lines, where the Property lying within the said distance shall be  included in the said Plans and in the Books of Reference, to be deposited therewith, and also for power to alter vary, and divert highways, roads, tram roads, paths, passages, rivers, canals, brooks, streams, waters; and water-courses.

Dated the 9th day of November 1836.

A. & D. J. BANNAYTYNE, - Solicitors for the Bill.

 

 

1837

Caledonian Mercury Thursday 18th & 26th October 1837

Advertisements & Notices

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, THAT application to Parliament is intended to be renewed or made, in the ensuing Session, for leave to bring in a Bill, or Bills, for making and maintaining a Railway from Edinburgh to Glasgow, with a Branch therefrom to Falkirk, for the conveyance of passengers and goods, and the passage of coaches, chaises, waggons, carts, and other carriages, properly constructed, to be drawn or propelled by locomotive engines, steam, or other power, together with, inclined planes, viaducts, bridges, tunnels, archways, depots, warehouses, wharfs, offsets, turning, passing, and loading places, roads, communications, and all proper works and conveniences connected therewith; which said Railway is intended to commence at or near to a place called the Haymarket, situated in the Parish of St. Cuthbert's, or St George's, Edinburgh, in the County, or City, and County of Edinburgh, and to terminate at or near to the North end of North Queen Street, in the Parish of St George's in the City of Glasgow, in tbe County of Lanark, and is intended to pass from, in, through, or into the several Parishes, Cities, Towns, Burghs, and places following, viz. the aforesaid City of Edinburgh, and Parish of St George's, Edinburgh, and the Parishes of St Cuthbert's, Corstorphine, Currie, and Ratho, or some of them, all in the County of Edinburgh; the Parish of Kirkliston, in the Counties of Edinburgh and Linlithgow or one of them ; the Parishes of Uphall, Dalmeny, and Abercorn. and the Parish and Burgh of Linlithgow, or some of them, in the County of Linlithgow; the Parishes of Muiravonside and Polmont, the Parish and Burgh of Falkirk, and the Parish of Denny, or some of them, in the County of Stirling; the Parish of Cumbernauld, in the Counties of Stirling and Dumbarton, or one of them; the Parish of Kirkintilloch, in the County of Dumbarton; the Parishes of Chryston, Cadder, otherwise Calder, Barony-Glasgow, Maryhill-Glasgow, Inner High Church-Glasgow Ramshorn, otherwise St David's- Glasgow, and the aforesaid Parish of St George's Glasgow, and City of Glasgow, or some of them in the County of Lanark: And which said Branch Railway is intended to lead from and out of the said last mentioned Railway, at or near to the House on the North Bank of the Edinburgh and Glasgow Union Canal near to the West end of the Tunnel on the said Canal, in the said Parish of Falkirk, and County of Stirling, and to pass in and through the said Parish and Burgh of Falkirk, and to terminate in or near to a certain field or garden near to the building called the United Secession Church, in the said Parish of Falkirk, all in the said County of Stirling: And it is intended to apply for power by such Bill or Bills, to deviate the line or lines of the said Railway and Branch Railway respectively, or either of them, as laid out or intended to be laid out and delineated on the maps or plans thereof, to be deposited as after-mentioned to the extent of one hundred yards, except where passing through any town, and in such cases, to the extent of ten yards on either side of such line or lines, provided the lands or property included within the limits of such deviation, shall be marked upon the said maps or plans. And also, for power to alter, vary, and divert  highways, roads, tramroads, paths, passages, rivers, canals, brooks, streams, waters, and water courses, where requisite for the construction of the said Railway, or Branch Railway, and Works, and to levy tolls, rates, and duties, on and for the use of the said Railway, and Branch  Railway, and Works, aforesaid. And it is intended that Maps or Plans, and Sections, describing the line and levels of the said intended Railway, and Branch Railway, said the lands to be taken for the purposes thereof, together with Books of Reference thereto, containing the names of the reputed Owners, Lessees and Occupiers of such lands, shall be deposited on or before the 30th day of November eighteen hundred and thirty-seven, in the offices of the principal Sheriff- Clerks, as follows; that is to say, in the City of Edinburgh, for the said County, and City and County of Edinburgh; at Linlithgow for the said County of Linlithgow; at Stirling, and also at Falkirk, for the said County of Stirling; at Dumbarton, for the said County of Dumbarton; and at Lanark, and also at Glasgow, for the said County of Lanark: And it is also intended to deposit, on or before the said thirtieth day of November, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-seven, with the schoolmaster, if any; and if there shall be no Schoolmaster, then with the Session-Clerk of each of the said several Parishes through which the said Railway, and Branch Railway, are respectively intended to be made, at their respective residences, and also with the Town Clerk of each of the said Burghs of Edinburgh, Linlithgow, Falkirk, and Glasgow, at their respective offices within the said Burghs, a copy of so much of the said Maps or Plans, and Sections, as relates to each of the said several Parishes and Burghs, together with a Book of Reference thereto.

A. & D. J. BANNATYNE, Solicitors to the Bill.

SWAIN, STEVENS, & CO. Parliamentary Solicitors.

Glasgow, September 14, 1637.

1839

The Operative Sunday 10th February 1839

Glasgow, September 14, 1637.

DISTRESSING ACCIDENT.-

Upon Tuesday last, while the workmen were employed at the commencement of the Glasgow and Edinburgh Railway, at Muiravonside, the bank gave way, and fell upon nine men, two of whom were killed. One is a young man, about eighteen years of age; the other has left a widow and three children. Another account says, "When dug out, one of them was dead, and the other, though alive, is so dreadfully bruised, that little or no hope is entertained of his recovery.

"Glasgow Chronicle.”

1840's

1840

Caledonian Mercury Saturday 21st March 1840

Births

At the Manse of Muiravonside, on the 14th current, Mrs. MACFARLAN, of a daughter.

 

Caledonian Mercury  Monday 4th  May 1840

Advertisements and Notices

UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH.

LIST of the HONOURS AWARDED in the several FACULTIES and CLASSES FOR SESSION MDCCCXXXIX-XL. FACULTY OF ARTS.

HUMANITY CLASSES.

JUNIOR CLASS.

I. Latin Verses,

2. James Wardrop, Muiravonside

SECOND CLASS

II. For a Translation of the Menexellus of Plato.

James Wardrop, Muiravonside ;

1841

Caledonian Mercury Monday 18th January 1841

Advertisements & Notices

NOTICE.

 THE TRUSTEES of the 7th DISTRICT of STIRLINGSHIRE, comprehending the Parishes of Polmont and Muiravonside, and part of Bothkennnar, intend to borrow the Sum of One Hundred Pounds on the Security of the Funds leviable by virtue of the Parish, Road Act to be applied in repairing the Highways within the said district; of which notice is hereby given in terms of the said Act.

 THOs GIRDWOOD, Clerk to the Trustees.

Polmont, 15th Jan. 1841.

 

1842

Caledonian Mercury Monday 26th  December 1842

LIST OF MINISTERS who have concurred in the Second Series of Resolutions adopted by the late Convocation, since the publication of the memorial to her Majesty's Government.

(Amongst whom was)

Mr. James M'Farlane, Muiravonside

1843

Morning Post  Tuesday 4th  April 1843

THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND. –

We have been favoured with a letter from the Rev. James M'Farlane, Minister of Muiravonside, dated "Muiravonside Manse, Linlithgow, 23d March, 1843," requesting us to announce that he has "withdrawn from the Convocation, because they refuse to accept a settlement on the principle of the Liberum Arbitrium, plainly offered by Parliament, when their spiritual jurisdiction would be sufficiently secure."-  Edinburgh Constitutional.- l am in a condition to inform you, that when the Convocationists have seceded from the Establishment, we shall receive the most zealous and efficient assistance, both from the Roman Catholic journals and Members of Ireland, in our efforts to crush that Establishment. - London Correspondent of the Dundee Warder.

 

Caledonian Mercury Monday 3rd April 1843

Advertisements & Notices

LANDS IN TIHE COUNTIES OF LINLITHGOW, STIRLING, & EDINBURGH.

Upset Prices Reduced. To be SOLD by public roup, within Stevenson's Sale Rooms, Royal Exchange, Edinburgh, on Wednesday the 12th day of April next, betwixt two and three o'clock afternoon, if not previously disposed of by private bargain,

THE LANDS OF DRUMCROSS AND GATESIDE, lying in the parish of Bathgate and shire of Linlithgow.

ALSO,

 The LANDS of BLACKRIGG, lying in the parish of Muiravonside and shire of Stirling.

The Lands extend to 47I acres imperial measure or thereby, and lie within four miles of the market town of Falkirk, and little more than a mile of the Slamannan Railway. There is a suitable Steading, and the Lands are surrounded by the well-known Coal Fields of Parkhall and Standrigg, where coal is now being wrought; and there is no doubt the seams of coal now wrought there extend under the greater part of  the property. The Lands are at present let from year to year.

The following PROPERTIES in the COUNTY of EDINBURGH:-

Entry to the Premises at Whitsunday next, or sooner, if purchasers incline. And, as all these Properties must be peremptorily sold off immediately, the Upset Prices will be fixed at low rates.

For particulars apply to Mr. Thomas Bauchope, Brucefield ; Alexander Stevenson, Heriot Row ; or to Messrs Young, Aytoun, & Rutherford, Nelson Street, in whose custody the articles of roup and title deeds will be found.

 

Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette 1st June, Leicester Journal 2nd June, Northhampton Mercury; West Kent Guardian; Kendal Mercury Saturday 3rd June 1843

A labourer of the name of Allan Mair, about 82 years of age, residing at Candyen, near Avon-bridge, in this county, was apprehended last week on a charge of murder, perpetrated under the following circumstances: —It appears that on the morning of Sunday, the 14th instant, a quarrel arose between him and an old woman who lived with him as his wife, concerning some trifling circumstance, when he swore at her and beat her dreadfully on the head, arms, and chest with a large stick. The neighbours, hearing her cries, ran to the spot to render her assistance, but Mair, on learning their intention, with horrid imprecations, threatened to shoot anyone who should approach. They were thus compelled to desist, as he was known to be a reckless person and to possess firearms. In the morning, however, information was given to the police, who proceeded to the house, and finding the woman very ill in bed, immediately took Mair into custody. Her arms and chest were dreadfully lacerated, and her head bruised; and the injuries altogether of a nature so severe that she lingered in great agony till early on Tuesday morning, when she died. A post mortem examination of the body immediately took place, and we understand the report of the medical gentlemen was, that the woman died in consequence of the injuries she received. Mair has been examined by the Sheriff and fully committed to Stirling gaol on a charge of murder.— Stirling Advertiser.

 

London Standard Tuesday 19th September; Morning Post Thursday 21st September;

Lincolnshire Chronicle Friday 22nd September; Sheffield Independent Saturday 23rd September;

Northern Star Saturday 23rd September 1843

MURDER BY A MAN 84 YEARS OF AGE AUTUMN JUSTICIARY CIRCUIT Stirling, Sept. 13.

Allan Mair was accused of the murder of Mary Fletcher, or Mair, his wife, on the night of Sunday the 14th, or morning of Monday, the 15th May last, within his house, at Candiend or Curshort, in the parish of Muiravonside, and county of Stirling, in so far as he did, with a stick, or other weapon, beat and abuse the said Mary Mair, of which injuries she came by her death. He pleaded Not Guilty. Helen Bennie or Nimmo. - Knows Mair, and identified him. Mair came to reside there in May, 1842. Had a woman that had stopped with him 30 years. Heard her say so on the 14th May last. She passed as his reputed wife. Her name was Mary Fletcher. She died on the 16th May, at four o'clock. Witness was with her when she died, and was in the constant habit of seeing her since she came to reside there. Visited her once or twice a-day. Told witness she was 85 years old. Looked fully that age. Deceased could not walk well - had got a hurt in her back. Deceased never was unwell but once while there, and this was about the new year. Said that she did not get her victuals as she ought from Mair. Said so in Mair's presence. Panel gave deceased some abusive language, and wished she was in hell and her soul burning. Never knew them want victuals in the house, but he kept them locked up. Many a time he starved her, but witness always gave her something to eat, and some of the neighbours did so too; but this was always done when panel was out. Deceased seemed a well-disposed person. Mair always abused her, and heard him often wish she was dead. Deceased often said, “Oh, Allan, we could live like the king on the throne, although we are poor, if you were good to me." Had seen the panel strike her about three weeks before, on a Tuesday, with a spade, when she was on the ground. The deceased was crying murder. Panel was swearing at her. Witness called prisoner an old cruel villain. The deceased cried like a child. Saw her on the14th May at seven at night, and gave her some supper. She was then in her usual state, and took her victuals hearty. Witness was in bed, and heard the clock strike 11, when Jean Letham came to the door and knocked. She told me something that made me get up and put on my clothes, and go with her, and I beard the cry of murder. Knew deceased's voice. Heard the strokes. Was distant a few yards. Heard the cries repeated, and the blows continued. I went to the door. The blows were very heavy, like the blows of a hammer. When witness was at the front, she heard deceased say to Mair, "Let me lie, and die in peace, and don't strike me anymore." Panel said he would make her put in the sneck of the bed, and then he would let her alone. Deceased said she could not do it, as she could not see. He said he would put her hand to it. Panel said she would need to undergo the punishment. Witness then heard blows and cries of murder. Witness cried to Panel to let her alone; but he said, whoever it was he would blow their brains out with a pistol. The people at the door were Thomas and Jane Letham. A Witness heard him say, "I will make you glad to put in the sneck, and the wedding is just beginning." Heard blows and cries of murder again. Panel said he did not care although all the ministers and elders were there, he would make her put in the sneck. It was a box bed. He was in bed. Heard him get out of bed, when he threatened to shoot. I went to Letham's, as they had gone into their own house when he threatened to shoot. Still heard cries of murder. Letham came to his own door, and wanted me to go for my husband. Only a wall divides Letham's house and pannel's. Heard the cries of murder continued, and did not see Letham go to Mair's house. Still heard the blows, and panel telling ber to put in the sneck. When I went home it was about half- past one. Saw her next morning about seven. Panel opened the door and said that deceased had been fighting with the bed doors all night, and breaking them. Witness spoke mildly to him, as she was afraid, and asked him what ailed him and her. Panel said he had got no sleep with her smashing them. Said he was going down to the manse with the key, and to tell the minister to make a snuff box of Mary, his wife. Witness had taken some tea for her, and went to bed, but did not see her, and asked him what be had done with her, as she was not there. Panel swore at her, and said, "Where could she be?" -Witness looked again, and she was crouched up at the foot of the bed. She had a cap on, and an old piece of cotton cloth about her shoulders. The front of her shift was all blood. Her arms were bare. Saw a deal of blood about the bed. When I offered her the tea, she was not able to lift her right hand, but could move the other. She took some of it, and pointed to Allan, and said it was he that did that, meaning the bruises that she had got. I sent for a police officer, who came on the Monday at night, and took the panel into custody. Deceased was alive at that time, but thought she died of the wounds received, as she was in good health previously. Dr. Girdwood read a paper of the examination held upon the body. The statement bears that the injuries inflicted were the immediate cause of her death. Mr. Logan, in a speech of great ability, contended that the panel was insane in regard to his conduct towards his wife, although his reason, in other respects, might not be affected. Lord Moncrieff having summed up at considerable length, the jury retired, and after an absence of 20 minutes returned, bringing in a unanimous verdict of Guilty as libeled. His lordship then addressed the prisoner, who is 84 years of age, in a very impressive manner, and sentenced him to be executed here on Wednesday, the 4th of October, between the hours of eight and ten, and his body to be interred within the precincts of the gaol.

 

Hull Packet Friday 13th October; Cork Examiner Friday 13th October; Leeds Times Saturday 14th October; Reading Mercury Saturday 14th October; Westmorland Gazette Saturday 21st October 1843

EXECUTION OF AN OCTOGENARIAN MURDERER.—AWFUL SCENE.

Stirling, Thursday Night. Yesterday, the wretched culprit, Allan Mair, who was in his 84th year, convicted at the last Stirling Circuit before Lord Moncrieff, on very clear evidence, of the wilful murder of Mary. Fletcher, his reputed wife, aged 85, the month of May last, in the village of Candie-end, in the parish of Muiravonside, by beating her to death with a stick or some heavy substance, was executed at the usual hour in front of the Court-house. The execution was attended by circumstances of most appalling character, and has produced a very painful sensation throughout the whole of this part of Scotland. As the morning approached on which he was to terminate his existence, he became more quiet and resigned, but still appeared to be impressed with feelings of the most inveterate detestation of the witnesses on his trial. On Tuesday evening, being that previous to his execution, he appeared calm and thoughtful, and seemed to be endeavouring to restrain his grief. He was engaged in religious exercises with the Rev. Messrs. Watson and Stark till nearly 10 o'clock, when they retired. He remained very quiet for a considerable time, and then fell into a profound sleep, about 11 o'clock. About awoke, and, hearing the noise made by the workmen in erecting the scaffold, anxiously inquired the occasion of the noise, and immediately added "O, ay, they're putting up the gibbet. What a horrible thing to be hanged like a dog T" He then fell into a disturbed sleep, from which the striking of every hour awoke him, and he would exclaim, “That’s an hour less I've to live. About 5 o'clock yesterday morning be awoke from his disturbed slumbers, when one of tbe men who kept watch over him read some portions of Scripture, and conversed with him on religious subjects. A little after 5 o'clock he was waited upon by the Rev. Mr. Stark, who proposed to read some tracts to him which had been put into his hands for that purpose, but the unhappy man would hear none of them, and vehemently told Mr. Stark to " gang awa' wi' his tracts. He didna want to hear them. He seemed to be very ill-tempered, and repeatedly declared his intention of addressing the people from the scaffold, in order to let them know how unjustly he had been treated, and this resolution no persuasion could shake. As the hour approached he became very restless, and on leaving the cell was very much, agitated and wept bitterly. He had previously declared his resolution not to walk, and had accordingly to be supported by two men, who led him into the Court-House, which he entered about a quarter past 8 o'clock, and was received by the Provost and magistrates, along with the Rev. Messrs. Stark and Leitch.' The unhappy man was bent almost double, and appeared to be much more feeble than he was at the time of his trial. He was weeping bitterly—the tears streaming down his cheeks and from between his bony fingers, which he pressed upon his face. He was set down at the green table, when Mr. Leitch gave out eight lines of the 51st Psalm, during the singing of which the poor old man sobbed long and convulsively, rocking himself backward and forward, and was evidently much overcome. Mr. Leitch then addressed him solemnly and affectingly, quoting passages of Scripture applicable to the melancholy situation in which he was placed, after which Mr. Stark offered up most impressive prayer. After the exercises had been concluded, a glass of wine was brought to him, but he resolutely refused it, declaring that he would not go into the presence of God Almighty drunk." Here the executioner, who was singularly attired in a light jacket and trousers, seamed with red and black, and a huge black crape mask, entered the room, on seeing whom, Mair started back, and every limb appeared to quiver with the intensity of his excitement. The executioner then advanced to pinion him; but shrank away, evidently alarmed at his approach. On the rope being passed round his arms, he complained that it was hurting him. "O dinna hurt me," said he,” dinna hurt me, I'm auld—l'll mak nae resistance. An' O ! when I gang to the gibbet, dinna keep me lang—just fling me aff at once." After some difficulty he was pinioned, and the mournful procession being formed, he was led out between two officers to the scaffold. On emerging from the Court house, and when the gibbet and the immense crowd met his gaze, he held down his head, and groaned piteously, lifting up his hands and ejaculating, “Oh Lord Oh, Lord !" He was instantly led to the drop, but he declared he was unable to stand; and, he had expressed resolution to address the multitude, a chair was brought for him. On sitting down, he appeared to gather additional strength and resolution, and addressed the crowd in the following awful and revolting manner: I hope you will listen attentively to what I am now about to say to you, as this is the first time I have been permitted to tell mind to the public. I have been most unjustly condemned through false swearing; and here I pray that God may send his curse upon all connected with my trial—l curse the witnesses with all the curses of the 109th  psalm. There is one person connected with the parish who brought in fake witnesses to condemn an innocent man. When in prison this person came to visit me, but I told him that it was a wonder the God of heaven did not rain down fire and brimstone upon him, as he did upon Sodom and Gomorrah. He it was who brought false witnesses against me, who brought Roman Catholics, who worship stocks and stones, and others, to swear away life—but God will curse and eternally d— n him! They told me that witnesses would be got to defend me; but no one appeared, and I was left to the mercy of false swearers. I wished them to allow me to get paper drawn up of what my little house contained, so that the articles might be sold, but they would not let me. If they had I would have got witnesses myself, and I would not have been here to-day." After going on in a similar strain for minute or two, he paused for a little space, upon which the executioner, thinking he had concluded, stepped towards him, and inquired if he was done No, Sir, am not done!" replied he warmly, lifting up his clinched hand and striking it violently upon his knee, " I'm not done; I'll say much more if they will allow me. Before this multitude, in whose presence I am to be sent into eternity, there to appear before God, I declare I am innocent. And do you think [raising his voice to a high pitch] would appear before Christ' with a lie in my mouth I have been unjustly accused, falsely sworn against, and unlawfully condemned. I say these things that the people from my parish, when they return home, may tell those who have so sworn against me what I have said regarding them, and how my curse was poured out upon them. The moment I am thrown into eternity may their plagues commence —may they be eternally blasted! My most fervent hope is, that the Almighty God may speedily and everlastingly d—n them !" In this appalling manner did the wretched old man continue for about five minutes more to address the people assembled, whose feelings of sympathy soon changed into subdued shouts of horror and detestation. The depravity of mind which his awful imprecations evinced, and the feelings of vengeance which seemed to absorb his whole faculties at so awful a moment, instead having the effect intended on his hearers as to his asseverations of innocence, had quite a different j one, for one and all seemed to feel that the wretched being who was capable of uttering all they had heard had gone far to prove in their own presence that he was capable of perpetrating the awful crime which had been brought home to him. The Rev. Mr. Leitch then offered up a most fervent and impressive prayer, which appeared to touch the heart of every one except that of the unhappy person in whose behalf mercy was supplicated. After prayer Mr. Leitch bade him farewell, when he stretched out his hand, saying, Farewell, Sir, farewell. I'll soon be in eternity." The executioner then put the cap on the old man's head, adjusted the rope, and placed the signal handkerchief his hand. At this time he was sitting in the chair on the drop, and although the cap was drawn over his face, continued muttering his anathemas against all who had connexion with his trial. He was then desired to rise from the chair, in order that it might be removed, but he replied that he could not wept piteously, and while the act of exclaim "May God be —" the fatal bolt was withdrawn, and the wretched old man, uttering a heavy groan was launched into eternity. For moment he raised one of his hands, which had not been properly pinioned the back of his neck, seized the rope convulsively' and endeavoured to save himself, but his grasp instantly relaxed, and after struggling violently for some tune he ceased to exist. After hanging for the usual time, the body was lowered into a coffin, and removed to a cell, where cast was taken of the head. The body was then buried the passage leading into the court-yard. The crowd assembled to witness the execution was very large, and appeared to be composed chiefly persons from the country, among whom were a great number of women.

 

Caledonian Mercury Monday 4th December 1843

Advertisements & Notices

VALUABLE COLLIERY IN THE COUNTY OF STIRLING FOR SALE.

To be SOLD by public roup, within the Old Signet Hall, Royal Exchange, Edinburgh, on Tuesday the 5th day of December 1843, at two o'clock the afternoon, Upset Price L.5600, THAT well-known COLLIERY of STANDRIGG, in the parish of Muiravonside, and county of Stirling, with the COLLIER HOUSES, CHAR KILNS, THREE STEAM ENGINES, and other VALUABLE MACHINERY of the most approved description, and recently erected at great cost, being in the best possible order, and at present in operation; together with a QUANTITY of CAST-METAL RAILS, above and under ground, and a LOT of NEW PUMPS of considerable size. The Coalfield consists of two seams, one of splint ln and the other of soft coal. The splint has been wrought to a considerable extent, and to great advantage, and consists of about 32 acres. The soft coal consists of above 60 acres, and both seams are about three feet in thickness, of very superior quality, and of great value. The Coal is well known in Edinburgh, where it has met with an extensive sale for several years, and it also commands a ready market in the populous neighbourhood adjoining the Colliery, including the towns of Falkirk, Laurieston, Polmont, &c. It is also shipped to advantage at the port of Grangemouth. The Union Canal and Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway both pass within a short distance of the Colliery, and there is a wharf on the Canal at which the Coals are shipped. To a person of skill and experience as a Coalmaster, this Colliery would yield a handsome annual return. The works have only been carried on to a limited extent for the last two years, and though under the most unfavourable circumstances, the profit arising therefrom has been considerable. The output of Coal might be increased to double the present quantity, and would yield a profit of from L.1400 to L.1560 a year. 21 Farther particulars may be learned on application to

Mr. Alexander Macfarlane, of Thornhill, Falkirk; Mr. Henry Salmon, Falkirk; Messrs Davidson & Syme, W.S. Edinburgh; or to Mr. John Archd. Campbell, C.S. Edinburgh.

November 24, 1843.

 

1844

Glasgow Herald Monday 29th  January 1844

At Ballure Cottage. Argyllshire, on the 17th inst., Clementina, eldest surviving daughter of Charles Lockhart and Elizabeth Macdonald, of Muiravonside, and Largie.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 25th April 1844

AVONBRIDGE SCHOOL.

A letter in this paper of the 28th ultimo, in reference to the treatment of a female teacher, in the parish of Larbert, leads us to notice the almost parallel position of affairs as regards Avonbridge School. Some years ago a tack was granted of a piece of ground to four parties - "Managers of Avonbridge School Society, for behoof of themselves and the other Members of the said Society, present and future, and to their asignees," for the period of 999 years after Whitsunday, 1837. Mr William Bryce Garvie having been introduced as teacher of the school erected on the piece of ground so leased, has continued to discharge his duties with most exemplary assiduity and faithfulness, marked by eminent success among his pupils, whose proficiency is unquestioned. About two years ago, a small section of oppositionists to Mr. Garvie sprung up, and would, latterly, fain expel him from his office. Two or three of the tacksmen, and the great majority of the members and subscribers to the school, and of the parents and guardians of children attending thereat, and heads of families in the district, continue warmly attached to Mr. Garvie, and the attendance of pupils goes on increasingly prosperous. The oppositionists, failing in an attempt to expel Mr. Garvie, at Whitsunday, 1843, introduced a rival teacher, to starve Mr. G. out, as was said; but Mr. Garvie's success not having been affected by this device, the rival shared the fate intended for Mr. G. The small knot of oppositionists, and a precious, and partly a notorious, portion of the Church Residuary, recently laid their sage heads together to effect Mr. G.s expulsion. He was asked to do what it was previously known he would not do, viz., subscribe, implicitly, the Westminster Confession of Faith. What greater crime could he be guilty of than refuse this so sectarian request! The knot, unknown to the lessees and the bulk of members patronising the school, advertised for candidates for the office of teacher, to appear on the 25th ult. On that day the knot and a trio of the Church-Residuary, (Messrs Davidson of Slamannan, Macfarlane of Muiravonside, and Brancks of Torphichen,) with Mr. Cuthbertson, preacher at Avonbridge, met there to examine candidates, and elect a successor to Mr. Garvie. In limine objections were stated to the title of the clergymen to appear or examine, and to the contemplated proceedings in toto. In vain was it urged the clergymen had no status there - that it was ultra vires in them to interfere - that the lessees being against the proceedings, rendered them null - that at all events the great bulk of the school supporters and members being against the proceedings, and determined to retain Mr. Garvie, the threatened proceedings should be quashed. The reverend gentlemen, most reverently sagacious, said these objections were all irrelevant, and of this the minister of Slamanan was certain! In vain was a protest taken. The knot proceeded making a minute of their own, representing their sentiments only, and excluding everything urged by several of the lessees, and by the members, or their mandatories, if favourable to Mr. G. Thus the latter, in defence, held themselves as constituting the meeting, while the former proceeded, and it is supposed, went through the farce of electing a teacher to terrify away Mr. G. Since then the knot has raised a process of removing, before the Sheriff, against Mr. G. at the instance - aye, at the instance of whom? - Of the tacksmen? No. Of the whole members, or a majority? No; but at the instance of six individuals, as "a majority of the committee of management," pretended to have been named. The other four are in favour of Mr. G., together with one of those named as pursuers, his name being so used unauthorisedly, and who accordingly disclaims the action. Another name, it is said, is used likewise without authority. Thus the pretended committee is equally divided at least, or rather, probably, six against the action, and four for it!! Even if otherwise, however, is such conduct correct? So late as November, 1842, the resident Dissenting clergyman (Mr. Craig) at Avonbridge, warmly applauded Mr. G. by a holograph testimonial - while prior to that date, and even since, the minister of Muiravonside was equally warm in his favours towards Mr. G. But as even the Avonbridge folks have their ideas of Church politics, and are more attached to nonintrusion than otherwise, and as some folks, even though changelings, like to show their zeal, it seems the Church in the district is thought to require all her nurseries - must guard all her outposts - thence it is said the school must belong to the Church! Is it possible so absurd an idea can be cherished ? We know it has been said. We shall see. Now, Mr. Editor, through the columns of your paper, I hope the facts related may appear unobscured by that eye-film of intolerant, narrow sectarianism which doubtless dims and darkens the visual organs of parties, (who know, and ought to know better.) when in their own rural district, and if so, two wise purposes will be served - litigious fools will save their money from the cormorant maw of the knights of the quill, and Mr. Garvie will be left in happy quiet to teach the young idea how to grow.

Communicated.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 18th April 1844

FARM TO LET.

THE FARM of GREENKNOWES, in the parish of Muiravonside, containing about 90 Acres Scotch measure, or thereby, presently occupied by Wm. Johnstone, will be Let, for such number of years as may be agreed on, and entered to at Martinmas first. The Farm is judiciously laid out, and is well watered and sheltered. The soil is excellent and suited for all kinds of crops; and the steading is commodious and mostly slated. The Towns of Falkirk, Linlithgow, and Bathgate at each of which there is a weekly grain market are within short distances: the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway and Union Canal pass within a mile of the lands, and a station of the Slamannan Railway adjoins them, thereby affording great facilities for sending the farm produce to market, and procuring a plentiful supply of manure; and Lime of a good quality is to be had in the neighbourhood at a moderate price. Thomas Duncan, at Greenknowes, will point out the boundaries; and the conditions of set and farther particulars may be learned by applying to Messrs Hutton, Writers, Stirling; with whom offers in writing must be lodged on or before the 7th day of June next.

Greenknowes, 10th April, 1844.

 

Stirling Observer 2nd May 1844

COAL AND FEU-DUTIES FOR SALE.

To be Sold, by Public Roup, within the Red Lion Inn, Falkirk, upon THURSDAY the 30th day of May, 1844, at One o'Clock Afternoon, the following Subjects belonging to the Sequestrated Estate of the late William Johnston, of Meadowbank,

1.THE COAL, IRONSTONE, and other MINERALS, within All and Whole that portion of the Muir of Muiravonside, formerly called Wainrigg, now Moss-side, effeiring to the Lands of Easter Candy, lying within the parish of Muiravonside, and County of Stirling.

 2. All right competent to the Estate of the said William Johnston, in the Coal, Ironstone, and other Minerals within the Weedings Moss, which right is understood to extend to upwards of 8 acres of the said Minerals.

3. A FEU-DUTY of £2. 10s., and another Feu-duty of 5s. 3d. per annum, with several smaller sums, payable to Mr Johnston's Estate, from Property in Redding.

4. A small STRIPE of GROUND adjoining the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway, and on the North side of the road leading from Redding to Maddiston.

Further particulars will be learned on application to Mr. James Russel, Jun., Banker, Falkirk; Messrs Nairne & Bertram. W.S., Edinburgh; or Messrs Russel & Aitken, Writers, Falkirk.

 

Stirling Observer  Thursday 6th June 1844

EASTERN DISTRICT OF STIRLINGSHIRE AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION.

 "Thursday between the terms" is one of the famous fairs for which Falkirk has long been familiar to all the famers in and around one of the finest grain districts in Scotland. On 30th ult., however the interest of the occasion was vastly enhanced in consequence of its being the day fixed judiciously by the committee of our excellently conducted and now influential Association, for the Show that has been look forward with no little anticipatory interest. From the list of premiums, it was certainly to be argued that a grand test would be afforded of the importance of the carses and moorlands of Falkirk, as fitted to produce cattle and horses for agricultural and other purposes second to no other in this country; and certainly the result has completely borne out our previous asseverations of what would be achieved by the united exertions of a body of enlightened gentlemen such as form the nucleus of our Association, backed as they are by the devoted, intelligent, and well-directed doings of our long-renowned farmers, both proprietors and tenants. While tile-draining and guano are at work underhand, to exhibit by and bye the rearing grain fields that are destined to insure an abundant sickle work, it is pleasing to see that the agriculturists all over our neighbourhood are wide awake to the importance of rearing stock. We have heard some carping theorist, with all the over-caution that resisted, long ago, improvements and reforms among the famers, urge that the business of cattle-breeding, and the production of fat stock, was less an affair of real excellence than to exhibit what amount of good could be got from poor feeding, alias an "empty stall." Now, taking it all over-head, while the rich resources of our carses, and the more favoured of our moorland farm-steads, are able to turn out the very best animals, we take it that others follow in the wake with a bright encouragement before them, and, as will be seen from the award of the judges, very oft with signal success over their more favoured competitors. No. no, let the thing take its full sweep, and there is little fear but ultimately a taste, if no more, will extent itself, fitted to develop the energies and capabilities of even our poorest soils. We must hasten to our immediate business, however, and seldom upon any previous occasion have we had the pleasure of recording altogether a more successful Show, even after the many creditable exhibitions that have crowned the continued purpose of the Society. We are necessarily precluded, from mere want of space, from offering a few observations which we intended, not only on the individual appearances of the splendid animals shown, but on the peculiar aptitude of certain localities in the eastern district of Stirlingshire to produce stock, which is now at the top of the list of all similar produce, and was long previously known and appreciated.

 AYRSHIRE BREED –

 For the best Bull of any age, under 5 years old, Mr. Rennie. Craigburn; for the second best do., Mr. James Jarvie, Greencraig.

For the best two-year-old Bull, Mr. Reid, Hainingvalley; for the second best do., Mr. Andrew Taylor, Broomage.

 For the best Cow having a calf this season, or near calving, Mr. Reid, Hainingvalley; for the second best do., Mr. Reid, Hainingvalley; for the third best do., Mr. Coubrough, Thorn.

For the 3 best Cows out of one byre, Mr. Reid, Hainingvalley; for the second bet do., Mr. Dobbie, Seamores.

For the best Cow bred in the district. Mr. Rennie, Craigburn; for the second best do., Mr. Dobhie, Seamores; for the third best do., Mr. Rennie, Craigburn.

For the best two-year-old Quey, in milk, or near calving, Mr. Dobbie. Seamores; for the second best do., Mr. Rennie, Craigburn.

For the best two-year-old Quey not in calf. Mr. Stirling of Glenbervie.

For the best pair of do. Mr. Stirling of Glenbervie; for the second best pair of do., Mr. Reid, Hainingvalley.

For the best year-old Quey, Mr. Rennie, Craigburn; for the Second best do.. Mr. Rennie, Craigburn ; for the third best do., Mr. Rennie, Craigburn.

For the best pair of do., Mr. Calender of Woodbum; for the second best pair of do., Mr. Stirling of Glenbervie; for the third best pair of do. Mr. Stirling of Glenbervie.

For the best yearling Bull, Mr. Rennie, Cragburn ; for the second best do. Mr. John Borthwick, jun. Kerse; for the third best do ,Mr. Arthur, Pirleyhill.

For the best Bull Calf, Mr Stirling, Glenbervie; for the second best do. Mr. Wm. Nelson, Green wells.

For the best Quey Calf, Mr. Rennie, Craigburn; for the second best do., Mr Stirling, Glenbervie.

HORSES. –

For the best brood Mare for agricultural purposes, foaled, or to foal. Mr. Stirling, Glenbervie; for the second best do., Mr. Reid Hainingvalley.

For the best brood Mare, not in milk, Mr. Michael Smith, Falkirk; for the second best do, Mr. Wilson, Nicolton; for the third best do., Mr. Forbes of Callendar.

For the best three-year-old Filly, Mr. J. Borthwick, jun. ; for the second best do., Mr. Reid.

For the best two-year-old Colt, Mr. Forbes; for the second best do., Mr. Bowie, Gilmeadowland.

For the best two-year old Filly, Mr. Stark, Camelon; for the second best do., Mr. Rennie.

For the best yearling Colt, Mr. James Jarvie.

For the best yearling Filly, Mr. Robert Bowie.

SWINE –

For the best Boar, in full condition, and having produced stock, Mr. Forbes.

For the best brood Sow, in pig, or having littered, Mr. Forbes; for the second best do, Mr. Forbes. BUTTER –

For the best 8 lbs of Fresh Butter, produced in the district, and made up in half-pound rolls, Mr. John Neilson, farmer, Crossgatehead; for the second best do., Mr. Stark farmer, Westerglen; for the third best do., Mr. Arthur, Pirleyhill; for the fourth best do., Mr. Clark of Newlands [The Butter shown by Mr. Neilson was, superb, and does great credit to the dairy of Crossgatehead. and the superior management of Mrs. Neilson. The cows are all fair grass fed, with the addition of a little bean meal.]

SWEEPSTAKES - AYRSHIRE BREED.-

For the best pair of yearling Queys, open to all members, Mr. Rennie.

For the best yearling Bull, Mr. Rennie.

After the more immediate business of the day, the annual dinner took place in the Red Lion Inn. The chair was appropriately filled by Chas. Stirling, Esq. of Muiravonside the President of the Society; Sylvester D. Stirling. Esq. of Glenbervie, our energetic agriculturist, doing the duties of croupier, with all his wonted spirit and tact. We have only to congratulate all parties on the bright results of this very interesting and most excellent Show.

 

Fife Herald Thursday 25th July 1844

BOARD IN ST ANDREWS. MRS. GRAHAM, Widow of the late Alex. Graham, Surgeon, Polmont, having Removed to SOUTH STREET, ST. ANDREWS, is desirous to receive into her Family a few BOYS as BOARDERS, to attend the Madras College. Tutors - Twenty-five Guineas per annum for Boys under Twelve. A Tutor will attend in the evening. Mrs. G. begs to refer to the following Gentlemen :- Rev. Dr. Haldane, Rev. Dr. Buist, Rev. Br. Ferrie, and Professor Alexander, St. Andrews; Rev. John Ker, Polmont; Rev. James M'Farlane, Muiravonside ; Rev. George Boag, Uphall; Rev. James Fowler, Ratho ; Rev. Charles Nairne, St. John's, Glasgow ; Dr. John M'Farlane, 114, St Vincent Street, Glasgow ; Professor Simpson, Dr. Thatcher, and Dr. Wm. Campbell, Edinburgh.

 

 

 

Caledonian Mercury: Stirling Observer; Thursday15th ; Morning Chronicle;  Morning Post, Friday 16th August 1844

FALKIRK TRYST.

SKYE, LEWIS, AND MORAY CATTLE, &c

A small lot of Lewis' cows were bought by Mr. A. Walker, Avonbridge, for L.3 16s.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 21st November 1844

EASTERN DISTRICT OF STIRLINGSHIRE AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION.

TURNIP COMPETITION.

The importance of this species of crop is so widely acknowledged, and of such increasing value, that the energetic committee of our flourishing Association have done well in offering a handsome premium for the best three acres of yellow turnips grown on the exhibitors farm within the district. The very competent judges, Messrs Hope, farmer, Carbrookmains, and Nielson, Gallowmoor, accordingly, at the close of last month, made their interesting tour over the fields of the eight competitors who came forward with the submission of their productive skill for decision; and we may safely defy any other locality in Scotland to be able to come up either to the efficiently competent farming that was evinced, or the abundance and quality of the stock produced. By the kindness of Mr. T. Girdwood the secretary, we are enabled to quote the words of the judges' decision : - "After inspecting the turnips pointed out by you on the different farms, in the first place, we must acknowledge that we were highly pleased to find so great a breadth of superior turnips in the district, and we have at last, after a hard task, come to the conclusion that Mr. Stark, farmer, Camelon, has the best, and Charles Stirling, Esq. of Muiravonside, the second. We may scarcely state that we remarked wherever guano had been applied, it has wrought a charm on the above crop."This, it will be observed, as applying over a wide extent of first-rate soil, and with all the appliances of splendid farming, is no mean praise. It would have been of no little importance, had we been able to afford a notice of the system pursued by the different competitors in the culture of their crops. Mr. Stirling took a very judicious and effective method of applying the guano. He had the field prepared in the usual way. Three cwt. of the article was then sown broad cast over the drills, which were then split with the plough. The seed was then put in. By this mode the guano was more generally mixed with the soil, and not so likely to injure the seed by its too great strength. At all events, three cwt. so applied to a single acre has resulted in a second prize, where all was of a high character. We may only add that on no former occasion have the labours of the Association been crowned with greater success; and we congratulate them on their continued solicitude for the cause of agriculture over our fertile carses and moorlands.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 3rd October 1844

FALKIRK.

The harvest is now nearly completed around Falkirk. In the carses and muirlands the crops are most abundant, and brought into the barn-yard in excellent condition. Seldom has such a harvest been recorded, and now we may look with confidence for low markets during the remainder of the season. The potato operations will be general next week, and they are of a very superior quality, and it is expected will be about 5s. per boll. Several cargoes of foreign wheat have been imported to Grangemouth of fine quality; but in consequence of the sliding scale, these bounties of God's providence are put under bond, perhaps to be devoured by vermin, while a storehouse is being erected for guano, several cargoes of which are expected to that port, and will be of great advantage to the carse farmers and gardeners in the locality so that while foreign produce is taxed, foreign manure will be free of duty. SLAMANNAN RAILWAY. –

On Saturday the 2lst ult., while the passenger train was returning from Causewayend to Airdrie, it went into an off-let opposite Mr. Gardner's sawmill, near Avonbridge, and came against a waggon filled with stones, with a tremendous crash, propelling the waggon a good distance from the lye, but luckily none the passengers were very severely hurt. One person perceiving the danger sprang from the coach, and fortunately escaped unhurt, which was rather miraculous, as the engine was going with great velocity. After the above occurred, all the passengers went away on their feet It was subsequently ascertained that the accident was owing to the man who took the waggon into the offlet having forgot to shut the switches.

1845

 

Stirling Observer 13th March 1845

EASTERN DISTRICT OF STIRLINGSHIRE AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION.

The Spring show of this industrious association took place on Thursday last, and was characterised by unwonted vigour and excellence on the part of the various competitors, and a corresponding degree of interest among the farmers and other strangers who were in town - - it being the March fair. The Corn-Market, which is excellently adapted for such occasions, except perhaps on the score of room, was during the exhibition crowded by a large assemblage, who expressed high satisfaction with the various produce brought forward, comprising as it did a greater amount of skilful intelligence and efficient success than has ever yet marked any previous show. The seed grain, as a principal article, was justly esteemed as peculiarly fitted for the northern and southern parts of the eastern district of Stirlingshire; and will no doubt tell in the crops raised. On no former occasion have such capital specimens of fat stock been shown. The Angus West Highlanders, and Ayrshire cattle, of which seven pairs were shown, were distinguished for the superior points that satisfy the judgment of dealers and brought, immediately after, high prices. Of the butter and cheese, for which the neighbourhood has always been famed, the whole was decidedly fine; and we heartily congratulate the patrons that their efforts have thus again been seconded by the united efforts of the committee, and the tangible exertions of the agriculturists all over one of the most favoured localities in Scotland. The following list comprises the result of the competition: -

GRAIN. For the best 4 qrs. of barley, grown in the southern part of the district lst, William Forbes, Esq. of Callendar; no competition.

For the best 4 qrs. of do., grown in the northern part of the district lst, Mr. Geo. Mitchell, Heuk; 2d, Mr. Reid, Haining Valley.

For the best 4 qrs. of oats, grown in the northern part of the district lst, Mr. Fulton, Sunnyside; 2d, Mr. George Mitchell.

For the best 4 qrs. long oats, grown in the southern part of the district - lst, William Forbes, Esq.

For the best 4 qrs. of do., grown in the northern part of the district lst, Mr. Fulton ; 2d, Mr. Thos. Stark, Camelon.

For the best 4 qrs. beans, grown in the district - lst, Sylvester D. Stirling, Esq. of Glenbervie; 2d, Mr. Johnstone, Beancross.

For the best 2 qrs. of perennial ryegrass seeds, grown in the southern part of the district - Wm. Forbes, Esq.

For the best 2 qrs. of do., grown in the northern part of the district - Mr. Alex. Taylor, Broomage Mains.

FAT CATTLE. For the two fattest cattle - lst, Mr. William Callander of Mungal Cottage ; 2d, Mr. Reid. For the fattest animal, exclusive of the above - Wm. Forbes, Esq.

CHEESE. For the best specimen of full milk cheese, made by the Exhibitor, within the district, in 1814, the quantity not being less than half-a-cwt. - Mr. Rennie, Craigie Burn. For the best specimen of skimmed milk, do. do. do. - Mr. Robert Arthur, Wester Pirly Hill.

SALT BUTTER. For the best lot of salt butter, made by the Exhibitor within the district - lst, Mr. Robert Arthur ; 2d, Mr. Stirling, Muiravonside ; 3d, Mr. John Stark, Wester Glen. The judges for the grain were Messrs Thomson, Inveravon ; Mitchell, Kinneil Carse; Brock, Overton. Those for the cattle being Messrs Gray, Edinburgh ; and Neilson and Thomson, Glasgow. The butter and cheese were judged by Messrs Kier and Hosie, grocers. At the close of the more immediate business of the day, a dinner took place in the Red Lion Inn, numerously attended by the friends of the association. The chair, in absence of Mr. Forbes of Callendar, the president, was well filled by Captain Forbes, his brother, supported right and left by S. D. Stirling, Esq. of Glenbervie, and Urquhart, Esq. of Vellore. The croupier was John Borthwick, Esq., factor to the right hon. the Earl of Zetland. The toasts were followed by many for the prosperity of the farmers, and the welfare of all classes who depend on the productions of the soil Malcolm did his duty as usual, and the dinner and wines were excellent.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 10th April 1845

PROPERTY AND INCOME TAX. COUNTIES OF STIRLING, CLACKMANNAN, AND LINLITHGOW. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, to PERSONS ASSESSED under the PROPERTY and INCOME TAX ACT, that as the COURTS appointed for hearing APPEALS against Assessments for the abovementioned Tax are now past for the year ending sth April, 1845; and as all parties interested got due Notice of the Meeting of said Courts, and consequently had an opportunity to appeal, if they felt so disposed, no further opportunity of appeal can now upon any account be allowed. And as the Assessment Books are in the hands of the Collector, strict injunctions have been given him to proceed in his collection, and levy the duties with all despatch ; and upon no pretence whatever to accept of a plea for delay from any person on the ground that an appeal is to be lodged against the Assessment, as none can now be received or attended to. For the greater convenience of the Public, the following Days and Places of Collection have been fixed on, when the Collector will attend personally to receive payment, viz.:

At Polmont, upon Tuesday the 29th current, within Walker's Inn for the Parishes of Polmont,

Muiravonside, and Slamannan.

 

Stirling Observer 5th June 1845

SCOTTISH NEWS.

Call On Tuesday, the 20th instant, the United Associate Congregation of Avonbridge, Stirlingshire, gave a unanimous call to Mr. W. Hownam, preacher of the gospel, to be their pastor. Mr. Hownam has also received a call from the congregation of Whitehaven.

 

Stirling Observer -Thursday 12th  June 1845

EASTERN DISTRICT OF STIRLINGSHIRE AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION.

Ever since the institution of our Association, conducted as it is, and situated in a locality that embraces at once the garden of the carses and the valuable farms of the moorlands, there has been every scope for a full working out of the views of scientific farmers. How successfully the members have availed themselves of its advantages - and they include every one of spirit and intelligence connected with the soil within a wide circuit - let our reports of the proceedings testify. Perhaps in no other district of Scotland can a greater amount of real solid benefit be pointed to, than that which characterises the improved condition of the farms in our locality, either as relates to the mode of culture, the superior breed of horses and cattle, or the high fame of the grain, which has justly rendered the stock market of Falkirk among the most important in the county. The feelings, besides, of generous rivalry among the classes more immediately interested, while they blend and amalgamate all in a common cause, will ever secure their own esteem, the encouragement of landlords, the blessings of the consumer, and the thanks of the public. The present show was for cattle, horses, swine, and butter; and to say that the breeds of cattle met the entire approbation of the judges, and rendered their duty one of no little difficulty, would be only the unvarnished fact; that the horses shown were the best of their kind, would be equally true; and that the pigs might have gained premiums at any English show, was pleasingly demonstrated. The butter also maintained its long-established celebrity. A commodious field on the Callendar estate was appropriated by William Forbes, Esq., M.P., the energetic President of the Association, for the show. The arrangements of the committee were complete, and the greatest order was maintained - the single attendance of Thomas Gentles, one of the most active of the county police, being sufficient. On the whole, we but express the general opinion, in declaring this show to have been one of the most creditable to all parties that has hitherto crowned the labours of the Association. The following list comprises the award of the judges: -

CATTLE.

For the best Bull of any age, under 5 years - 1st, Mr. Henry Reid, Haining valley; 2nd, Mr. Taylor, Broomage Mains.

For the best two year old Bull - John Borthwick, Esq. factor, Kerse.

For the best Cow, having a calf this season, or near calving- 1st, William Forbes. Esq. M.P.; 2d. Mr. Reid; 3rd, Mr. Dobbie. Seamores.

For the best 3 Cows out of one byre - 1st, Mr. Dobbie; 2nd, Mr. Reid.

For the best Cow bred in the district -1st, Mr. Coubourgh, Thorn; 2nd, Mr. Forbes; 3rd, Mr. Dobbie.

For the best two year-old Quey in milk, bred in the district - 1st, Mr. Reid; 2nd, Mr. Renny Craigburn.

For the best two year-old Quey in calf, or near calving - 1st, Mr. Robertson, Myrehead; 2nd, Mr. Callander, Mungal Cottage.

For the best two-year-old Quey not in calf 1st, Mr. Renny; 2nd, Mr. Dobbie; 3rd, Mr. Learmonth, Caermuirs.

For the best year-old Quey - 1st, Mr. Dobbie; 2nd, Mr. J. Stark, Wester Glen; 3d, Mr. Renny.

For the 3 best year-old Quey 1st, Mr. Stark ; 2nd. Mr. Renny; 3rd, Mr. Stark.

For the best yearling Bull - 1st, Mr. Reid; 2nd, Mr. Robertson; 3d, Mr. Arthur, Pirliehill.

For the best Bull Calf - 1st, Mr. Dobbie; 2nd. Mr. Neilson, Greenwells.

For the best Quey Calf - 1st, Mr. Reid; 2nd, Mr. Taylor.

HORSES.

For the best Brood Mare for Agricultural purposes, foaled, or to foal - 1st. Mr. Forbes; 2nd, Mr. Thomas Stark, Camelon; 3rd, Mr. Bowie, Gilmeadowland.

For the best Brood Mare, (not in milk) - 1st, Mr. Forbes; 2nd, Mr. Wilson. Nieolton; 3rd, Mr. Reid.

For the best three year-old Filly - 1st, Mr. T. Stark; 2nd, Mr. Forbes.

For the best two-year old Colt - 1st, Mr. Thos. Stark; 2nd, Mr. Waddel, Waulkmilton.

For the best two-year-old Filly - 1st, Mr. R. Mitchell, Redding; 2nd, do.

For the best yearling Colt - Mr Forbes.

SWINE.

For the best Boar, (in full condition, and having produced stock) - 1st, Mr. Forbes; 2nd, do.

For the best Brood Sow, (in pig, or having littered) 1st, Mr. Oswald, Gilston; 2nd, Mr. Forbes.

BUTTER.

For the best 3lbs of Fresh Butter, produced in the district, and made up in half pound rolls - 1st, Mr. Arthur; 2nd. Charles Stirling, Esq. Muiravonside; 3rd, Mr. Neilson; 4th, Mr. Coubrough.

SWEEPSTAKES.

For the best 5 home-bred Cows, either in calf or giving milk, open to all members - Mr. Dobbie.

For the best year-old Bull of the Ayrshire breed - Mr. Reid.

For the best fat Pig or Sow, under 22 months old - Mr. Dobbie.

The judges for stock were, Messrs JBaird, Highcross ; Anderson, Curtriod ; and Scott, Easter Calder.

For butter, Messrs Hankine, Keir, and Hosie.

After the more immediate affairs of the day had been gone through with so much satisfaction, the usual dinner took place in the Red Lion Inn. The chair was appropriately filled by Mr. Forbes - Charles Stirling, Esq. of Muiravonside, doing the duties of croupier. The Chairman intimated his continuance of his donation next show of £20. The croupier gives £5, and Mr. Henry Reid a similar sum.

 

 

 

 

Dundee, Perth, and Cupar Advertiser Tuesday 24th June 1845

This day is published, in 8vo, price 5s cloth, A VERSION of the PROPHECIES of EZEKIEL; retaining, for the most part, in English, the same order of Expression which occurs in the Hebrew Original. By the Reverend James M'Farlan, Minister at Muiravonside.

Oliver & Boyd, Edinburgh

 

Morning Post Wednesday 2nd July 1845

This day is published, in 8vo, price 5s cloth, A VERSION of the PROPHECIES of EZEKIEL; retaining, for the most part, in English, the same order of Expression which occurs in the Hebrew Original. By the Reverend James M'Farlan, Minister at Muiravonside.

Oliver & Boyd, Edinburgh

 

Stirling Observer  Thursday 31st July 1845

AVONBRIDGE SCHOOL.

Under this head it may possibly be recollected that an article appeared in our columns in April, 1844, referring to certain proceedings against Mr. Garvie, the teacher of this school. These proceedings having been successfully resisted by him, and latterly terminated in his favour in a court of law, we deem it proper to notice the issue now as important for the information of associations similarly organised, or having objects and interests in view akin to those of the Avonbridge School Society; and also, as instructing the propriety of tile remarks we then threw out for the consideration of the parties. The article referred to ran thus: - "A letter in this paper of the 28th ultimo, in reference to the treatment of a female teacher, in the parish of Larbert leads us to notice the almost parallel position of affairs as regards Avonbridge School. Some years ago a tack was granted of a piece of ground to four parties - Managers of Avonbridge School Society for behoof of themselves and the other Members of the said Society present and future, and to their assignees,' for the period Of 999 years after Whitsunday, 1537. Mr. William Bryce Garvie having been introduced as teacher of the school erected on the piece of ground so leased, has continued to discharge his duties with most exemplary assiduity and faithfulness, marked by eminent success among his pupils, whose proficiency is unquestioned. About two years ago, a small section of oppositionists to Mr. Garvie sprung up, and would, latterly, fain expel him from his office. Two or three of the tacksmen, and the great majority of the members and subscribers to the school, and of the parents and guardians of children attending thereat, and heads of families in the district, continue warmly attached to Mr. Garvie, and the attendance of pupils goes on increasingly prosperous. The oppositionists failing in an attempt to expel Mr Garvie at Whitsunday, 1843, introduced a rival teacher, to starve Mr. G. out, as was said; but Mr. Garvie's success not having been affected by this device, the rival shared the fate intended for Mr. G. The small knot of oppositionists and a precious, and partly a notorious, portion of the Church Residuary, recently laid their sage heads together to effect Mr. G.'s expulsion. He was asked to do what it was previously known he would not do, viz. subscribe, implicitly, the Westminster Confession of Faith. What greater crime could he be guilty of than refuse this so sectarian request! The knot, unknown to the lessees and bulk of members patronising the school, advertised for candidates for the office of teacher, to appear on the 25th ultimo. On that day the knot and a trio of the Church Residuary (Messrs Davidson of Slamannan, Macfarlane of Muiravonside, and Brancks of Torphichen,) with Mr. Cuthbertson, preacher at Avonbridge, met there to examine candidates, and elect a successor to Mr. Garvie In limine objections were stated to the title of the clergymen to appear or examine, and to the contemplated proceedings in toto. In vain was it urged the clergymen had no status there - that it was ultra vires in them to interfere - that the lessees being against the proceedings, rendered them null - that at all events the great bulk of the school supporters and members being against the proceedings, and determined to retain Mr. Garvie, the threatened proceedings should be quashed. The reverend gentlemen most reverently sagacious, said these objections were all irrelevant and of this the minister of Slamannan was certain! In vain was a protest taken. The knot proceeded making a minute of their own, representing their sentiments only, and excluding evervthing urged by several of the lessees, and by the members, or their mandatories, if favourable to Mr. G. Thus the latter, in defence held themselves as constituting the meeting, while the former proceeded, and it is supposed, went through the farce of electiting a teacher to terrify away Mr. G. Since then the knot has raised a process of removing, before the Sheriff, against Mr. G. at the instance - aye, at the instance of whom? - Of the tacksmen? No. Of the whole members, or a majority? No; but at the instance of six individuals, as "a majority of the committee of management," pretended to have been named. The other four are in favour of Mr. G., together with one of those named as pursuers, his name being so used unauthorisedly, and who accordingly disclaims the action. Another name, it is said, is likewise used without authority. Thus the pretended committee is equally divided at least, or rather, probably, six against the action, and four for it!! Even if otherwise, however, is such conduct correct? So late as November, 1842, the resident Dissenting clergyman (Mr. Craig) at Avonbridge, warmly applauded Mr. G. by a holograph testimonial - while prior to that date, and even since, the minister of Muiravonside was equally warm in his favour towards Mr. G. But as even the Avonbridge folks have their ideas of Church politics, and are more attached to Non-Intrusion than otherwise, and as some folks, even though changelings, like to show their zeal, it seems the Church in the district is thought to require all her nurseries - must guard all her outposts - thence it is said the school must belong to the Church! Is it possible so absurd an idea can be cherished? We know it has been said. We shall see. Now, Mr. Editor, through the columns of your paper, I hope the facts related may appear unobscured by that eye-film of intolerant, narrow sectarianism which doubtless dims and darkens the visual organs of parties, (who know, and ought to know better,) when in their own rural district, and if so, two wise purposes will be served - litigious fools will save their money from the cormorant maw of the knights of the quill, and Mr. Garvie be left in happy quiet to teach the young idea how to grow. The process of removing raised by the pretended committee or majority, it is right to state, was favourably disposed of for the pursuers in the Inferior Court; but the sentence having been brought under review in the Supreme Court, the result was otherwise, and it was, amongst other things, there found that the action was irregular and incompetent. Mr. Garvie has, moreover, obtained a decerniture for the expenses incurred by him in both the Supreme and the Inferior Court. The judgment, of which we have been favoured with a copy, containing these findings, is in these terms :- " 5th June, 1845. - The Lord Ordinary having heard parties' procurators, and considered the closed record, and whole proceedings : Finds that a school has existed for some years at the village of Avonbridge, and that the same has been supported by persons subscribing from time to time : Finds that on the 6th of Jan. 1838, a tack of a piece of ground was granted for the period of 999 years, at a tack duty of one penny sterling, yearly, on which ground the present schoolhouse and schoolmaster's house were built; and that the parties in whose favour the tack was so granted, were Robert Inglis, John Gilchrist, William Gardner, and Matthew Anderson, the present managers aforesaid of the said Avonbridge School Society, and to their successors in office, for behoof of themselves and the other members of the said society, present and future, and to their assignees: Finds it admitted that at a meeting of subscribers to the said school, held on the 29th of November, 1839, the suspender was chosen teacher of the school from that time until Whitsunday, 1840, and was subsequently elected for another year, viz. until Whitsunday, 1841, and that he was, in pursuance of this appointment, put in possession of the schoolhouse and schoolmaster's house : Finds that the present action was instituted in the name of' Alexander Main, farmer, Bogo. preses of the committee of management of the subscription school at Avonbridge; Alexander Walker, flesher, Paixhole; James Gardner, Wright, Avonbridge; John Walker, weaver at Shuttlefield, Pleasance; John Gilchrist, mason at Strathloanhead, and Robert Weir, labourer, Crumleyfield ; a majority of the said committee of management:' Finds that the respondent, John Wallace, ; has disclaimed the action, and that no appearance is made therein for any of the parties named in the foresaid tack, with the exception of John Gilchrist: Finds no evidence of the defender having been dismissed from his office of Schoolmaster at any regular meeting of the subscribers, and finds that no authority was given by the said subscribers to a majority of the committee of management, in which character alone the pursuers insist in this action to institute the same; and, therefore, finds that the pursuers have no title to insist in the said action, and decerns : Finds that the action is also irregular and incompetent, in respect it is laid down on the act of sederunt, 14th Dec. 1756, which is applicable to the removing of tenants alone, and that the defender not being in possession of the schoolhouse, or schoolmaster's house, in the character of tenant, or Sub-tenant, no action of removing could be directed against him under the foresaid act of sederunt: Therefore suspends the decree and charge complained of and whole grounds and warrants thereof; and declares the interdict perpetual and decerns: Finds the suspender entitled to expenses incurred by him both in this Court and the Inferior Court, of which allows an account to be given in, and remits tbe same to the auditor of court to tax and report. (Signed) P. Robertson For Suspender - George Deas, Esq. advocate; Wm. Waddell, Esq. W.S.; Adam Smith. Esq. writer, Falkirk ; agents. For Respondents - George Monro. Esq. advocate; Messrs T. & R. Landell, S.S.C.; Thomas Liston, Esq. writer, Falkirk; agents. Mr. Garvie's opponents, we understand, have acquiesced in the above judgment, which, we trust, will do much, when known, to modify that spirit of sectarianism out of which all the proceedings may be said to have arisen - a spirit too frequently exhibited, and so often, in its manifestations and practical consequences, going to destroy the peace and quiet of whole districts. In rural localities in particular, especially when fostered by spiritual pride, with a due admixture of personal spleen, occasioning the almost total absence of everything like charity or Christian toleration, it never fails to prove itself the bane of amity, of social concord, and of domestic or family happiness. In our searches or zeal for truth, it is, we humbly conceive, our duty to be meek and charitable towards those who conscientiously differ in doctrine or opinion from us, using the power of friendly persuasion, instead of grunting sectarian dogmas, sometimes not very clearly understood even by parties adopting and proclaiming them, at the hazard of thereby narrowing, instead cf extending, the Messiah's kingdom. Gravely - how can we think of grace, or expect it for ourselves, if, instead of being gracious, we become bigoted and oppressive? Should we give a stone to the hungry, or put a stumbling block before those who are in a wrong path? Let every man be firm in his own conviction, is, we think, an exhortation of St. Paul: and, if so, surely little can be more absurd, nay, sinful, than to be overbearing in our deportment or conduct towards brethren, who, in mutual intercourse, may not at once signify an opinion or perception, in matters either civil or spiritual, in all respects chiming in with our own. It is an excellent and appropriate advice, which is exposed by some beautiful lines of Dr. Watts, running, if our memory is correct, nearly in these terms:- " Pick up the truth where'er 'tis found, On heathen or on Christian ground; The flower's divine where'er it grows - Reject the prickle - seize the rose !" May these sentiments be cherished and acted upon by all, and their truth and value be recognised through even the dingy obscurity of legal subtlety, or the gloomy darkness of mental conception, occasioned by a lost plea. –

Communicated.

 

London Standard  Monday 6th October, Morning Chronicle Tuesday 7th October, 1845

PROSPECTUS of the SCOTTISH CENTRAL and CALEDONIAN JUNCTION' RAILWAY ensuring the nearest and most direct communication between England and the Midland and Northern Districts of Scotland.- Capital £250,000, in Shares of £20 each. Deposit £9 2s. per share.

PROVISIONAL COMMITTEE.

Sir James Campbell, Glasgow, director of the Scottish South Midland Junctionl Railway.

John Learmonth, Esq., of Dean, chairman of the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway.

Alexander Denniston, Esq. of Golhill, director of the Edinburgh and Bathgate Railway.

Major Maitland, of Freugh, director of the Scottish Southern Railway.

 John Fleminig, Esq., of Clairmount, Glasgow, director of the Glasgow, Kiltmarnock, and Ayr Railway. Alexander Drysdale, Esq., Glasgow, director of the Edinburgh and Glasgow, and Scottish South Midland Junction Railways.

Alexander M'Neill, Esq., advocate, director of the Edinburgh and Glasgow, and Stirling and Dunfermline Rallways.

Engineer-John Miller, Esq., F.R.S.E.

Acting Engineer-Alexr. J. Adie, Esq., C.E.

Bankers-

The Bank of Scotland, the Union Bank of Scotland, Edinburgh and Glasgow ; Messrs. Glyn and Co., London ; the Manchester and Liverpool District Bank, Liverpool.

Solicitors-Messrs. Deans Dunlop, and Hope, Fludyer-Street, Westminster;Messrs. A. and A. Macgeorge, 21, St. Vincent-place,  Glasgow.

This short but very important line will start from a point on the Edinburgh Branch of the Caledonian Railway, near the Cobinshaw reservoir, and passing through or near to West Calder, Bathgate, Torphichan, Muiravonside, &c, will join the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway between Polmont and Lilnithgow, at the point where the Slamannan Railway joins the Edinburgh and Glasgow. A direct communication will thus be formed with the Scottish Central and other northern railways, which, by the existing or projected lines could only be reached from the south by a very circuitous route. The proposed line will pass through a populous district, abounding in minerals. It will cross, and, if necessary, form junctions in its progress with, the projected Edinburgh and Bathgate, the Airdrie and Bathgate, and the Lanarkshire and Lothian Railways. A peculiar feature of this line Is, that it interferes with no other scheme. Many lines have seen projected running east and west, but there is none which crosses this important district of country, or provides so direct a communication with the north. This is a feature of great importance in the scheme, independent of the connection which it will establish between the great trunk line from the south, and the Scottish Central and other northern railways. It will likewise provide what is so greatly needed, a direct communication from West Calder and Bathgate, and that district of country, to different points on the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway. The line has been already surveyed. The length will he less than 12 miles. The gradients are very easy, and the country presents no engineering difficulties.

Applications for shares may he made to Messrs. J. R. Dennistoun and James Jardine, Renfield-street;, John Macgeorge, 32, Exchange- square; and James Brown, 112, Exchange-square, Glasgow ; Thomas Miller,Edinburgh; George Irvine, Liverpool; and J. A. Gloag, Perth

 

Stirling Observer  Thursday 23rd & 30th October, 6th November 1845

THE STIRLINGSHIRE MIDLAND JUNCTION RAILWAY.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,

THAT application is intended to be made to Parliament in next Session, for leave to bring in a Bill or Bills for making and maintaining a Railway or Railways, and all proper Works and Conveniences connected therewith, from the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway, at or near the Polmont Station of the said Railway, in the parish of Polmont, or at or near Causewayend, in the parish of Muiravonside, to, and to communicate with, the Scottish Central Railway, at a point in the parish of Larbert or the parish of Falkirk, near to the Village of Larbert; with a Branch Railway from the Main Line to Carron Iron Works; and another Branch Railway from the Main Line to Falkirk Iron Works; which Railway and Branch Railways, and the works to be connected therewith, will be situate in, or will pass from, through, or into, the several parishes of Polmont, Falkirk, Larbert and Muiravonside, or some of them, in the County of Stirling. And Notice is also Given, that Plans and Sections, describing the Lines and Levels of the said intended Works, and the Lands and Property which may be required to be taken for the purposes thereof, together with Books of Reference to such Plans, containing the Names of the Owners or reputed Owners, Lessees or reputed Lessees and Occupiers of such Lands and Property, will, on or before the 30th day of November next, be deposited for public inspection in the offices in Stirling and Falkirk respectively, of the principal Sheriff-Clerk of the County of Stirling; and that a copy of as much of the said Plans, Sections, and Books of reference, respectively, as relates to each of the parishes before specified, will, on or before the 31st day of December next, be deposited for public inspection with the Schoolmaster, or if there be no Schoolmaster, with the Session-Clerk of each of such parishes, respectively, at the place of abode of such Schoolmaster or Session-Clerk. And Notice is further Given, that it is intended to take power to deviate, in the construction of the said Railways and Works, from the Lines delineated on the said plans intended to be deposited as aforesaid, to such an extent as will he defined on the plans; and also, to alter and divert such Highways, Turnpike or other Roads, Railways, Streets, Paths, Passages, Rivers, Canals, Brooks, Streams, Sewers, Waters and Watercourses, as it may be necessary or expedient to alter or divert, for the purpose of making and maintaining, or more conveniently making and maintaining or using the said Railways or any of the Works connected therewith. And Notice is Also Given, that it is intended to Incorporate a Company for the purpose of making, maintaining, working, and using the said Railways and the Works connected therewith, and for other purposes in relation thereto, with powers to such Company for the compulsory purchase of Lands, Houses, and other Property ; and it is intended to vary or extinguish all existing rights and privileges connected with the Lands, Houses, and Property so to be purchased, or which would in any manner impede or interfere with the construction, maintenance, or use of the said Railways and Works, and to confer other rights and privileges: As also, with powers to the Company to be so Incorporated, to levy Tolls, Rates, and Duties on, and for the use of, the said Railways and Works, and for the Conveyance of Passengers and Goods; and it is intended to confer certain exemptions from payment of such Tolls, Rates, and Duties, and certain other rights and privileges in relation thereto: As also, with powers to the said Company to enter into and carry into execution with any Companies or Corporations, or any Commissioners, Road-Trustees, or other Bodies or Persons, such Arrangements and Agreements as may be expedient or proper, for the making or maintaining the said intended Railways and Works, and for the use of the same; as also with power to the said Company to make and carry into effect, arrangements for Leasing or Selling the said Railways and Works, or any portion thereof, to any other Company or Corporation, upon such terms as may be mutually agreed upon.

RUSSEL & AITKEN, Falkirk. ARCHIBALD GRAHAME MONCRETFF & WEEMS, 30, Great George Street, Westminster.

Dated the 18th day of October, 1845.

STIRLINGSHIRE MIDLAND JUNCTION RAILWAY.

THE LISTS have now been Closed, as previously announced, but in consequence of the immense number of applications, the Letters of Allocation cannot be issued for a few days.

A. SMITH JAFFRAY, Interim Secy.

 

Morning Chronicle Friday 7th November 1845

EDINBURGH AND GLASGOW.-

(From our Correspondent.)-The shareholders of this line are, we learn, shortly to meet for the purpose of considering and deciding upon the prosecution of the following measures :-

1st. The several lines and branches mentioned In the notices now given by the company in terms of the standing orders of Parliament, and of which a copy is herewith published.

2d. A branch from Avon-bridge to Borrowstouness, for which notices have also been given by this company.

3d. An amalgamation between this company and the three Monkland Mineral Railways, viz., the Monkland and Kirkintilloch, the Balochney, and the Slamannan Railways,and also an agreement entered into by the directors with them under the powers conferred on this company by their present acts.

4th. An amalgamation between this company and the Scottish Central, and also an agreement entered into by the directors with said company, under the powers conferred on this company by their present acts.

5th. An amalgamation between this company and the Wishaw and Coltness; and also an agreement entered into by the directors with said company, under the powers conferred on this company by their present acts.

6th. Agreements entered into, or about to be entered into, by the directers of this company to lease and work the following projected lines, to execute which parliamentary powers are to be applied for next session, viz. --The Stirling,Dunfermline and Queensferry; the Edinburgh and Glasgow, and Dumbartonshire Junction; the Edinburgh and Bathgate; the Kirkintilloch and Kilsyth; and theStirlingshire Direct Midland Junction Railways.

7th. An agreement with the Glasgow, Paisley, Kilmarnock, and Ayr Company, as to the promoting a bill for the proposed West of Scotland Junction Railway, intended to connect this company's line and the other lines on the north of the river Clyde, with the lines situated on the south thereof; and also for the parpose of giving the directors full powers to carry such of these measures as shall then be approved of.

 

Glasgow Herald Friday 7th November 1845

Advertisements & Notices

AVON WATER MIINERAL JUNCTION RAILWAY.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That application is intended to be made in the ensuing Session of Parliament for leave to bring in a Bill or Bills for making and maintaining a Railway or Railways, with all proper Works and Conveniences therewith connected, to be called the "AVON-WATER MINERAL JUNCTION RAILWAY ;" which Railway is to commence at a point on the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway at or near to the Castlecary Station of the said railway, in the parish of Falkirk and. County of Stirling, or in the Parish of Cumbernauld and County of Dumbarton,and to terminate at a point on another intended Line of Railway, called the "Scottish Central -and Caledonian Junction Railway," upon, at, or near to the Lands of Bridgehouse, in the Parish of Torphichen and County of Linlithgow; together also with a Branch Railway from the said intended Main Line of Railway, to diverge therefrom at or near to the Lands of Threaprig, or Jawcraig, in the Parish of Falkirk and County of Stirling aforesaid, and to terminate at a point on, or near to the Lands of Blackbraes, in the Parish of Muiravonside and County of Stirling aforesaid; which intended Railway, and Branch Railway, and Works therewith connected, will be situate in or will pass from, through, or into the several parishes and places, following, or some of them, respectively, viz., The Parishes of Falkirk, Slamannan, Muiravonside, and Polmont in the County of Stirling, the Parish of Cumbernauld in the County of Dumbarton, and the Parish of Torphichen, in the County of Linlithgow: And it intended, by the said Bill or Bills, to take powers for altering and diverting such Highways, Turnpike and other Roads, Railways, Streets, Paths, Passages, Rivers, Canals, Brooks, Streams, Sewers, Waters, and Watercourses, as it may be necessary or expedient to alter or divert, for the purpos of making and maintaining, or more conveniently making and maintaining, and using the said Railway or Railways, Extensions, Branches and Works, and Conveniences connected thererwith: And it is also intended to take powers, in the said Bill or Bills to deviate in constructing, the said intended Railway or Railways, Extensions and Branches, from the Line or Lines laid down in the Maps or Plans thereof, to be deposited, as aftermentioned, to each extent as is, or shall he defined on the said Plans: And it is also intended by the said Bill or Bills, to incorporate a Company for making. maintaining working and using the said Railway, and Branch Railway, and Works, and for Conveying Passengers, Goods and Minerals thereon, and on other communicating Railways, and for other purposes; with powers for the compulsory purchase of Lands, Houses, -and other and Heritages, for the purposes thereof: And it is farther intended for to take powers to vary or extinguish all existing rights and privileges connected with the Lands, Houses, and other Heritages so to be purchased, and to confer other rights and privileges in relation thereto: And also with power to the said intended Company to levy Tolls, Rates and Duties, on and for the use of the said intended Railways and Works, and for the conveyance of Passengers and Goods as ,aforesaid: and to confer certain exemptions from payment of such Tolls, Rates and Duties, and certain other rights and privileges in relation thereto ; and also with power to the said intended Railway Company to enter into, and carry into execution, with any other Companies or Corporations, or any Commissioners, Road-Trustees, or other Bodies or Persons, such Arrangements and Agreement as may be expedient or proper, for the making and maintaining of the said intended Railways and any Works, or for the use, or for the working the same, or any portion thereof, or for amalgamating and incorporating the said intended Railways and Works, or any portion thereof, with such other Companies, Corporations, and others, as may he considered expedient: And it is further intended, by the said Bill or Bills, to enable the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway Company, or the Scottish Central Railway Company, or either of them, to Purchase, Rent, or take on Lease, the said intended Railways and Works, and to enable the Company so to be incorporated to Sell, Let or, Lease the same. AND NOTICE IS ALSO HEREBY GIVEN, That Duplicate Maps or Plans and Sections, describing the Lines, or Situations, and Levels of the said intended Railways, and other Works, and the Lands, Houses, and ether Heritages which may be taken for the puropses thereof, together with the Books of Reference to such Plans, containing the names of the Owners or Reputed Owners, Lessees or Reputed Lessees, and Occupiers of such Lands, Houses, and other Heritages. respectively, will be deposited for public inspection, on or before the thirtieth day of November next, in the Office in Stirling of the principal Sheriff- Clerk Of the County of Stirling as also at the Office of the Sheriff- Clerk of the  said County of Stirling, at Falkirk; in Dumbarton, in the Office of the principal Sheriff-Clerk of the County of Dumbarton ; and in Linlithgow, in the Office of the principal Sheriff-Clerk of the County of Linlithgow: And that a Copy of so much of the said Plans, Sections, and Books of Reference, respectively, as relate to each of the said Parishes before  mentioned, will on or before the thirtv-first day of December next, be deposited with the Schoolmaster, if any, and if there be no Schoolmaster, with the Session-Clerk of each such Parish, at the usual place of abode of such Schoolmaster or Session-Clerk.

 W. JOHNSTON, Bathgate.

DEANS, DUNLOP & HOPE, Fludyer Street, Westminster.

Bathgate, 16th October, 1845.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 13th   November 1845

TEACHER WANTED.

WANTED, for the Subscription School at Avonbridge, in the Parish of Muiravonside, a TEACHER qualified to teach the usual Branches in a Country School. The number of Pupils attending average from 60 to 100. A School and Schoolhouse are provided to the Teacher gratuitously. Applications to be lodged with Mr. Allan Bryce of Blackston ; or Mr. Matthew Anderson at Lintmill, Avonbndge, on or before the 20th current.

Avonbridge, 8th November, 1845.

 

Fife Herald Thursday 13th Thursday 20th Thursday 27th November, Stirling Observer Thursday 13th Thursday 20th Thursday 27th November 1845

EDINBURGH & GLASGOW RAILWAY.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,

THAT it is intended to apply to Parliament, in the ensuing Session, for an Act or Acts to Alter and Amend, Extend, or Enlarge the Powers and Provisions of the several Acts relating to the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway, passed respectively in the First and Second, the Third and Fourth, the Fifth, the Seventh and Eighth, and the Eighth and Ninth Years of the Reign of Her present Majesty, together with an Act relating to the Slamannan Junction Railway, passed in the Seventh and Eighth Years of the Reign of Her present Majesty ; and an Act relating to the Glasgow Junction Railway, passed in the Eighth and Ninth Years of the Reign of Her present Majesty, - which two said last mentioned Railways respectively now belong to the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway Company, - by which intended Act or Acts it is proposed to enable the Edinburgh & : Glasgow Railway Company to Make and Maintain the following Railways, or some of them, or some part or parts thereof, with all proper Works and Conveniences connected therewith, viz. First, - A Railway diverging from and out of the Edinburgh &. Glasgow Railway, at or near to Broomhouse,in the Parish of Corstorphine, in the County of Edinburgh, and terminating at or near to South Queensferry, in the Parish of Queensferry, and to Newhalls, in the Parish of Dalmeny, or one of them, both in the County of Linlithgow, and passing from, through, or into the Parishes, Townships, Burghs, or Places of Corstorphine, Ratho, Currie, Kirkliston, and Cramond, in the County of Edinburgh, and of Kirkliston, Dalmeny, Queensferry, and South Queensferry, in the County of Linlithgow. Second, - A Railway diverging from and out of the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway, by two forks, at or near to where the said Railway crosses the River Avon in the Parish of Muiravonside, in the County of Stirling, and terminating at or near to Kersie-Neuk in the Parish of Airth, in the County of Stirling, and passing from, through, or into the Parishes, Townships, Burghs, or Places of Muiravonside, Polmont, Falkirk, Bothkannar, Larbert, Airth, and St Ninian's, in the County of Stirling and Borrowstouness, in the County of Linlithgow, or some of them. Third, - A Branch Railway diverging from and out of the intended Railway last above described, at or near to Chapelton, in the Parish of Borrowstouness, in the County of Linlithgow, and passing from and through and terminating in the same Parish and County, at or near to the Town and Harbour of Borrowstouness. Fourth, - A Branch Railway diverging from and out of the intended Railway secondly above described, at or near to Kerse Mains, in the Parish of Falkirk, in the County of Stirling, and terminating at or near the Town and

Harbour of Grangemouth, in the Parishes of Falkirk, Bothkennar, and Polmont, in the County of Stirling, or one of them, and passing from, through, or into the Parishes, Townships, Burghs, and Places of Falkirk, Bothkennar, and Polmont, in the County of Stirling, or some or one of them. Fifth, - A Branch Railway diverging from and out of the intended Railway secondly above described at or near to Bell's Dyke, in the Parish of Airth, in the County of Stirling, and passing from and through, and terminating in the same Parish and County, at or near to Higginsneuk. Sixth, - A Railway diverging from and out of the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway, at or near to where the said Railway crosses the Edinburgh & Glasgow Union Canal, in the Parish of Falkirk, in the County of Stirling, and passing from and through and terminating in the same; Parish and County, by a Junction with the intended Railway secondly above described, at or near to Kerse Mains. Seventh, - A Railway diverging from and out of the intended Railway secondly above described at or near to Powbridge, in the Parish of Airth, in the County of Stirling, and terminating by a Junction with the Line of the Scottish Central Railway at or near Skeock, in the Parish of St Ninian's, in the County of Stirling, and passing from, through, or into the Parishes, Townships, Burghs, or Places of Airth and St Ninian's in the County of Stirling, or one of them. Eighth, - A Railway diverging from and out of the Slamannan Junction Railway, at or near to where the same crosses the Edinburgh & Glasgow Union Canal, in the Parish of Muiravonside, in the County of Stirling, and terminating at or near to Gardrum in the Parish of Falkirk, in the said County, and passing from, through, or into the Parishes, Townships, Burghs, or Places of Muiravonside and Falkirk, in the County of Stirling, or one of them. Ninth, - A Railway diverging from and out of the Edinburgh Sc Glasgow Railway at or near to Seabegs in the Parishes of Falkirk, in the County of Stirling, and terminating at or near to the Town of Denny, in the Parish of Denny, in the County of Stirling, and passing from, through, or into the Parishes, Townships, Burghs, or Places of Falkirk, Dunipace, and Denny, in the County of Stirling, or some of them. Tenth, - A Railway diverging from and out of the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway, at or near to the Croy Station thereof, in the Parishes of Cumbernauld and Kirkintilloch, in the County of Dumbarton, or one of them, and terminating by a Junction with the Monkland & Kirkintilloch Railway, at or near to Garnqueen Loch, in the Parishes of New Monkland and Cadder, in the County of Lanark, or one of them, and passing from, through, or into the Parishes, Townships, Burghs, or Places of Cumbernauld and Kirkintilloch, in the County of Dumbarton, and of New Monkland and Cadder, in the County of Lanark, or some of them. Eleventh, - A Railway diverging from and out of the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway at or near to Springvale, in the Parish of Glasgow or Inner High Church Parish of Glasgow, in the County of Lanark, and terminating at or near to the Village of Callander, in the Parish of Callander, in the County of Perth, and passing from, through, or into the Parishes, Townships, Burghs, or Places of Glasgow, Inner High Church of Glasgow, Barony of Glasgow, and Cadder, in the County of Lanark, of East or New Kilpatrick, in the Counties of Dumbarton and Stirling, of Baldcrnock, Strathblane, Killearn, Balfron, and Drymen, in the County of Stirling, and of Aberfoil, Port-of-Monteith, Kincardine, Kilmadock, and Callander, in the County of Perth, or some of them. Twelfth, - A Branch Railway diverging from and out of the intended Railway last above described at or near to Duntreath Castle, or alternatively at or near to the Village of Strathblane, both in the Parish of Strathblane, in the County of Stirling, and terminating by a Junction with the Line of the Branch to Lennoxtown of Campsie of the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway at or near to its proposed termination in the Parish of Campsie, in the County of Stirling, and passing from, through, or into the Parishes, Townships, Burghs, or Places of Strathblane and Campsie, in the County of Stirling. Thirteenth, - A Branch Railway diverging from and out of the intended Railway eleventhly above described, at or near to Spittal Ballat, in the Parish of Drymen, in the County of Stirling, and terminating at or near to the Village of Balfron, in the Parish of Balfron, in the County of Stirling, and passing from, through, or into the said Parishes of Drymen and Balfion, both in the County of Stirling. Fourteenth,  - A Railway diverging from and out of the Branch Line of the Glasgow Junction Railway, called the Branch to the Cut of Junction Canal, at or near to Gourlay's Distillery, in the Barony Parish of Glasgow, in the County of Lanark, and passing from and through and terminating in the same Parish and County, upon the Quay of Port-Dundas Basin, at or near to the Glasgow Distillery. Fifteenth, - A Railway diverging from and out of the Line of the Glasgow Junction Railway, at or near to where Regent-Street intersects Wellington-Street of Blythswood, in the Barony Parish of Glasgow, in the County of Lanark, and passing from and through, and terminating in the same Parish and County, at or near to Blythswoodholm. Sixteenth, - A Railway diverging from and out of the Line of the Glasgow Junction Railway, at or near to where the same is authorised to cross Main-Street of Anderston in the Barony Parish of Glasgow, in the County of Lanark, and terminating at or near to the Slip Dock near Kelvinhaugh, in the said Parish and County, and passing from, through, or into the Parishes, Townships, Burghs, or Places of Glasgow, Barony of Glasgow, and Anderston, or some of them, all in the County ofLanark Seventeenth, - A Railway diverging from and out of tha Line of the Glasgow Junction Railway, at or near to Napier's Dock in the Barony Parish of Glasgow, in the County of Lanark, and terminating at or near to the Slip Dock near Kelvinhaugh in the said Parish and County, and passing from, through, or into the Parishes, Townships, Burghs, or Places of Glasgow, Barony of Glasgow, and Anthrston, in the County of Lanark, or some of them. Eighteenth, - A Railway diverging from and out of the Line of the Glasgow Junction Railway, at or near to its termination at Hyde Park-Street, in the Barony Parish of , Glasgow, in the County of Lanark, and terminating at or near to the North end of Glasgow Bridge, in the Parish of St. George's of Glasgow, in the County of Lanark, and passing from, through, or into the Parishes, Townships, Burghs, or Places of Glasgow, Barony of Glasgow, St. George's of Glasgow, and Anderston, or some of them, all in the County of Lanark : And it is intended by the said Act or Acts to authorise the alteration of so much of the Line of the said Glasgow Junction Railway as lies between Regent-Street and Douglas-Street of Blythswood, in the City of Glasgow, and the abandonment of the said Line as at present authorised to be made between the said Streets, and the formation, by the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway Company, of a New Line of Railway in lieu thereof, from, or from near the North termination of Wellington Street of Glasgow, in the Barony Parish of Glasgow, in the County of Lanark, through and terminating within the said Parish by a Junction with the Line of the said Glasgow Junction Railway, at or near to Douglas-Street of Blythswood. And Notice is hereby Given, That it is proposed by the said Act or Acts to enable the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway Company to purchase and take, or to lease and to maintain and work the Ferry over the River Forth between Kersie Neuk, in the Parish of Airth, in the County of Stirling,and the Town of Alloa, in the Parish of Alloa, in the County of Clackmannan, and the Ferry over the River Forth, between Higgin's-Neuck, in the Parish of Airthin the County of Stirling, and the Town of Kincardine, in the Parish of Tulliallan, in the County of Perth, or one of them, and also to purchase and take, or to lease the harbour of Borrowstouness, and the Tolls, Rates, and Duties leviable by the Trustees of such Harbour, or some part or parts thereof, or to purchase or procure an exemption from such Tolls, Rates or Duties, and to enter into such other ' agreements with the said Trustees for facilitating the  improvement of the said Harbour, or its use for the purposes of the said Railways and Works as shall be mutually approved of, and to enable the said Trustees to make and complete such Sale, Lease, or Agreement; and with that. object to alter and amend, extend or enlarge, and in part repeal the powers and provisions of an Act relating to the said Harbour passed in the Seventh Year of the Reign of Her present Majesty, and to alter the Tolls, Rates, and Duties thereby authorised to be levied. And Notice is hereby further Given, That Plans and Sections describing the Line or situation and levels of the said intended Railways, and also describing the Lands to be taken and used for the purposes aforesaid, together withBooks of Reference to such Plans containing the Names ofthe Owners, or reputed Owners, Lessees, or reputed Lessees, and Occupiers of such Lands, will be deposited on or before the Thirtieth day of November, in the present Year, in the Office of the principal Sheriff-Clerk of the County of Edinburgh, at Edinburgh ; in the Office of the principal Sheriff-Clerk of the County of Linlithgow, at Linlithgow ; in the Offices of the principal Sheriff-Clerk of the County of Stirling, at Stirling and also at Falkirk ; in the Office of the principal Sheriff-Clerk of the County of Clackmannan, at Alloa ; in the Offices of the principal Sheriff-Clerk of the County of Perth, at Perth and also at Dunblane; in the Office of the principal Sheriff-Clerk of the County of Dumbarton, at Dumbarton; and in the Office of the principal Sheriff-Clerk of the County of Lanark, at Glasgow ; and that a Copy of so much of the said Plans, Sections, and Books of Reference, as relates to each Parish and Royal Burgh, in or through which the said Railways are intended to be made or altered, will be deposited on or before the Thirty-first day of December next, with the Schoolmaster, or, if there be no Schoolmaster, then with the Session-Clark i of each such Parish, at their respective Dwelling-places, and with the Clerks to the Royal Burghs of South Queensferry, Stirling, and Glasgow, at their Offices in South Queensferry, Stirling, and Glasgow, respectively. And Notice is hereby further Given, That it is proposed by the said Act or Acts to enable the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway Company to acquire compulsorily Lands and Houses for the purposes aforesaid, and to levy Tolls, Rates, and Duties, on and for the use of the said Railways, Ferries, and Works, and to alter the existing Tolls, Rates, and Duties, authorised to be levied by the'said recited Acts, or any of them, and to confer, vary, or take away exemptions from the payment of such Tolls, Rates and Duties, and to Ivary, alter, or extinguish all existing rights and privileges which would in any manner interfere with the objects aforesaid,and to confer other rights and privileges; and power is also proposed to be taken by the said Act or Acts to divert,alter, or stop up temporarily or permanently, withinthe Parishes, Townships, Burghs, or places aforesaid, all Turnpike and other Roads, Streets, Railways, Tramways, Canals, Rivers, Streams, and Water-Courses, which it may be necessary to interfere with in the construction or alterationof the said intended Railways, Ferries, and Works. And Notice is hereby further Given, That it is proposed by the said Act or Acts to take power to divert and alter, and permanently to shut up and appropriate the sites of certain Streets or Lanes, or intended Streets or Lanes situated within the Parishes of Barony of Glasgow, Saint George's of Glasgow, and Saint David's of Glasgow, which will be shown upon the said Plans, as intended to be so diverted, altered, or shut up and appropriated. And Notice is hereby Given, That it is intended by the said Act or Acts to exempt the Traffic passing along the said intended Railways or any of them, or any part or parts thereof, from all Customs or Duties leviable, or claimed to be leviable, by the Magistrates of the Burgh of Linlithgow in respect of Animals or Goods entering or passing through the said Burgh, or passing over the River Avon, under and by virtue of certain acts relating to such Customs or Duties, and to the said Burgh, passed by the Parliament of Scotland in the Reigns of His Majesty James the Sixth, of His Majesty Charles the Second, and of His Majesty James the Seventh of Scotland, or under and by virtue of certain Charters and Deeds following thereon, and also to exempt the said Traffic from all other Customs or Duties leviable or claimed to be leviable by any other Corporation or person in respect of Animals or Goods entering into or passing through any Town, or over any River, on the Line of the said intended Railways, and with the above objects, or otherwise to alter, fix, or limit such Customs or Duties, and to vary, extend, or repeal the powers and provisions of the Acts relating to the Burgh of Linlithgow, and the Customs and Duties leviable there, herein before recited. And Notice is hereby further Given, That it is proposed by the said Act or Acts to unite and amalgamate or incorporate with the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway Company, the following Railway Companies, or some of them, viz. The Scottish Central Railway Company; The Monkland & Kirkintilloch Railway Company ; the Ballochney Railway Company; and the Slamannan Railway Company; or alternatively to take power to the said last mentioned Companies, or some of them, to unite and amalgamate or incorporate with the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway Company, or to Sell or Lease to such Company their respective Undertakings, and to enable the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway Company to unite and amalgamate or incorporate ': with the said Companies, or some of them, or accept it Sale or Lease of the said respective undertakings, or some of them, and to empower the said respective Railway Companies, or some of them, and the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway Company, to enter into agreements with each other, fixing the terms upon which such Amalgamation, Sale, or Lease shall take place, and upon which the Traffic on the said Railways shall be conducted, and for the above purposes to alter and amend, extend or enlarge, and in part repeal the powers and provisions of the several Acts hereinafter recited, and to alter the Tolls, Rates, and Duties thereby authorised to be levied, and to confer, vary, or extinguish exemptions from payment of such Tolls, Rates, and Duties and other rights and privileges, viz. the Acts relating to the Scottish Central Railway passed in the Eighth and Ninth Years of Her present Majesty - the Acts relating to the said Monkland & Kirkintilloch Railway, passed respectively in the Fifth Year of the Reign of His late Majesty George the Fourth, in the Third and Fourth Years of the Reign of His late Majesty William the Fourth, and in the Second and Third, Sixth and Seventh, and Eighth and Ninth Years of the Reign of Her present Majesty - the Acts relating to the said Ballochney Railway, passed in the Seventh Year of the Reign of His late Majesty George the Fourth, the Fifth and Sixth Years of the Reign of His late Majesty William the Fourth, and the Second and Third and the Sixth and Seventh Years of the Reign of Her present Majesty - the Acts relating to the said Slamannan Railway, passed in the Fifth and Sixth Years of the Reign of His late Majesty William the Fourth, and in the First, and the Second and Third Years of the Reign of Her present Majesty;  - and an Act entitled "An Act to alter, amend, enlarge, and in part repeal the Acts relating to the Wishaw & Coltness Railway," passed in the Seventh and Eighth Years of the Reign of Her present Majesty, so far as such Act relates to the Monkland & Kirkintilloch Railway.

BANNATYNES & KIRKWOOD, Glasgow.

W. O. & W. HUNT, 10 Whitehall, Westminster.

Glasgow, 17th Oct. 1845.

 

Caledonian Mercury Thursday 13th November 1845

SCOTTISH CENTRAL AND CALEDONIAN JUNCTION RAILWAY.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that application is intended to be made to Parliament in the ensuing Session, for leave to bring in a BILL or BILLS for making and maintaining a RAILWAY or RAILWAYS, or some part or parts thereof, and all proper Works and Conveniences in connection therewith, leading from a point on the proposed Edinburgh Branch of the Caledonian Railway, at or near the sluice-house of or on the Cobinshaw reservoir, partly in the Parish of Carnwath, in the County of Lanark, and partly in the Parish of West Calder, in the County of Edinburgh, or in one or other of these Parishes, or from a point on the said Branch of the Caledonian Railway at or near to Torphin, in the said Parish of West Colder and County of Edinburgh, and to proceed through or near to West Calder, Bathgate, Torphichen, Muiravonside, and other places, and to terminate, by a Junction, with the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway, at a point between Polmont and Linlithgow, in the Parish of Linlithgow, at or near the place where the Branch of the Slamannan Railway joins on is intended to join, the said Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway; or to join the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway at a point near the Farm or Lands of Muirhead, in the Parish of Muiravonsid in the County of Stirling; together with a Branch from the said intended Main Line of Railway, from a point at or near to the Town of Bathgate, in the Parish of Bathgate, to, the Town or Village of Whitburn, in the Parish of Whitburn and County of Linlithgow, and with a Branch from the said intended Railway, to or near to the Village of Blackburn, in the Parish of Livingston, or in the Parish of Whitburn, or in both or either of these Parishes, in the County of Linlithgow, and to terminate at or near to Whitburn, aforesaid, or to terminate by a Junction with the proposed Edinburgh and Hamilton Direct Railway, at or near to Whitburn aforesaid, with all proper Works and Conveniences connected therewith, as the same will be shown on the Plans to be deposited as aftermentioned. Which Railway or Railways, Branch Railway, and other Works, will be situate in, or will pass from, through, or into the several Parishes and Places following, or some of them, viz., the Parish of Carnwath, in the County of Lanark, the Parish of West Calder and the Town or Village of West Calder, in the County of Edinburgh; the Parish of Livingstone; the Parish of Whitburn the Town or Burgh of Bathgate; the Parish of Bathgate; and the Parish of Torphichen, all in the County of Linlithgow and the Parish of Muiravonside, and the Parish of Polmont, in the County of Stirling. And for the purpose aforesaid, it is intended to incorporate a Joint Stock Company, for making, maintaining, working, and using the said Railway or Railways, Branch or Branches, and Works; and, for convening Passengers and Goods on the said Railway or Railways, Branch or Branches, and on other communicating Railways and for other purposes; with powers to take and acquire, by compulsory purchase, or otherwise, such Lands, Houses, and other Heritages, as may be necessary; also with powers to deviate in the construction of the said Railway or Railways, Branch, and Works, from the Lines delineated on the said Plans to such extent as will be defined on the said Plans; also with powers to alter, vary, and divert the Lines, Levels, and Inclinations of Tarnpike Roads, Highways, Roads, Streets, Tram Roads, Railways, Paths, Passages, or other Roads, Rivers, Canals, Brooks, Reservoirs, Water, Water Courses, Mill and other Ponds, where requisite for construction of the said Railway, Branch, and other Works; asd with power to levy Tolls, Rates, and Duties for the use of the said Railway and Branches, and the Engines, Warehouses, Depots, Stations, Landing Places, with any Conveniences connected therewith, and for the passage and carriage of Passengers, Merchandise, Articles, and Things, upon or along the same; and also for raising Money for the purposes of the said undertaking by the creation of Shares, or some other mode to be authorised by the said Act. And it is intended to vary, alter, or extinguish all existing rights or privileges and exemptions in any way connected with site Lands, Houses, and other Heritages so to be purchased, or which would in any manner impede or interfere with the construction, maintenance, or use of the said Railway or Railways, Branch, and Works; and it is further intended, by the said Bill, to take powers to authorise the Company so to be incorporated as aforesaid, to Sell or Lease the said Railway and Work to the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway Company, or the proposed Edinburgh and Bathgate Railway Company, or the Caledonian Railway Company. or other Railway Company or Companies; to authorise the said Company so to be incorporated, to contract with the said Railway Companies, or either or any of them, for the use of their stations, for the purposes of the said intended Railway, or for the working or use of the same; with power to the said Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway Company, or the Caledonian Railway Company, or the proposed Edinburgh and Bathgate Railway Company, or any of them, to Purchase or take on Lease the said intended Railway or Railways, Branch, and Works, or to enter into such contracts as aforesaid accordingly; and so far as may be necessary for the aforesaid purposes, or any of them, to alter and amend the acts relating to the said Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway, and  Caledonian Railway respectively. AND NOTICE IS HEREBY ALSO GIVEN, that Plans, and Sections, and Duplicates thereof respectively, describing the Line or Situation and Levels of the said intended Railway, Branch, and Works, the Roads and others to be diverted as, aforesaid, and showing the extent to which power will be taken to deviate from such Line in executing the said Works, and the Lands and other Heritages to be taken for the purposes aforesaid, together with a Book of Reference thereto, containing the names of the Owners or Reputed Owners, Lessees or Reputed Lessees, and Occupiers of such Lands, will be deposited on or before the 30th day of November next, in the Office, at Edinburgh, of the Principal Sheriff-Clerk of the County of Edinburgh; in the Offices at Lanark and Hamilton respectively, of the Principal. Sheriff-Clerk of the County of Lanark; in the Offices at Stirling and Falkirk, of the Principal Sheriff-Clerk of the County of Stirling and in the Office, at  Linlithgow, of the Principal Sheriff-Clerk of the County of Linlithgow respectively; and that on or before the 31st day of December next, a Copy of so much of the said plans and sections as relate to each of the said several Parishes in or through which the Works are intended to be made, together with a Book of Reference thereto will be deposited with the parish Schoolmaster, if any, and if there he no parish Schoolmaster, then with the Session-Clerk: of each of such parishes, at their respective residences and a copy of ,so much thereof relates to the Town of Bathgate, with the Town  Clerk of that town.

A. & A. MACGEORGE, GLASGOW. DEANS, DUNLOP, & HOPE, WESTMINSTER

Dated this 18th October 1845.

 

Glasgow Herald Monday 24th November 1845

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That application will be made to Parliament in next Session for leave to bring, in a  Bill, or Bills, to enable the SLAMANNAN RAILWAY COMPANY to take and maintain a Railway, or Railways, with all proper Works and Conveniences in connection therewith, and approaches thereto, to commence at or near to the Town of Bathgate, in the Parish of Bathgate, and so proceed to a point in the said Parish, or in the Parish of Muiravonside, or in the Parish of Torphichen at or near to Luggiebrae, and from  thence to diverge on the east to, and to terminate by a Junction with the SLAMANNAN, RAILWAY, at or near to Glensplace, in the Parish of Muiravonside; and on the west to and to terminate by a Junction with the said SLAMANNAN RAILWAY, at or near to Blackstone in the said Parish of Muiravonside, with a Branch Railway or Branch Railways, to connect the said intended Railway, or Railways, with several contemplated Railways terminating at or near to the Town of Bathgate aforesaid, or some one or more of the said contemplated Railways, which intended Railways, and Works, will be situated in and will pass from, through; or into the Parish of Muiravonside in the County of Stirling, and in the parishes of Torpichen and Bathgate, in the County of Linlithgow, or some of them: and also to enable the said Company to make or form and complete a Branch Railway or Railways, and all proper Works and Conveniences in connection therewith, and approaches thereto, from the Main Line of the SLAMANNAN RAILWAY, where the same passes through the Lands of Pirnie Lodge, to, or towards, into or through the Lands of Jawcraig, the Lands of Oaker's Dyke, the Lands of Middlerighead, the Lands of Stonyridge, the Lands of Nappyfaulds, and the Lands of Wester Jaw, Or some of them, and to unite and incorporate the same with the SLAMANNAN RAILWAY, and to maintain and uphold the same; which lastmentioned Branch Railway or Railways are and will be situated in the Parishes of Slamannan and Falkirk, and County of Stirling, or one of them.

AND NOTICE IS ALSO GIVEN, That Plans and Sections describing the Lines and Levels of the said intended Works, and the  Lands and Property which May be required to be taken for the purposes thereof, together with Books of Reference to such  Plans containing the names of the Owners, or reputed Owners, Lessees, or reputed Lessees, and Occupiers of such Lands, and Property, will, on or before the Thirtieth Day of November next, be deposited for public inspection in the office in Linlithgow of the principal Sheriff Clerk of the County of Linlithgow, and in the offices in Stirling and Falkirk, respectively, of the principal Sheriff Clerk of the County of Stirling, and that a copy of as much of the said Plans, Sections and Books of Reference, respectively, as relates to each of the Parishes before specified, will, on or before the Thirty-first Day of December next be deposited for public inspection with the Schoolmaster, or, if there  should be no Schoolmaster, with the Session Clerk of each of such Parishes respectively, at the place of abode of such Schoolmaster or Session Clerk.

 NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN, That it is intended by the said Bill, or Bills, to take powers to deviate in the Construction  of the said several intended Railways and Works from the Lines delineated on the said plans intended to be deposited as aforesaid, to such an extent as will be defined on the said plans, and also to alter and divert such Highways, Turnpike, and other Roads, Railways, Streets, Paths, Passages, Rivers, Canals, Brooks, Streams, Sewers, Waters, and Water Courses, as it may be necessary or expedient to alter or divert for the purpose of making and maintaining, or more conveniently making and maintaining  or using the said intended Railways and Works.

AND NOTICE IS ALSO GIVEN that it is intended by the said Bill or Bills to take powers for the compulsory purchase of Lands and Houses, and it is intended to vary or extinguish all existing rights and privileges connected with the Lands and Houses soto be purchased, or which would in any manner impede or interfere with the construction, maintenance, or use of the said Railways and Works, and to confer other rights and privileges: and also with power to the said Company to levy Tolls, Rates, and Duties on and for the use of the said Railways and Works, and for the conveyance of Passengers and Goods, and it is intended by the said Bill or Bills to confer certain exemptions from payment of such Tolls, Rates, and Duties, and certain other rights and privileges in relation thereto. And it is intended by the said Bill or Bills, to confer powers on  the said Company to enter into and to carry into execution, with any other Companies or Corporations, or any Commissioners, Road Trustees, or other Bodies or Persons, such arrangements and agreements as may be expedient for making the said intended Railways and Works, or maintaining the same and the said SLAMANNAN RAILWAY, or for the use of the same or of the said SLAMANNAN RAILWAY, or of any Railway or Railways communicating therewith or for the Sale or Lease of any portion of the said intended Railways, or of the said SLAMANNAN RAILWAY, or at the said Works, or of any Railway communicating therewith. AND NOTICE IS ALSO GIVEN. That it is proposed by the said  Bill or Bills, for the purposes foresaid and for other purposes, to Alter, lncrease, Amend, Enlarge and in Part Repeal the Powers and Provisions of the following Acts, relating to or concerning the said SLAMANNAN RAILWAY respectively, viz .:-Of an Act  passed in the Session of Parliament held in the Fifth and Sixth Years of William the Forth: and of an Act passed in the Session of Parliament holden in the First Year of Queen Victoria; and ofan Act passed in the Session of Parliament held in the Second and Third Years of Queen Victoria; and to Alter the Tolls, Rates, and Duties granted by the said before-recited Acts, or some of them, or some of the said Tolls, Rates, and Duties; and to Vary or Extinguish any Exemptions from Payment of such Tolls, Rate sand Duties, and other Rights and Privileges in relation thereto and to the said SLAMANNAN RAILWAY; and to Confer certain Exemptions from Payment of the said Tolls, Rates, and Duties as they do now exist or may be so altered, and certain other Rights and Privileges in relation to the same, and in relation to the said SLAMANNAN RAILWAY, or the said intended Railway, and Works; and it is intended to take powers to the said Company to raise an additional sum of Money, by the creation of New Stock, or otherwise, and to alter the gauge of their rails.

AND NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That it is intended by the said Bill or Bills, to exempt the Traffic passing along the said intended Railways from all Custom or Duties leviable or claimed  to be leviable by the Magistrates of the Burgh of Linlithgow, in respect of Animals or Goods entering or passing through the said Burgh, or passing  over the River Avon, under and by virtue of certain Acts relating to such Customs or Duties, and to the said Burgh, passed by the Parliament of Scotland in the Reign of his Majesty James the Sixth, of his Majesty Charles the Second, of his Majesty James the Seventh of Scotland, or under and by virtue of certain Charters and Deeds following thereon, and also to exempt the said Traffic from all other Customs or Dluties Leviable, or intended to be Leviable by any other Corporation or person in respect of Animals or Goods entering into or passing through any Town or over any River on the Line of the said  intended Railways, and with the above objects or otherwise to alter, fix, or limit such Customs or Duties, and to vary, extend, or repeal the powers and provisions of the said Acts relating to the Burgh of Linlithgow, and the Customs and Duties leviable there, herein before recited.

MITCHELL, HENDERSON & MITCHELL, Glasgow.

ARCH. GRAHAME, MONCRIEFF & WEEMS, Westmister, Parliamentary Agents.

Dated this 16th day of October, 1845.

 

Fife Herald 27th November 1845

Scotch Bankrupts

Sequestrations

William Johnston, farmer, cattle-dealer, and grain-dealer at Castlehill, in the parish or Muiravonside.

 

Fife Herald Thursday 27th November, Stirling Observer Thursday 27th November, Thursday 4th December 1845

EDINBURGH & GLASGOW RAILWAY.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, THAT it is intended to apply to Parliament, in the ensuing Session, for an Act or Acts to Alter and Amend, Extend, or Enlarge the Powers and Provisions of the several Acts relating to the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway, passed : respectively in the First and Second, the Third and Fourth, the Fifth, the Seventh and Eighth, and the Eighth and Ninth Years of the Reign of Her present Majesty, together with an Act relating to the Slamannan Junction Railway, passed in the Seventh and Eighth Years of the Reign of Her present Majesty ; and an Act relating to the Glasgow Junction Railway, passed in the Eighth and Ninth Years of the Reign of Her present Majesty, - which two said last mentioned Railways respectively now belong to the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway Company, - by which intended Act or Acts it is proposed to enable the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway Company to Make and Maintain the following Railways, or some of them, or some part or parts thereof, with all proper Works and Conveniences connected therewith, viz. First, - A Railway diverging from and out of the Edinburgh &. Glasgow Railway, at or near to Broomhouse, in the Parish of Corstorphine, in the County of Edinburgh, and terminating at or near to South Queensferry, in the Parish of Queensferry, and to Newhalls, in the Parish of Dalmeny, or one of them, both in the County of Linlithgow, and passing from, through, or into the Parishes, Townships, Burghs, or Places of Corstorphine, Ratho, Currie, Kirkliston, and Cramond, in the County of Edinburgh, and of Kirkliston, Dalmeny, Queensferry, and South Queensferry, in the County of Linlithgow. Second, - A  Railway diverging from and out of the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway, by two forks, at or near to where the said; Railway crosses the River Avon in the Parish of Muiravonside, in the County of Stirling, and terminating at or near to Kersie-Neuk in the Parish of Airth, in the County of Stirling, and passing from, through, or into the Parishes, Townships, Burghs, or Places of Muiravonside, Polmont, Falkirk, Bothkennar, Larbert, Airth, and St Ninian's, in the County of Stirling and Borrowstouness, in the County of Linlithgow, or some of them. Third,- A Branch Railway diverging from and out of the intended Railway last above described, at or near to Chapelton in the Parish of Borrowstouness in the County of Linlithgow, and passing from and through and terminating in the County, at or near to the Town and Harbour of Borrowstouness. Fourth,- A Branch Railway diverging from and out of the intended Railway secondly above described, at or near to Kerse Mains, in the Parish of Falkirk, in the County of Stirling, and terminating at or near the Town and Harbour of Grangemouth, in the Parishes of Falkirk, Bothkennar, and Polmont, in the County of Stirling, or one of them, and passing from, through, or into the Parishes, Townships, Burghs, and Places of Falkirk, Bothkennar, and Polmont, in the County of Stirling, or some or one of them. Fifth,  - A Branch Railway diverging from and out of the intended Railway secondly above described at or near to Bell's Dyke, in the Parish of Airth, in the County of Stirling and passing from and through, and terminating in the same Parish and County, at or near to Higginsneuk. Sixth, - A Railway diverging from and out of the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway, at or near to where the said Railway crosses the Edinburgh & Glasgow Union Canal, in the Parish of Falkirk, in the County of Stirling, and passing from and through and terminating in the same Parish and County, by a Junction with the intended Railway secondly above described, at or near to Kerse Mains. Seventh, - A Railway diverging from and out of the intended  Railway secondly above described at or near to Powbridge, in the Parish of Airth, in the County of Stirling, and terminating by a Junction with the Line of the Scottish Central Railway at or near Skeock, in the Parish of St Ninian's, in the County of Stirling, and passing from, through, or into the Parishes, Townships, Burghs, or Places of Airth and St Ninian's in the County of Stirling, or one of them. Eighth,- A Railway diverging from and out of the Slamannan Junction Railway, at or near to where the same crosses the Edinburgh & Glasgow Union Canal, in the Parish of Muiravonside, in the County of Stirling, and terminating at or near to Gardrum in the Parish of Falkirk, in the said County, and passing from, through, or into the Parishes, Townships, Burghs, or Places of Muiravonside and Falkirk, in the County of Stirling, or one of them. Ninth, - A Railway diverging from and out of the Edinburgh& Glasgow Railway at or near to Seabegs in the Parishes of Falkirk, in the County of Stirling, and terminating at or near to the Town of Denny, in the Parish of Denny, in the County of Stirling, and passing from, through, or into the Parishes, Townships, Burghs, or Places of Falkirk, Dunipace, and Denny, in the County of Stirling, or some of them. Tenth, - A Railway diverging from and out of the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway, at or near to the Croy Station thereof, in the Parishes of Cumbernauld and Kirkintilloch, in the County of Dumbarton, or one of them,  and terminating by a Junction with the Monkland & Kirkintilloch Railway, at or near to Garnqueen Loch, in the Parishes of New Monkland and Cadder, in the County of Lanark, or one of them, and passing from, through, or intothe Parishes, Townships, Burghs, or Places of Cumbernauld and Kirkintilloch, in the County of Dumbarton, and of New Monkland and Cadder, in the County of Lanark, or some of them. Eleventh, - A Railway diverging from and  out of the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway at or near to Springvale, in the Parish of Glasgow or Inner High Church  Parish of Glasgow, in the County of Lanark, and terminating at or near to the Village of Callander, in the Parish of Callander, in the County of Perth, and passing from, through, or into the Parishes, Townships, Burghs, or Places of Glasgow,Inner High Church of Glasgow, Barony of Glasgow,  and Cladder, in the County of Lanark, of East or New Kilpatrick, in the Counties of Dumbarton and Stirling, of Baldernock, Strathblane, Killearn, Balfron, and Drymen, in the County of Stirling, and of Aberfoil, Port-of-Monteith, Kincardine, Kilmadock, and Callander, in the County of Perth, or some of them. Twelfth, - A Branch Railway diverging from and out of the intended Railway last above described at or near to Duntreath Castle, or alternatively at or near to the Village of Strathblane, both in the Parish of; Strathblane, in the County of Stirling, and terminating bya Junction with the Line of the Branch to Lennoxtown of Campsie of the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway at or  near to its proposed termination in the Parish of Campsie, in the County of Stirling, and passing from, through,or into the Parishes, Townships, Burghs, or Places of Strathblane and Campsie, in the County of Stirling,  Thirteenth, - A Branch Railway diverging from and out of the intended Railway eleventhly above described, at or near to Spittal Ballat, in the Parish of Drymen, in the County of Stirling, and terminating at or near to the Village of Balfron, in the Parish of Balfron, in the County of Stirling, and passing from, through, or into the said Parishes of Drymen and Balfron, both in the County of Stirling. Fourteenth, - A Railway diverging from and out of the Branch Line of the Glasgow Junction Railway, called the Branch to the Cut of Junction Canal, at or near to Gaurlay's Distillery, in the' Barony Parish of Glasgow, in the County of Lanark, and passing from and through and terminating in the same Parish and County, upon the Quay of Port-Dundas Basin, at or near to the Glasgow Distillery. Fifteenth - A Railway diverging from and out of the Line of the Glasgow Junction Railway, at or near to where Regent-Street intersects Wellington-Street of Blythswood, in the Barony Parish of Glasgow, in County of Lanark, and passing from and through, and terminating in the same Parish and County, at or near to Blythswoodholm. Sixteenth, - A Railway diverging from and out of the Line of the Glasgow Junction Railway, at or near to where the same is authorised to cross Main-Street of Anderston in the Barony Parish of Glasgow, in the County of Lanark, and terminating at or near to the Slip Dock near Kelvinhaugh, in the said Parish and County, and passing from, through, or into the Parishes, Townships, Burghs, or Places of Glasgow, Barony of Glasgow, and Anderston, or some of them, all in the County of Lanark. Seventeenth, - A Railway diverging from and out of the Line of the Glasgow Junction Railway, at or near to Napier's Dock in the Barony Parish of Glasgow, in the County of Lanark, and terminating at or near to the Slip Dock near Kelvinhaugh in the said Parish and County, and passing from, through, or into the Parishes, Townships, Burghs, or Places of Glasgow, Barony of Glasgow, and Anderston, in the County of Lanark, or some of them. Eighteenth, - A Railway diverging from and out of the Line of the Glasgow Junction Railway, at or near to its termination at Hyde Park-Street, in the Barony Parish of Glasgow, in the County of Lanark, and terminating at or near to the North end of Glasgow Bridge, in the Parish of St. George's of Glasgow, in the County of Lanark, and passing from, through, or into the Parishes, Townships, Burghs, or Places of Glasgow, Barony of Glasgow, St. George's of Glasgow, and Anderston, or some of them, all in the County of Lanark: And it is intended by the said Act or Acts to authorise the alteration of so much of the Line of the said Glasgow Junction Railway as lies between Regent-Street and Douglas-Street of Blythswood, in the City of Glasgow, and the abandonment of the said Line as at present authorised to be made between the said Streets, and the formation, by the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway Company, of a New Line of Railway in lieu thereof, from, or from near the North termination of Wellington- Street of Glasgow, in the Barony Parish of Glasgow, in the County of Lanark, through and terminating within the said Parish by a Junction with the Line of the said Glasgow Junction Railway, at or near to Douglas-Street of Blythswood. And Notice is hereby Given, That it is proposed by the said Act or Acts to enable the Edinburgh A Glasgow Railway Company to purchase and take, or to lease and to maintain and work the Ferry over the River Forth, between Kersie Neuk, in the Parish of Airth, in the County of Stirling, and the Town of Alloa, in the Parish of Alloa, in the County of Clackmannan, and the Ferry over the River Forth, between Higgin's-Neuk, in the Parish of Airth, in the County of Stirling, and the Town of Kincardine, in the Parish of Tulliallan, in the County of Perth, or one of them, and also to purchase and take, or to lease the Harbour of Borrowstouness, and the Tolls, Rates, and Duties leviable by the Trustees of such Harbour, or some part or parts thereof, or to purchase or procure an exemption from such Tolls, Rates or Duties, and to enter into such other agreements with the said Trustees for facilitating the  improvement of the said Harbour, or its use for the purposes of the said Railways and Works as shall be mutually approved of, and to enable the said Trustees to make and complete such Sale, Lease, or Agreement; and with that object to alter and amend, extend or enlarge, and in part repeal the powers and provisions of an Act relating to the said Harbour passed in the Seventh Year of the Reign of Her present Majesty, and to alter the Tolls, Rates, and Duties thereby authorised to be levied. And Notice is hereby further Given, That Plans and Sections describing the Line or situation and levels of the said intended Railways, and also describing the Lands to be taken and used for the purposes aforesaid, together with Books of Reference to such Plans containing the Names of the Owners, or reputed Owners, Lessees, or reputed Lessees, and Occupiers of such Lands, will be deposited on or before the Thirtieth day of November, in the present Year, in the Office of the principal Sheriff-Clerk of the County of Edinburgh, at Edinburgh; in the Office of the principal Sheriff-Clerk of the County of Linlithgow, at Linlithgow ; in the Offices of the principal Sheriff-Clerk of the County of Stirling, at Stirling and also at Falkirk; in the Office of the principal Sheriff -Clerk of the County of Clackmannan, at Alloa; in the Offices of the principal Sheriff-Clerk of the County of Perth, at Perth and also at Dunblane; in the Office of the principal Sheriff-Clerk of the County of Dumbarton, at Dumbarton; and in the Office of the principal Sheriff-Clerk of the County of Lanark, at Glasgow; and that a Copy of so much of the said Plans, Sections, and Books of Reference, as relates to each Parish and Royal Burgh, in or through which the said Railways are intended to be made or altered, will be deposited on or before the Thirty-first day of December next, with the Schoolmaster, or, if there be no Schoolmaster, then with the Session-Clerk of each such Parish, at their respective Dwelling-places, and with the Clerks to the Royal Burghs of South Queensferry, Stirling, and Glasgow, at their Offices in South Queensferry, Stirling, and Glasgow, respectively. And Notice is hereby further Given, That it is proposed by the said Act or Acts to enable the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway Company to acquire compulsorily Lands and Houses for the purposes aforesaid, and to levy Tolls. Rates, and Duties, on and for the use of the said Railways, Ferries, and Works, and to alter the existing Tolls, Rates, and Duties, authorised to be levied by the said recited Acts, or any of them, and to confer, vary, or take away exemptions from the payment of such Tolls, Rates and Duties, and to vary, alter, or extinguish all existing rights and privileges which would in any manner interfere with the objects aforesaid, and to confer other Rights and privileges; and power is also proposed to be taken by the said Act or Acts to divert, alter, or stop up temporarily or permanently, within the Parishes, Townships, Burghs, or places aforesaid, all Turnpike and other Roads, Streets, Railways, Tramways, Canals, Rivers, Streams, and Water-Courses, which it may be necessary to interfere with in the construction or alteration of the said intended Railways, Ferries, and Works. And Notice is hereby further Given, That it is proposed by the said Act or Acts to take power to divert and alter, and permanently to shut up and appropriate the sites of certain Streets or Lanes, or intended Streets or Lanes situated within the Parishes of Barony of Glasgow, Saint George's of Glasgow, and Saint David's of Glasgow, which will be shown upon the said Plans, as intended to be so diverted, altered, or shut up and appropriated. And Notice is hereby Given, That it is intended by the said Act or Acts to exempt the Traffic passing along the said intended Railways or any of them, or any part or parts thereof, from all Customs or Duties leviable, or claimed to be leviable, by the Magistrates of the Burgh of Linlithgow in respect of Animals or Goods entering or passing through the said Burgh, or passing over the River Avon, under and by virtue of certain acts relating to such Customs or Duties, and to the said Burgh, passed by the Parliament of Scotland in the Reigns of His Majesty James the Sixth, of His Majesty Charles the Second, and of His Majesty James the Seventh of Scotland, or under and by virtue of certain Charters and Deeds following thereon, and also to exempt the said Traffic from all other Customs or Duties leviable or claimed to be leviable by any other Corporation or person in respect of Animals or Goods entering into or passing through any Town, or over any River, on the Line of the said intended Railways, and with the above objects, or otherwise to alter, fix, or limit such Customs or Duties, and to vary, extend, or repeal the powers and provisions of the Acts relating to the Burgh of Linlithgow, and the Customs and Duties leviable there, herein before recited. And Notice is hereby further Given, That it is proposed by the said Act or Acts to unite and amalgamate or incorporate with the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway Company, the following Railway Companies, or some of them, viz. - The Scottish Central Railway Company; The Monkland & Kirkintilloch Railway Company; the Ballochney Railway Company; and the Slamannan Railway Company; or alternatively to take power to the said last mentioned Companies, or some of them, to unite and amalgamate or incorporate with the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway Company, or to Sell or Lease to such Company their respective Undertakings, and to enable the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway Company to unite and amalgamate or incorporate with the said Companies, or some of them, or accept a Sale or Lease of the said respective undertakings, or some of them, and to empower the said respective Railway Companies, or some of them, and the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway Company, to enter into agreements with each other, fixing the terms upon which such Amalgamation, Sale, or Lease shall take place, and upon which the Traffic on the said Railways shall be conducted, and for the above purposes to alter and amend, extend or enlarge, and in part repeal the powers and provisions of the several Acts hereinafter recited, and to alter the Tolls, Rates, and Duties thereby authorised to be levied, and to confer, vary, or extinguish exemptions from payment of such Tolls, Rates, and Duties, and other rights and privileges, viz. the Acts relating to the Scottish Central Railway passed in the Eighth and Ninth Years of Her present Majesty - the Acts relating to the said Monkland & Kirkintilloch Railway, passed respectively in the Fifth Year of the Reign of His late Majesty George the Fourth, in the Third and Fourth Years of the Reign of His late Majesty William the Fourth, and in the Second and Third, Sixth and Seventh, and Eighth and Ninth Years of the Reign of Her present Majesty - the Acts relating to the said Ballochney Railway, passed in the Seventh Year of the Reign of His late Majesty George the Fourth, the Fifth and Sixth Years of the Reign of His late Majesty William the Fourth, and the Second and Third and the Sixth and Seventh Years of the Reign of Her present Majesty - the Acts relating to the said Slamannan Railway, passed in the Fifth and Sixth Years of the Reign of His late Majesty William the Fourth, and in the First, and the Second and Third Years of the Reign of Her present Majesty and an Act entitled "An Act to alter, amend, and in part repeal the Acts relating to the Wishaw & Coltness Railway." passed in the Seventh and Eighth Years of the Reign of Her present Majesty, so far as such Act relates to the Monkland & Kirkintilloch Railway. BANNATYNES & KIRK WOOD, Glasgow.

W. O. & W. HUNT, 10 Whitehall, Westminster.

Glasgow, 17th Oct. 1845.

 

The Examiner Saturday 29th November 1845

SCOTCH SEQUESTRATIONS.

W. Johnston, Muiravonside, farmer.

 

London Standard Saturday 29th November 1845

SCOTCH SEQUESTRATIONS.

William Johnston, Castlehill Muiravonside, farmer, Dec. 5th & 26th, at 2 o'clock, at the house of Mr. Gaff, Falkirk.

 

Morning Chronicle Saturday 29th November 1845

SCOTCH SEQUESTRATIONS.

WILLIAM JOHNSTON, of Muiravonside, farmer, December 5th and 26th, at two, at the house of Thomas Gaff, Falkirk.

 

Perry’s Bankrupt Gazette  Saturday 20th December 1845

Meetings under Sequestrations in Scotland.

FRIDAY the 26th of DECEMBER

Johnston W. farmer, Muiravonside Ch. Trustee, Gaff's hotel, Falkirk.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 4th December 1845

PLANS AND BOOKS OF REFERENCE Lodged with the Sheriff-Clerk of the County of Stirling, on and before November, 30 1845, for the Railways afternamed, viz. Avon Water Junction - From Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway, near Castlecarry, to the Scottish Central and Caledonian Junction Railway, near Bridgehouse in Torphichen parish, with a branch to Gardrum in Muiravonside.

Scottish Central and Caledonian Junction - From the Caledadonian near Torphin in Linlithgowshire, to the Edinburgh and Glasgow, near Haining Valley, in Muiravonside.

 

 

Sheffield Independent  Saturday 6th December 1845

SCOTCH SEQUESTRATIONS.

WILLIAM JOHNSTON, of Muiravonside, farmer, December 26th, at two, at the house of Thomas Gaff, Falkirk.

 

Leeds Times Saturday 6th December 1845

SCOTCH SEQUESTRATIONS.

WILLIAM JOHNSTON, of Muiravonside, farmer, December 26th, at two, at the house of Thomas Gaff, Falkirk.

1846

Stirling Observer Thursday 8th January 1846

FARM STOCKING, AGRICULTURAL PRODUCE, FARMING & DAIRY IMPLEMENTS & UTENSILS, AND SUNDRY OTHER EFFECTS.

There will he exposed to Sale, by Public Roup, on the Farm of Castlehill, in the Parish of Muiravonside, occupied by Mr. William Johnston, on SATURDAY, 10th January, 1846, THE entire STOCKING on said Farm, and CROP thereon of 1845, with the whole AGRICULTURAL and DAIRY UTENSILS, and other EFFECTS belonging thereto, embracing

1. BESTIAL.

2 Horses. 2 Mares. 1 One-year-old Quey. 7 Pigs. 2 One-year-old Bulls, and 4 Calves. 3 Milch Cows.

2. CROP.

23 Stacks of Oats. About 9 Scots Acres of Excellent Turnips. 5 Stacks of Barley. 2 Stacks of Wheat. A lot of Hay Seeds. 1 Hay Rick. A lot of Barley and Oat Straw. A lot of Potatoes.

3. AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS, &c.

A Thrashing Mill and Machinery, with Water Wheel 2 Ploughs. 1 Bulking Plough and a Stone Roller. A Pair of Fanners and Barn Utensils. 2 Cast-metal Boilers. 3 Carts, with Wheels and Iron Axles. 4 Sets Cart and Plough Harness.

4. AN ASSORTMENT OF DAIRY UTENSILS;

As also a quantity of MANURE and some GUANO, with various other effects.

Sale to begin at Ten o Clock Forenoon.

Three Months Credit on Approved Bills.

Falkirk, 2d January, 1846.

 

Perry’s Bankrupt Gazette - Saturday 31 January 1846

Meetings under Sequestrations in Scotland.

TUESDAY, the 3d of FEBRUARY.

1845 Johnston W. farmer and grain dealer, Muiravonside. To decide offer, House of Gaff, innkeeper, Falkirk.

 

Falkirk Herald, Observer 12th March Stirling, Glasgow Herald 13th March 1846

EASTERN DISTRICT OF STIRLINGSHIRE AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION.

The spring show took place on Thursday last, the 5th curt, within the corn-market, Falkirk. Long previous to 12 o'clock, when the different lots were brought forward, an anxious crowd had besieged the gates of the show-yard, which continued to increase during the day, and kept up a scene of much bustle and animation. The following list comprises the award of the judges, who were Messrs. Thomson, Inveravon; Mitchell, Kinniel-carse; and Hardie, Bonessmains, for grain; and Messrs. Laing, Rankine, and Ewing, of Glasgow, for fat cattle. And we are simply doing justice by recording the difficulty they had to combat, where all was so nicely balanced.

GRAIN.

For the best 4 qrs. barley, grown in the southern part of the district - 1st, Mr. Forbes of Callendar; 2d, Mr. Forbes.

For ditto, grown in the northern part of the district - 1st, Mr. A. Thomson, Newtonmains; 2d, Mr. Henry Reid, Haining-valley.

For the best 4 qrs. short oats, of the potato or Flemish kind, grown in the northern part of the district - Mr. Mitchell, Island, Grangemouth.

For the best 4 qrs. long oats, grown in the southern part of the district - 1st, Mr. Forbes; 2d, Mr. Forbes. For the best ditto, grown in the northern part of the district - 1st, Mr. Stark, Camelon; 2nd, Mr. Fulton, Sunnyside.

For the best 4 qrs. beans, grown in the district - 1st, Mr. Hardie, Bothkennar; 2nd, Mr. Johnstone, Beancorse.

For the best 2 qrs. perennial ryegrass seeds, grown in the southern part of the district - Mr. Renny, Craigburn.

For do. do., grown in the northern part of the district - Mr. Stark, Camelon.

FAT CATTLE.

For the two best cattle, of weight, symmetry, and quality for the flesher - Mr. Henry Reid, Haining-valley. For the two second best ditto - Mr. Forbes.

For the best one, exclusive of those gaining the above two prizes - Mr. Callander, Woodburn. CHEESE. For the best specimen of full milk cheese, made by the exhibitor, within the district, in 1845, the quantity not being less than half a cwt. - Mr. Arthur, Pirliehill.

For the best do. skimmed milk do. do. - Mr. Arthur.

SALT BUTTER.

For the best lot of salt butter, made by the exhibitor, within the district - 1st, Mr. John Stark, Westerglen; 2nd, Mr. Renny, Craigburn; 3rd, C. Stirling, Esq. of Muiravonside.

Immediately after the show, a sale, by public roup, took place, of a large number of fat cattle, including the animals that had been exhibited and taken prizes. When we state that this important sale was entrusted to the management of Mr. James Neilson, auctioneer, whose peculiar tact and thorough knowledge of such stock was quite calculated to do it justice - and, on such an occasion as this, he had ample scope to give credit at once to the splendid animals and their rearers - we are sure it will not excite surprise that some sixteen pair of fat cattle realised £527 10s. besides a pair bought in at £52s. This is certainly flattering to all parties, and must influence the next show. We would add, that on no previous occasion have finer specimens of fat stock graced any show. Those of Mr. Reid were truly superb; outdoing any former evidence he has given of his established skill as a rearer. The same may be said of the others; and we heard the judges declare that the Highland Society's exhibition never elicited better. The business of the day concluded with a dinner in the Red Lion Inn. Besides a numerous assemblage of members, many gentlemen, connected with agriculture, from a distance, were present. The chair was occupied by William Forbes, Esq. of Callendar, M.P. Captain Forbes, of the Coldstream Guards, acting as the efficient croupier. The usual loyal, and many other appropriate toasts were heartily responded to; and, amid much interesting matter, it was insisted that sound seed is the sole salvation on which will depend this year's crop of potatoes. Mr. Stirling, of Glenbervie, whose experience as a farmer ranks so high, was listened to, on this and other topics, with much profit, we trust, and high pleasure. In concluding our brief report of this now influential society's show, it may simply be necessary to state, what, indeed, we have before reiterated, that it seems only necessary for the grand march of agriculture in this country, that a few influential landlords, backed by skilful and energetic farmers, have to put their resolute hands to the plough; and all 'looking back' will only, as in this instance be to behold luxuriant fields, doubly-filled stackyards, rich dairies, and the most splendidly-thriving breeds of cattle and horses; in a word, abundance for ourselves raised by ourselves!

 

Falkirk Herald, 12th March 1846

STRIKE OF RAILWAY LABOURERS.

At the Slamannan and Edinburgh & Glasgow Junction Railway, presently in the course of formation through the parish of Muiravonside, a strike for increase of wages took place last week among the labourers employed on the line. There were fully 200 employed here, and at first the whole of them struck work, but, after standing out for a day or so, about one-half of that number intimated to the contractors their readiness to return, provided they were protected from violence at the hands of those who still stood out. A body of county police was accordingly procured from Falkirk, and attended at the works for nearly two days, by which time the whole of the disaffected were paid off and left the place; and the others, we are now glad to learn, are proceeding peaceably with the work.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 19th March 1846

EXTENSIVE SALE or VALUABLE FARM STOCKING, SPLENDID MILCH COWS, YOUNG CATTLE, FIRST-RATE DRAUGHT HORSES, CORN AND BARLEY STACKS, HAY, New TRASHING-MILL, HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE, &C. &C. AT CROSSCRAES. To be Sold, by Public Roup, on SATURDAY, the 21st day of March, 1846, on the Farm of Crosscraes, in the parish of Muiravonside, THE whole CROP, MILCH COWS, YOUNG CATTLE, DRAUGHT HORSES, THRASHING- MILL, FARM STOCKING, HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE, and other Valuable Effects thereon, belonging to the deceased Mr. Robert Boyd, comprising:

l6 Stacks of Oats and Barley.

3 Stacks of Seed Ryegrass Hay, and one large Hay Stack.

2 Particularly famous Draught Horses.

1 Draught Horse, aged.

11 Milch Cows, the finest stock that has been rouped for several years, and the greater part of them very near the calving.

4 Two-year-old Queys.

6 One year-old Stirks, and one two-year-old Bull.

3 Close-bodied Carts. with wheels and axles.

2 Open Carts and Hay Waggons, full mounted.

1 Cart with Water Barrel. 2 Iron Ploughs, and 2 Pair of Harrows.

A most complete three horse Thrashing Mill, not more than 3 years old, erected by Mr. Law of Shetleston, on the newest and most improved principle.

1 Pair of new Barn Fanners, as recommended by the Highland Society.

2 Sets of Cart and Plough Horse Harness.

A Land Roller and Frame.

A Machine Cheese Press, and 8 Stone Troughs for Cattle.

20 Bolls of Thrashed Oats. 4 Loads of Oat Meal.

12 Bolls of Seed Potatoes, and a few tons of Turnips; with the whole of the Farming Implements and Dairy Utensils, &c. &c. Likewise.

Household Furniture, consisting of a set of Mahogany Dining Tables.

2 Mahogany Escritoirs, Stuff-bottomed Chairs, a large Convex Mirror, with gilt frame;

4 Bedsteads and Bedding; also, Sheets, Linen, and other Napery;

3 spendid Kitchen Range or Grate, with Boiler and Oven for a round-about fire - very valuable; an Eight-day Clock, several Napery Presses; and an immense variety of other valuable articles and effects, which cannot be described within the limits of an advertisement.

The whole to be Sold without reserve.

 Three months Credit will be given on bills, or discount for Cash.

Roup to begin at Ten o'Clock Forenoon.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

 

 

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 25th; Glasgow Herald Friday 26th; London Standard; Hereford Times Saturday 27th;  Sussex Advertiser, Tuesday 30th June; Derby Mercury Wednesday 1st; Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette Thursday 2nd July, 1846

FALKIRK.

Waterspout.- A. striking and unusual phenomenon was observed at Falkirk on Wednesday the 17th inst. The day had been unusually warm, perhaps the hottest of the season - the thermometer standing at 78 in the shade, and a suffocating sultriness gave the heavens quite a tropical character. Towards six o'clock p.m. a dark thunder-cloud was borne slowly along from the west, and when its centre was seemingly over the Black Loch, a spout rather suddenly appeared till its extreme end was hidden behind the Callendar Wood. We have since learned that the spout discharged itself, or broke, as the country people termed it, at Cross Road, a rising ground about a mile west from Avonbridge. An immense body of water deluged the immediate spot, and for about a mile round there was a heavy rain, but beyond not a drop fell. The rivulets all around were flooded, and the river Avon assumed, for a short time, all the appearance of a spate.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 25th June 1846

The Weather.

For the last three weeks the weather was in general very warm, the thermometer standing about 70 degrees in the shade. Often the heat was most oppressive. With such genial weather the crops never looked better, and are considered from fourteen to twenty days earlier than in ordinary seasons. - Of late a number of rare phenomena have been observed. The mock suns were seen to great advantage about three weeks since. On each side and equidistant from the sun an arc was formed, and at each of these points a beautiful image of the sun appeared, also a display of the prismatic colours. It was about six o'clock evening and the appearance continued for some time. - On the afternoon of Monday last, the falling of the barometer indicated a change of weather. After a lowering sky the rain fell in copious showers, accompanied by a thunder storm, throughout the evening. On Tuesday the air was cool, with a heavy fall of rain. The fields appear fresh and luxuriant, promising for the present an early and abundant harvest.

 

 

London Standard Friday 18th September, Morning Post Saturday 19th September, 1846

THE HARVEST

FALKIRK DISTRICT.

The carse and dry- field farmers in this district have got their crops nearly all secured in the barnyard; and the muirland farmers are making rapid progress with theirs also, and will have the fields generally cleared by the end of this week, if the weather continue favourable. Wheat in the carses here may be said to be an average crop this season ; but oats are under the average. Barley and beans are very deficient on both carse and dry - field. Beans will not average above four bolls an acre Scotch, if they even come as high; and barley will not average above five bolls per acre, when taken carse and dry-field together, which may be said to be a deficiency of three and a half bolls on the acre of beans, and three boll's on the acre of barley, from the average of ten years, supposing the beans to be seven and a half, and the barley eight bolls as average crops per acre. The oats in the muirlands at Slamannan and Muiravonside may be said to be an average crop. The turnip crop is rather deficient in many- cases here, although there are some good fields in the neighbourhood. The turnips upon stiff clayey lands suffered much from the wet weather in July and August. Hay is an excellent crop here, and I have never seen the pasture grass looking better at this season than what it is just now, for the last ten years.

 Edinburgh Weekly Register.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 12th November 1846

COUNTY OF STIRLING. PROPERTY TAX.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,

That MEETINGS for Hearing Appeals against Assessments for Property and Income Tax, for the Year 1846, will be held at the following places, on the days undermentioned, at 11 o'Clock Forenoon each day, viz.

FALKIRK DISTRICT, Comprehending the Town and Parishes of FALKIRK, MUIRAVONSIDE, AIRTH, SLAMANAN, BOTHKENNAR, POLMONT, within the Court-Room, Falkirk, on THURSDAY the 26th instant.

 

 

1847

 

Caledonian Mercury Monday 11th January, Aberdeen Journal Wednesday 13th January,

Stirling Observer 14th January 1847

BIRTHS.

At Muiravonside Manse, on the 7th instant, Mrs. McFARLANE, of a daughter.

 

Caledonian Mercury Monday 15th February 1847

Private Correspondence

LINLITHGOW.-On Saturday last, one of the keenest and best contested games at curling that has taken place this season, came off at Bathgate, between 24 curlers from each parish, and comprising six rinks. At the close of the game, the numbers were Linlithgow, 138-Bathgate, 135-majority, three shots the curlers of Linlithgow seem to be quickly regaining their long lost preeminence amongst the curlers of Scotland, having, on Tuesday last, beat the far-famed curlers of Muiravonside, in Linlithgow Loch, by a majority of 26 shots! There being 20 players on each side - and having won several other matches this season.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 18th March 1847

STIRLING AND CLACKMANNAN.

ASSESSED TAXES. - 1846-7.

THE COMMISSIONERS have fixed the following days for hearing APPEALS against the ASSESSMENT for the Year ending 25th May, 1547. Parties aggrieved must lodge Appeals, in writing, with Mr. CAMPBELL, Surveyor, Port Street, Stirling, at least eight days before the respective Courts, and must appear personally, on the undermentioned days in support of the same, otherwise they will be held as departed from: -

For DISTRICT of FALKIRK, Comprehending Parishes of Falkirk, Polmont, Muiravonside, Slamannan, Airth, Bothkennar, and Larbert - In the CROWN INN, FALKIRK, on TUESDAY the 30th March current, at Twelve o' Clock Noon.

 

Stirling Observer 25th March 1847

FOR SALE, A PROPERTY,

Consisting of about 4 1/2 imperial acres of Arable Land, with DWELLING-HOUSE, BARN, and BYRE, situated at Maddiston, in the Parish of Muiravonside, Stirlingshire, presently occupied by Mr. William Robertson, one mile from Polmont Station on the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway, affording a Vote for the County. The public burdens are trifling. For particulars apply, to J. H. Brown, 6, Hanover Street, Edinburgh; or to James Lowrie, Bankhead, Dalkeith, by whom offers will be received until the 15th April next.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 1st April 1847

PROPERTY AND INCOME TAX.

 COUNTIES OF STIRLING, CLACKMANNAN, AND LINLITHGOW.

NOTICE is Hereby Given to all Persons Assessed under the Property and Income Tax Act, that the Tax for the year to 5th April, 1847, became due upon the 20th instant, and as peremptory instructions have been received to make an early collection for the current year, all parties liable are hereby required to make payment without delay. For the greater convenience of the public, the Collector will attend personally to receive payment at the places and at the times undermentioned, and it is particularly requested that parties will avail themselves of the opportunity thus afforded them of making payment in their respective districts : -

At Polmont, within Walker's Inn, upon Saturday the 24th April, from 10 to 1 o'Clock, for the Parishes of Polmont and Muiravonside.

ROB. CAMPBELL, Jun., Collector.

OFFICE OF STAMPS AND TAXES Stirling, 25th March, 1847.

 

Stirling Observer 15th , 22nd & 29th April 1847

There will be exposed to Sale, by Public Roup, within the House of Mr. Thomas Gaff, Innkeeper, Falkirk, on THURSDAY the 20th day of May next, at Two o’clock Afternoon, ALL and WHOLE that ANGLE of GROUND of TARDUFF MUIR, bounded by a part of said Muir on the West, by the road leading to Linlithgow Bridge on the South, and by another road on the East and North parts, as particularly mentioned in the Titles thereof; together with the DWELLING-HOUSES and BUILDINGS thereon. The above subjects, the present tenants of which are Messrs Alexander Rintoul and John Duncan, are held upon a Lease for 999 years, and the Houses and Buildings are new, let readily, and commands good tenants. The gross rental for the ensuing year is fixed at £11 9s. The vacant Ground might be most advantageously built on. For particulars apply to Adam Smith or Alexander Smith, Writers, Falkirk, either of whom will exhibit the Titles and Articles of Roup. Falkirk, 5th April, 1847.

 

 

Stirling Observer  June 17th 1847

THE EASTERN DISTRICT OF STIRLINGSHIRE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY'S SHOW.

The stock which appeared at this show on Thursday the 3d current was quite equal to that of former years; and as the day was singularly fine, there was a good attendance of farmers and others interested in the promotion of farm industry. The following is a list of the premiums awarded : -AYRSHIRE BREED. For the best Cow, bought or bred, by Mr. Henry Reid, Hainingvalley, a silver medal, value 3 sovs., and 1 sov., in addition by Mr. Oswald, Gilston - Mr. Reid, Haining valley;

For the second best do., 1 sov., by Henry Aitken, Esq.,writer, and 10s. from the Society - Mr. Reid.

For the best two cows out of one byre, 2 sovs., given by Joseph Dawson, Esq., Carron Works - William Forbes, Esq. of Callander, MP.;

For the second best do., 1 sov. by Mr. Hamilton, landsteward, Callendar, and 10s. added by the Society - Mr. Reid, Hainingvalley.

For the best cow bred, 2 sovs., by Andrew Milne, Esq. of Haypark Mr. Rennie, Craigburn;

For the second best do., by Mr. Rennie, Craigburn, 1 sov. - Mr Rennie.

For the best pair of Cows bred, 2 sovs. by Mr. Reid, Hainingvalley - Mr. Robertson, Myrehead;

For the second best do., 1 sov. by Robt. Adam, Esq., banker, Falkirk - Mr. Taylor, Broomage Mains.

For the best Cow, bought or bred, with her last year's Calf, by Henry Salmon, Esq. of Bonnyside, 2 sovs., and 1 sov. from William M'Kenzie Learmonth, Esq. of Craigend - Mr. Reid;

For the second best do., by Mr. Rennie, Craigburn, 1 sov., and 10s. by the Society - Mr. Rennie.

For the best three-year-old Quey, bought or bred, by Mr. Rennie, Craigburn, 2 sovs. Mr. Reid;

For the second best do., by Wm. Callander, Esq. of Woodburn, 1 sov. - Mr. Stark, Wester Glen.

For the best two-year-old Quey in milk, bought or bred, by Graham Hardie, Esq., Falkirk Iron Works, 1 sov. - Mr. Robertson, Mvrchead ;

For the second best do., by Mr. John Jones, Falkirk 10s. - Mr. Reid.

For the best two-year-old Quey in calf, by Mr. Jas. Hardie, Laurieston, 1 sov., and 5s. by John Urquhart, Esq. of Vellore. - Mr. Hardie, Laurieston;

For the second best do., by Mr. John Urquhart, 15s. - Mr. Reid.

For the best two-year-old Quey, not in calf, by John Gardner, Esq. of Milnquarter, 1 sov. -  Mr. Rennie; For the second best do., by Mr. Morton, Laurieston, 10s., and 2s. 6d. from the Society- Mr. Hardie;

For the third best do., by Mr. Morrison, Grangemouth, 10s. - Wm. C. L. M'Kenzie, Esq. of Craigend.

For the best Bull of any age, not exceeding 5 years old, by John Wilson, Esq. Bantaskine, 2 sovs., and a silver medal by Mr. Stark, Camelon, value 2 sovs., also a sovereign from the Society - Mr.Reid;

For the second best do., by Alexr. M'Farlane, Esq. of Thornhill, 1 sov., and 2 sovs. added by the Society - Mr. Taylor, Broomage Mains.

For the best two-year-old Bull, by Wm. Callander, Esq. of Woodburn, 1 sov., a silver medal, value 1 sov. by the Secretary, and 1 sov. in addition by the Society - Mr. Reid;

For the second best do., by the Secretary, a silver medal, value 1 sov. - James Clark, Esq. of Newlands; For the third best do., by Mr. Arthur, Pirleyhill, 10s. 6d. - Mr Ronald, Cauldhame.

For the best one-year-old Bull, by Geo. Gray. Esq. of Windyett, 1 sov. Mr. Rennie;

For the second best do., by Mr. David Smith, innkeeper, Falkirk, 10s. - Mr. Reid.

For the best one-year-old Quey, by Mr. Rennie, Craigburn, 1 sov. - Mr. Robertson, Myrehead;

For the second best do., by Mr .Smith, inkeeper, Falkirk, 10s. - Mr. Robertson;

For the third best do., by Mr. Guy, farmer, Polmont-hill, 5s. - Mr. Rennie.

For the best pair of year-old Queys, by Jas. Russell, Esq., Clydesdale Bank, 1 sov. - Mr. Robertson;

For the second best do., by Mr. Alexander Nimmo, Whiterigg, 10s. - Mr. Stark, Wester Glen.

Competed for by Tenants whose Rent does not exceed £100.

For the best Cow, bought or bred, by Mr. Stirling of Miuravonside, 2 sovs. - Mr. Arthur, Pirleyhill;

For the second best do., 10s. from Mr. Fulton of Sunnyside, and 10s. from Mr. Menzies - Miss Anne Taylor, Manuelburn Bridge.

For the best Cow bred, by Mr. Stirling of Muiravonside, 1 sov. - Mr. Taylor, Barleyside;

For the second best do., by William Gray, Esq. of Summerhouse, 10s. - Mr. Taylor, Barleyside.

For the best two-year-old Quey in milk, by the Society, 1 sov. -  Mr. Stark, Wester Glen;

For the second best do., by Alexander Smith, Esq., writer, Falkirk, 10s. - Mr. Jarvie, Greencraig.

For the best two-year-old Quey in calf, by Mr. William Nelson Greenwells, 10s. - Mr. Arthur, Pirleyhill;

For the second best do., by Mr. Herriot, V.S., Falkirk, 5s. Mr. Taylor, Barleyside.

For the best two-year-old Quey, not in calf, by Geo. Law, Esq., factor, Kerse, 1 soy. - Mr. Arthur;

For the second best do., by A. Smith, Esq., writer, 10s. -Mr. Taylor, Barleyside.

For the best one-year-old Quey, by Mr. John Stark, Wester Glen, 12s. 6d. - Do.do.;

For the second best do 7s 6d Mr. Stark.

BUTTER.

For the best 3 lbs. of Fresh Butter, produced in the district, and made up in half-pound rolls, by Bailie Kier, grocer, Falkirk, a gold ring, value 1 sov. - Mr. Stark, Wester Glen ;

For the second best do., by Mr. Henry Weir, cooper, Falkirk, a Lady's Work Box, value 15s. - Mr. Reid;

For the third best do., by Mr. Andrew Taylor, Broomage Mains, 10s. - Jas. Clark, Esq. of Newlands-

For the fourth best do., by the Society, 7s. Gd. - Mr. Guy Polmonthill.

For the best lot of Powdered Butter, produced in the district, the quantity to be not less than 6 lbs., by Mr.Thos. Miller grocer' Falkirk, a handsome Silver-mounted Tea-pot, Sugar-bowl, and Cream-pot, value 27s. 6d. - Mr. Gays ;

For the second best do., by Mr. Burns, cooper 10s., and 5s. from the Society - Thomas C. Burns, Esq. of Avondale ;

For the third best do., by the Society 10s. - Mr. Rennie, Craigburn ;

For the fourth best do., by the Society, 7s. 6d. - Mr. Taylor, Barleyside. Draught Horses.

For the best Brood Mare for agricultural purposes, foaled, or in foal, by Win. Callander, Esq. of Woodburn, 2 sovs.  - Mr. Bowie, Gilmcadowland;

For the second best do, by Dr. Walker of Polmont Bank, 1 sov. Mr. Dobbie, Seamores;

For the third best do., by Mr. John Learmonth, Carmuirs, 10s. - Mr. Rennie.

For the best Btood Mare for agricultural purposes, not in foal, by Mr. John Wilson, Jinkabout, 1 sov., also by James Aitken, Esq. of Gartcows, 1 sov. - Mr. Arthur. Pirleyhill;

For the second best do., by Wm. Callander, Esq. of Woodburn, 1 sov. - Mr. Wilson, Jinkabout;

For the third best do., by Mr. Arthur, Pirleyhill, 10s. Mr.Wilson. 

For the best two-year-old Filly, by Mr. Alexander Thomson, Newton Mains, 1 sov. - Wm. Forbes,Esq. Callendar, M.P. ;

For the second best do., by Mr. Maxwell Irvine, 10s. - Mr. Bowie, Gilmeadowland.

For the best year-old Filly, by James Nelson, Esq., auctioneer, Falkirk, a silver medal, value 21s. - Mr. Learmonth, Carmuirs;

For the second best do., by Mr. Robert Mitchell, Redding, 10s. - Mr. Stark, Camelon, -

For the best year-old Colt, by Mr. Dobbie of Seamores, 1 sov. - Mr Dobbie;

For the second best do., by Mr. R. Robertson, Myrehead, 10s. 6d. - Mr. Robertson.

For the best Foal, 1 sov., from Mr. Bowie, Gilmeadowland - Mr. Bowie.

A Sweepstakes took place between Mr. Reid and Mr. Rennie, for the best three-year-old Queys and three-year-old Bulls, gained by Mr. Rennie.

The judges were Messrs Baird, Lochwood; Young, Harvieswood; and Anderson, Smithston.

After the show, the usual dinner took place in the Red Lion Inn - Chas. Stirling, Esq. of Muiravonside in the chair; Bailie Kier acting as croupier.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 19th August 1847

INTIMATION.

IN an Application presented to the Commissary of Stirlingshire for Ann Miller, residing in Bainsford; Mary Miller, Wife of Hugh Caldwell, Miner, Carronshore ; and the said Hugh Caldwell, her Husband, for his interest; Janet Miller, Wife of Alexander Murdoch, Collier at New Cairnbro; and'the said Alexander Murdoch, her Husband, for his interest; Ann Mitchell, Wife of James Crauford, Mason in Lauricston; and the said James Crauford, her Husband, for his interest; MARGARET GRINDLAY, Wife of James Offingham, Printer in Edinburgh ; and the said James Offingham, her Husband, for his interest; Jean Grindlay, residing in Dean Street, Edinburgh, Widow of the deceased James Horn, Mason there; and James Grindlay, Currier, lately residing at Otley, near Leeds, in Yorkshire, now residing in Linlithgow -

 craving his Lordship to restrict the Caution to be found in a Confirmation to be expede by them as Executors dative qua nearest in kin to the deceased Miss BETHIA DICK, of Campston, in the Parish of Muiravonside, and County of Stirling, who died on or about the twentysixth day of April last, to the sum of Fifty Pounds Sterling : - the Commissary, by interlocutor, dated 11th August, 1847, appointed the Petitioners to intimate by Advertisement in the Stirling Journal, and Stirling Observer, and North British Advertiser, the import of the prayer of the Petition, that all interested might be cerciorated of the application ; and ordained any persons having objections to the prayer of the Petition being granted to lodge the same with the Clerk of Court within ten days from the date of the Advertisements, with certification: of all which intimation is hereby given accordingly.

LISTON & SALMON, Petitioners' Agents.

Falkirk, 12th August, 1847.

 

Stirling Observer 9th September 1847

On Saturday last, two boys met with a sudden and melancholy death at Blackbraes Colliery, owing to the wagons, which run on an inclined plane, coming in contact with them. A third was severely bruised, but he is recovering.

 

 

Glasgow Herald Friday 8th October 1847

SCOTCH BANKRUPTS.

(From the Edinburgh Gazette of Tuesday, October 5th)

Oct. 2. JOHN WHYTOC, proprietor of Thatchridge, in the parish of Muiravonside; and county of Stirling, and coal dealer, residing there. Creditors to meet within the writing-chambers of Messrs. Liston and Salmon, writers in Falkirk, 13th October and 3d November, at twelve o'clock.

 

Perry’s Bankrupt Gazette Saturday 9th October 1847

SEQUESTRATIONS IN SCOTLAND.

WHYTOCK John, coal dealer, Muiravonside; 13th Oct 3d Nov. twelve, chambers of Liston and co. Falkirk. Claims to be lodged by April.

 

London Standard Saturday 9th October 1847

SCOTCH SEQUESTRATIONS.

John Whytock, of Muiravonside, Stirlingshire, coal dealer, Oct. 13, Nov. .T, at 11 o'clock, at the chambers of Messrs. Liston and Salmon, Falkirk.

 

Fife Herald 14th October 1847

SCOTCH BANKRUPTS

SEQUESTRATIONS

John Finnie and Company, steel manufacturers at Avon Steel Works, parish of Muiravonside, and county of Stirling. The Company carrying on business as merchants in Glasgow, under the firm of Ewing, Smith, and Aird, and in Calcutta under the firm of Smith, Ewing, and Company. 

 

Perry’s Bankrupt Gazette  Saturday 16th October,11th December,  Hull Packet, Friday 22nd October

Newcastle Guardian and Tyne Mercury , Sheffield Independent  Saturday 23rd October 1847

Meetings under Sequestrations in Scotland.

WEDNESDAY,the 20th of OCTOBER

1847 Finnie and co. steel manufacturers, Muiravonside ........ Ch. interim fctr. Red Lion, Falkirk

 

Leeds Intelligencer Saturday 16th October 1847

SCOTCH SEQUESTRATIONS.

J. Whytock, Muiravonside, Stirlingshire, coal dealer, Oct. 13, Nov. 3, at 12, at the chambers of Messrs Liston and Salmon, Falkirk.

 

Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper  Sunday 17th October, Perry’s Bankrupt Gazette Saturday 30th October, 6th , 20th November 1847

SCOTCH SEQUESTRATIONS.

J. Whytock, coal dealer, Muiravonside, Stirling, to meet Oct. 13 and Nor. 3, within the chambers of Messrs Liston and Salmon, Falkirk, at twelve.

 

Stirling Observer 21st October 1847

Marriage.

At Bowhouse, Stirlingshire, on the 15th instant, by the Rev. J. Ker, of Polmont, John Grubb Urquhart Esq., younger of Vellore, to Jessie, youngest daughter of Alex. Kincaid, Esq. of Bowhouse.

 

 

 

Caledonian Mercury Monday 25th October; Fife Herald Thursday 28th October, 1847

At Edinburgh, on the 19th current, the Rev. A. DODDS, of Avonbridge, to ELIZABETH WAUGH, daughter of the late George Anderson, Esq. of her Majesty's Customs, Greenock.

 

Caledonian Mercury Monday 25th October; Northampton Mercury Saturday 30th October 1847

On the 21st instant, at Parkhall House, by the Rev. James M'Farlane, of Muiravonside, George Adam, Esq., late of Bombay, to Miss Colville Livingston Learmouth, of Parkhall, sister of the late John Livingston Learmouth, Esq.,of Parkhall, Stirlingshire, and formerly of Calcutta.

 

Dundee, Perth, and Cupar Advertiser  Tuesday 9th November, London Daily News Wednesday 10th November, Aberdeen Journal Wednesday 17th November 1847

SUPPOSED MURDER.

On Tuesday morning last, the body of a woman was found in the Union Canal, near Causewayend, Muiravonside, Stirlingshire, and the circumstances under which it was discovered readily induced strong presumptions that the deceased had met her death by unfair means; but the perpetrators of the malevolent act, it is feared, will never be brought to the bar of justice, in consequence of the absence of all clue to circumstantial or presumptive evidence in the case. The body appeared to have been from ten to twenty days in the water, and bore marks of numerous stabs or cuts with a sharp weapon. She was found almost naked, but the vestiges of her attire which remained were of the most threadbare description, and seemed to mark, her out as a pauper or vagrant. Her age was from about forty-eight to fifty-five; she was rather stout-made, and above the ordinary size. She cannot be recognised by any persons in the immediate district; it is therefore probable she was a stranger, or that the murder had been committed somewhere between Edinburgh and Falkirk, and the corpse conveyed by a coal boat or lighter and thrown into the Canal near the place where she was discovered.

 

1848

 

Falkirk Herald 10th February 1848

THE EASTERN DISTRICT OF STIRLINGSHIRE AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION.

Patron. WM. FORBES, Esq. of Callander, M.P.

President. The Right Hon. the EARL of ZETLAND.

Vice-Presidents. Charles Stirling, Esq. of Muiravonside. Henry Salmon, Esq. of Bonnyside. Joseph Dawson, Esq., Carron. Andrew Milne, Esq. of Haypark.

Committee. Dr Walker of Polmont Bank. J. B. Ralston, Esq. of Glen James Aitken, Esq. of Gartcows. Ellrig. Mr Stark, Camelon. Mr Reid, Haining Valley. Mr Robertson, Myrehead. Mr Wilson, Nicolton. Mr Dobbie, Seamores. Mr Johnston, Beancross. Mr Hardie, Laurieston. Mr Arthur, Pirleyhill. Mr. Walker, Jaw. Mr. Morrison, Mungalhead.

THE promoters of this Association beg to submit to the favourable consideration of the public, the peculiarly strong claims they have upon the Inhabitants of the Eastern District of the County, and of the County generally, for support and co-operation. The great, indeed it may be said the sole object of this Association, which has now been in existence for a number of years, is to promote the interests of Agriculture, by exciting amongst the practical Farmers and Graziers in the district a spirit of friendly and wholesome emulation ; and although, unfortunately, the sphere of its operations has not been so wide and comprehensive as might have been desired, yet even in its comparatively circumscribed state, it has, to a great extent, realised the hopes and fulfilled the expectations of its originators, - - and it is believed that many of the improvements introduced of late years into this neighbourhood, in the cultivation of the ground as well as in the rearing and feeding of cattle, may be justly attributed to the stimulus the Association has afforded, and the spirit of competition it has created amongst the Agriculturists in the district. The funds subscribed are distributed yearly at stated times in the shape of Prizes, amongst those Competitors who exhibit the greatest skill, and attain to the greatest excellence, in the various branches of Practical Agriculture; and there can be no doubt that this system of awarding Premiums acts as an incentive to practical men to use extra exertions in the management of their Farms and Stock, and is thus productive of real and permanent benefit to the Competitors, - - to those parties for whose behoof the Society was originally constituted and is now maintained. It is a matter of regret that the efforts of the promoters of this Association, although so far successful, have not met with such cordial support as might have been expected, considering the disinterested and public-spirited objects they have in view: and as this is an Association designed to advance the public good, and capable of conferring benefits not only upon Farmers and Graziers, but likewise upon Proprietors and the community at large, it is hoped that it may, for the future, receive an enlarged degree of countenance, and be enabled to rank amongst its supporters the names of men of all grades and professions. The promoters of the Society earnestly trust that renewed exertions will be made to increase its efficiency, by increased subscriptions, and that all parties will join in a liberal and hearty desire to maintain and extend its usefulness. It is meant and desired that the Association should be of advantage to all classes of Agriculturists. It has always been kept scrupulously free from individual and party influences, and the present Directors will, to the best of their ability, conduct its affairs with the strictest impartiality, and with an eye only to the advancement of its true and legitimate purposes trusting that it will, for the future, enjoy the benefit of the zealous cooperation of all classes who wish well to Agriculture in our district.

The promoters of the Association regret to have to say that, for the past, their exertions have been much narrowed by the smallness of the funds placed at their disposal; and it is only by a more extensive support that they can expect, for the future, to render the Association more effective. It should be kept in view that in general the subscriptions of individual members have been of small amount, and it is therefore only by a large body of subscribers coming forward that sufficient funds for the carrying out of the objects of the  Association can be procured; and whilst it is earnestly hoped that the Association may derive and encouragement from all classes, it must not be forgotten that it is chiefly by the vigorous and cordial support of Practical Agriculturists themselves who are the parties most interested in its success and prosperity that; it can be maintained and strengthened. The Subscription - book will be found with GEO.M. SALMON, Esq., Writer, Falkirk the Treasurer of the Association, who will be glad to enter the Names of the Subscribers, to receive their Subscriptions and to afford all information required.

Falkirk, 1st February, 1848

 

Glasgow Herald  Monday 6th, 13th,17th, 20th ,24th,27 & 31st March, 3rd, 7th,10th April1848

Advertisements & Notices

LANDS AND MINERALS IN STIRLINGSHIRE F0R SALE

 To be Sold by Public Roup, within the Zetland Arms Inn, Falkirk, kept by Mr. Wallace, on Thursday the 13th day of April next, at One o'clock P.M., in virtue of the Powers of Sale contained in a Bond and Disposition in Security, ALL, and WHOLE that just and equal part and portion of the Commnonty and Common Muir of MUIRAVONSIDE, effeiring and corresponding to the Lands of Crownerland, conform to the valuation thereof, being valued at the sum of Seventy- - six Pounds, Fifteen Shillings and Foarpence Scots, called THATCHRIDGE, and Houses, Biggings, Yards, Parts, Pendicles, and Pertinents of the same whatsoever, consisting of Twenty- Two Acres of Arable Land and Six Acres of Moss, in the Parish of Muiravonside and County of Stirling, all as bounded and described in the Title Deeds thereof. The Lands are productive and pleasantly situated, and the Coals therein have been recently partially wrought, and, besides being of excellent quality command a ready market in Linlithgow, &c. &c., and the most ready means of conveyance thereof to Edinburgh and other places, by both Railway and Canal.

For further particulars, application may be made to Adam & Alexander Smith, writers, Falkirk, in whose hands may be seen the Titles of the Property and Articles of Roup.

Falkirk, 26th February, 1848.

 

Falkirk Herald 11th May 1848

BLACKBRAES COALS.

 THE BLACKBRAES DIAMOND, SPLTNT, and COXROD COALS may now be had at the Falkirk Station of the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway, at the following reduced prices, viz.: -

                                                                                               Per Cart of 14 Cwt.                                   Per Ton.

 Diamond Coal, of very superior quality,                           5s. 7d                                                        8s. Od. ,

Do. delivered in Falkirk and Grahamston,                        6s. 7d                                                         9s. Od.

Splint and Coxrod Coal,                                                        5s. 3d                                                         7s. 6d.

Do. delivered in Falkirk and Grahamston,                        6s. 3d                                                          8s. 6d.

Dross, very clean and good,                                                                                                                    3s. Od.

Do. delivered in Falkirk and Grahamston,                                                                                            4s. Od.

The Diamond Coal is a splendid Coal for room fires, where cleanliness, durability, and great heat are wished; and, for  the same reasons, it is admirably adapted for bakers' ovens,

Orders for these Coals, given to any of the town's carters, or left with Mrs. Maxwell, King's Court, or sent to the Coal Grieve at the Station, will meet with immediate attention.

 Tickets of weight and price always given along with the Coals.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday June 8th 1848

BLACKBRAES COALS.

THE BLACKBRAES DIAMOND, SPLTNT, and COXROD COALS may now be had at the Falkirk Station of the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway, at the following reduced prices, viz.: -

                                                                                               Per Cart of 14 Cwt.                                   Per Ton.

 Diamond Coal, of very superior quality,                           5s. 7d                                                        8s. Od. ,

Do. delivered in Falkirk and Grahamston,                        6s. 7d                                                         9s. Od.

Splint and Coxrod Coal,                                                        5s. 3d                                                         7s. 6d.

Do. delivered in Falkirk and Grahamston,                        6s. 3d                                                          8s. 6d.

Dross, very clean and good,                                                                                                                    3s. Od.

Do. delivered in Falkirk and Grahamston,                                                                                            4s. Od.

The Diamond Coal is a splendid Coal for room fires, where cleanliness, durability, and great heat are wished; and, for  the same reasons, it is admirably adapted for bakers' ovens,

Orders for these Coals, given to any of the town's carters, or left with Mrs. Maxwell, King's Court, or sent to the Coal Grieve at the Station, will meet with immediate attention.

 Tickets of weight and price always given along with the Coals.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 8th June 1848

EASTERN DISTRICT OF STIRLINGSHIRE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY'S SHOW.

The annual competition of Live Stock and Butter took place at Falkirk, on the lst curt. There was a good display of the celebrated Ayrshire stock. The judges - Mr. M'Kain, Lumloch; Mr. Thomas Bowman, Hallhill; and Mr Hay, Inchterf after mature deliberation, awarded the prizes as follow : -

For the best Cow, bought or bred - 1st, Mr. Forbes of Calendar; 2d, Mr Forbes.

For the best two Cows, out of one byre - 1st, Mr. Reid, Haming Valley; 2nd, Mr. Taylor, Broomage Mains. For the best Cow, bred-1st, Mr. Reid; 2nd, Mr. Robertson, Myrehead.

For the best two Cows, bred-1st, Mr. William Neilson, Greenwell; 2nd, Mr J. Stark, Wester Glen.

For the best Cow, bought or bred, with her last year's Calf - 1st, Mr Reid; 2nd, Mr. Rennie, Craigburn.

For the best three-year-old Quey, bought or bred - 1st, Mr. Rennie; 2nd, Mr. Robertson.

For the best two-year-old Quey in milk, bought or bred - 1st, Mr. Rennie; 2nd, Mr. J. Stark.

For the best two-year- old Quey in calf - 1st, Mr. Robertson; 2nd, Mr. Dobbie of Seamores.

For the best two- year-old Quey not in calf - 1st, Mr. Robertson; 2nd, Mr. Robertson; 3rd, Mr. Learmonth, Carmuirs.

For the best Bull of any age not exceeding five years 1st, Mr. James Jarvie, Greencraig; 2nd, Mr Reid.

For the best two-year-old Bull - 1st, Mr W. Neilson; 2nd, Mr. Bowie, Gilmeadowland; 3rd, Mr. Rennie. For the best one-year-old Bull - 1st, Mr Forbes; 2nd, Mr. Rennie.

For the best one-year-old Quey - 1st, Mr. J. Stark; 2nd, Mr. J. Stark; 3rd, Mr. Robertson.

For the best two year-old Quey - 1st, Mr. Rennie; 2nd, Mr. Forbes; 3rd, Mr. J. Stark.

Premiums competed for by Tenants whose rent does not exceed £100.

For the best Cow, bought or bred - 1st, Mr. Arthur, Pirleyhill; 2nd, Mr. Arthur.

For the best Cow, bred-1st, Mr. Taylor, Barleyside; 2nd, Mr. Arthur.

For the best two-year-old Quey in milk - 1st, Mr. J. Stark. For the best two-year-old Quey in calf - 1st, Mr. J. Jarvie; 2nd, Mr. W. Neilson.

For the best two-year-old Quey not in calf - 1st, Mr. J. StarK; 2nd, Mr. Arthur.

For the best one-year-old Quey - 1st, Mr. W. Wilson, North Broomage; 2nd, Mr. Allan, Tamfourhill.

For the best 3 lbs. Fresh Butter - 1st, Mr. J. Stark ; 2nd, Mr. Arthur; 3rd, Mr. Stirling of Muiravonside; 4th, Mr Reid.

For the best lot of Powdered Butter - 1st, Mr. Reid; 2nd, Mr. Arthur; 3rd, Mr. J. Stark; 4th, Mr. W. Neilson.

For the best Mare for agricultural purposes, foaled or in foal 1st, Mr. Forbes; 2nd, Mr. Rennie; 3rd, Mr. Learmonth.

For the best Mare for agricultural purposes, not in foal - 1st, Mr. Wilson, Nicolton; 2nd, Mr. Stark, Camelon; 3rd, Mr. Wilson.

For the best two-year-old Filly - 1st, Mr. Bowie; 2nd, Mr. Smith, Lochlands.

For the best year-old Filly - 1st, Mr. Bowie. For the best year-old Colt - 1st, Mr. Reid; 2nd, Mr. Taylor.

For the best Foal - 1st, Mr. Rennie,

For the best yearling Colt, for road or Field 1st, Mr. Robertson; 2nd, Mr. Gardner of Millquarter.

After the competition, a number of the members of the Association, along with the judges, repaired to the Zetland Arms Inn, where an excellent dinner awaited them. Charles Stirling, Esq. of Muiravonside, ably discharged the duties of the chair. In the course of the evening, the Chairman announced that Mr. Forbes would give his usual donation of 20 sovereigns for next year's show. Henry Salmon, Esq. of Bonnyside, acted as croupier.

 

Falkirk Herald June 8th 1848

TO MILL-WRIGHTS AND OTHERS.

WANTED, a THRASHING-MILL, of from 3 to 4 Horse Power. Parties having such to dispose of may hear of a purchaser by applying, by letter (post-paid), stating lowest price, to J. G. U., Vellore, by Linlithgow. June 7th, 1848.

 

Caledonian Mercury -Thursday 10th August, Perry’s Bankrupt Gazette, London Standard, Saturday 12th August, 2nd September 1848

SCOTCH SEQUESTRATIONS.

WADDELL James, farmer, grazier, and cattle dealer, Waulkmilton Parish, Muiravonside; 18th Aug. 8th Sept. one, Red Lion inn Falkirk. Claims by Feb. 8.

 

Falkirk Herald 9th November 1848

[To-morrow.]

SALE of DRAUGHT HORSES, MILCH COWS, CATTLE, SIXTEEN ACRES OF TURNIPS, POTATOES, FARM STOCKING, THRASHING MILL, HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE, &c.

At Waulkmilton, on Friday the 10th November. To be Sold by Public Roup, on Friday the 10th day of November, 1848, on the Farm of Waulkmilton, about 2 miles West of Linlithgow, possessed by Mr. James Waddell, The whole of the excellent Farm Stocking, Draught Horses, Milch Cows, Cattle, Turnips, Potatoes, Household Furniture, &c. on the above Farm, and which comprises

16 Acres of Turnips,

35 Bolls of Potatoes,

3 Draught Mares,

4 Six-quarter-old Queys,

2 Stots and a Bull,

1 Hay Waggon,

4 Close-bodied Carts, with Wheels and Axles,

2 Iron Ploughs,

A Thrashing Machine,

1 Pair of Hand Fanners,

1 Turnip Sowing Machine,

with the whole of the other Agricultural Implements and Utensils, Dairy Dishes, &c. &c.; also, the Household Furniture and Plenishing, - all of which will be Sold without any Reserve whatever, and Three Months' Credit given on Bills, or Discount for Cash.

Roup to begin at 11 o'clock forenoon exactly.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

 

Falkirk Herald 9th November 1848

EXTENSIVE SALE OF LARCH, SPRUCE, AND SCOTS FIR WOOD, On the Estate of Muiravonside, On Saturday the l&th November. To be Sold by Public Roup, on Saturday the 18th day of November, 1848, on the Estate of Muiravonside, belonging to Charles Stirling, Esquire, THREE LARGE PLANTATIONS of excellent FIR WOOD, which comprises Two Plantations at Drumbowie, containing upwards of Six Scots Acres of Growing LARCH, SPRUCE, and SCOTS FIR, averaging from 3 to 9 inches through, and numbering many thousand Trees. The above to be Sold in Two Lots. Likewise, at the same time will be Sold, at Castlehill, East of Drumbowie, on the same Estate, in Lots to suit purchasers, about TWELVE HUNDRED very fine heavy LARCH, SPRUCE, and SCOTS FIR TREES, averaging from 10 to 15 inches through, and which are remarkably hard grown, and cannot fail to give the utmost satisfaction to Purchasers. The usual Credit to be given on Bills, or Discount for Cash. Roup to begin with the two Plantations of Small Wood at Drumbowie, at 11 o'clock forenoon exactly, and to be continued with the Heavy Wood at the West end of Castlehill. The Lots may be seen any day previous to the Sale, by applying to James Bartholomew, at Muiravonside Tile-work. The Slamannan Railway and Union Canal pass through Muiravonside Estate, three miles West of Linlithgow and four miles South-east of Falkirk, and near to the Wood. JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer. 

 

Glasgow Herald Monday 27th November 1848

A TEACHER WANTED, for the SUBSCRIPTION SCH00l. at Avonbridge. who can Teach the statuaryBranches of Education. Examination of candidates to takeplace in the School Room. on Friday 1st Decemberat 11o'clock Forenoon.-For further particuars app to Mr.James Barker or Parker? wood merchant, Avonbridlge, by Airdrie.

Avonbridge. 22nd Nov., 1848.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 14th December 1848

SA LE 0F FAT CATTLE

At Muiravonside Offices, on Tuesday the 26th December.

 To be Sold by Public Roup, on Tuesday the 26th December, 1848, at Muiravonside Offices,

25 Very Fine Fat SHETLAND and LEWIS CATTLE, belonging to Charles Stirling, Esquire.

Roup to begin at Twelve o'clock noon exactly.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

1849

Falkirk Herald  Thursday 8th March, Stirling Observer  Thursday 8th March 1849

EASTERN DISTRICT OF STIRLINGSHIRE AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION'S SHOW.

 The Spring Show of this Association took place at Falkirk on Thursday the 1st current. The quantity of grain brought forward on this occasion was fully equal to former years. –

The following is a list of the premiums awarded: -

Seed Grain of Crop 1848, raised in the District.

For the best 4 qrs. of Barley, grown in the southern part of the district, 1 sovereign - Mr. Forbes of Callendar.

For the second best, 10s. - Mr. Gray of Windyyett.

For the best 4 qrs. of ditto, grown in the northern part of the district, 1 sovereign - Mr. Hardie, farmer, Bellsdyke.

For the second best, 10s. - Mr. Forbes.

For the best 4 qrs. of Short Oats, of the Potato or Flemish kind, grown in the southern part of the district, 1 sovereign- Mr. Forbes.

For the best 4 qrs of ditto, grown in the northern part of the district, 1 sovereign - Mr. Robertson, Myrehead.

For the second best, 10s. - Mr. Reid, Haining-valley.

For the best 4 qrs. of Long Oats, grown in the southern part of the district, 1 Sovereign - Mr. Forbes.

For the second best, 10s. - Mr. Rennie, Craigburn.

For the best 4 qrs. of ditto, grown in the northern part of the district, 1 sovereign - Mr. Forbes.

For the second best, 10s. Mr. Stark, Camelon.

For the best 4 qrs. of Beans, grown in the district, 1 sovereign - Mr. Johnston of Beancross.

For the best 2 qrs. of Perennial Ryegrass Seeds, grown in the southern part of the district, 10s. - Mr. Rennie. For the best 2 qrs. of ditto, grown in the northern part of the district, 10s. - Mr Stark.

FAT CATTLE.

For the best two Cattle, of weight, symmetry, and quality, for the flesher, 2 sovereigns - Mr. Robertson. For the second best two ditto, 1 sovereign - Mr. Reid.

For the best one, 10s - Mr. Learmonth, Carmuirs.

CHEESE.

For the best specimen of Full Milk Cheese, made by the Exhibitor within the district, in 1848, the quantity not being less than half a Cwt, 10s.- Mr Arthur, Pirleyhill.

For the second best ditto, provided the quantity shown be not less than a quarter Cwt. 5s. - Mr. Rennie. For the best specimen of Skimmed Milk ditto ditto, 10s. - M. Arthur.

For the second best ditto, 5s. - Mr. Rennie.

SALT BUTTER.

For the best Lot of Salt Butter, made by the Exhibitor within the district, 10s. - Mr. Rennie.

For the second best ditto, 5s. - Mr. Arthur.

After the Show, a number of the members of the Association dined in the Zetland Anns Inn, - Charles Stirling, Esq. of Muiravonside, in the chair; Henry Salmon, Esq. of Bonnyside, acted as croupier.

The judges were - Messrs Thomson, Inveravon; Hardie, Bo'ness Mains; and Shanks, Deans, Bathgate.

 

Falkirk Herald  Thursday 8th March 1849

OUP OF GRASS PARKS ON THE ESTATE OF MUIRAVONSIDE,

On Tuesday the 20th March. To be Let by Public Roup, on Tuesday the 20th March curt., THE GRASS PARKS on the Estate of Muiravonside, for Feeding and Grazing Cattle and Sheep, &c, comprising in all about 200 Acres of Old PASTURE GRASS, on the Lands of Wester Bowhouse and Drumbowie.

Credit till Martinmas on Bills.

Roup to begin at Wester Bowhouse, at Twelve o'clock noon.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

1st March, 1849.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 15th March 1849

PROPERTY AND INCOME TAX.

COUNTIES OF STIRLING, CLACKMANNAN, AND LINLITHGOW.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all Persons Assessed under the PROPERTY and INCOME TAX ACTS, that the Tax for the Year to 5th April, 1849, becomes due upon the 20th instant, and as peremptory instructions have been received to make an early collection for the current year, all parties liable are hereby required to make payment without the least delay. For the greater convenience of the public, the Collector will attend personally to receive payment, at the places and at the times Undermentioned; and it is particularly requested that parties will avail themselves of the opportunity thus afforded them of making payment in their respective Districts

At POLMONT, within Walker's Inn, upon SATURDAY the 31st day of March current, from 10 to half-past 12 o'Clock, for the parishes of Polmont and Muiravonside.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 15th, 22nd, 29th March, 15th November 1849

ADJOURNED SALE OF LANDS AND MINERALS IN STIRLINGSHIRE,

At a Greatly Reduced Upset Price.  To be Sold, by Public Roup, within the Zetland Arms Inn, Falkirk, kept by Mr. Wallace, on SATURDAY the 17th day of November next, at Twelve o'Clock Noon, in  virtue of the Powers of Sale contained in a Bond and Disposition in Security, ALL and WHOLE that just and equal part and portion of the Commonty and Common Muir of Muiravonside, effeiring and corresponding to the Lands of Crownerland, conform to the valuation thereof, being valued at the Sum of Seventy-six Pounds Fifteen Shillings and Fourpence Scots, called THATCHRIDGE, and Houses, Biggings, Yards,  Parts, Pendicles, and Pertinments of the same whatsoever, consisting, of Twenty-two Acres of ARABLE LAND and Six Acres of MOSS, - in the parish of Muiravonside and , county of Stirling, all as bounded and described in the Title deeds thereof. The Lands are productive and pleasantly situated, and the Coal therein has been recently partially wrought, and besides being of excellent quality, commands a ready market in Linlithgow, &c. &c, and the most ready means of conveyance thereof to Edinburgh and other places, by both Railway and Canal. For farther particulars, application may be made to Adam & Alexander Smith, Writers, Falkirk, in whose hands may be seen the Titles of the Property and Articles of Roup.

Falkirk, 18th October, 1849.

 

Stirling Observer - Thursday 22 March 1849

ASSESSED TAXES. –

COUNTY OF STIRLING, APPEAL COURTS.

THE COMMISSIONERS will meet at the places and days undermentioned, to hear and determine all Appeals against the Assessment of the current year : -

FOR DISTRICT OF FALKIRK, Comprehending Parishes of Airth, Bothkennar, Falkirk, Muiravonside, Larbert, Polmont, and Slamannan, in the Crown Inn, Falkirk, on THURSDAY the 5th April next, at Eleven o' Clock.

 

 

 

 

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 12th April 1849

EXTENSIVE SALE OF ELM, ASH, OAK, PLANE. BEECH, AND FIR WOOD,

ON THE ESTATE OF MUIRAVONSIDE,

On Saturday the, 28th April. To be Sold by Public Roup, on Saturday the 28th day of April, 1849, on the Estate of Muiravonside, belonging to Charles Stirling, Esq., 2141 HARDWOOD TREES, consisting of Elm, Ash, Oak, Plane, and Beech, varying in size from 4 to 12 inches through.

Also, 340 heavy LARCH and SCOTS FIR TREES, averaging from 10 to 15 inches through.

 The Hardwood comprises 72 lots, and the Firwood 36.

The whole to be Sold without Reserve.

Roup to begin at 12 o'clock noon precisely.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald  Thursday 12th April 1849

FALKIRK SCHOOLS –

 The English and Grammar Schools of this parish were examined by a committee of the Presbytery of Linlithgow, on the 20th ult. The examinators were : - Rev. Messrs Davidson of Slamanan, Ker of Polmont, M'Farlane of Muiravonside, Begg of Falkirk, Playfair of Abercorn, Holdom of Redding, Dickson of Grangemouth, and Oswald of Camelon. We observed the following among other influential individuals of the town and neighbourhood present, viz.: T. C. Hagart, Esq. of Bantaskine; Sheriff Grant; Provost Adam of Springbank; Henry Salmon, Esq. of Bonnyside; Rev. Paul Maclauchlan; John Wilson, Esq., surgeon, R.N.; John R. Reid, Esq., surgeon, R.N.; James Rennie, Esq., Gowan Bank; James Russel junior, Esq., banker ; James Girdwood, Esq., surgeon; Henry Aitken, Esq., writer. In addition to the above, there was a large and respectable attendance of the parents of the children, and others, who seemed to take a lively interest in the proceedings. The examinators expressed themselves highly delighted with the proficiency of the pupils, and passed a well-merited eulogium on the abilities and success of the teachers (Messrs Middleton and Burns), who are so well entitled to the countenance and support of the community. It is creditable to our community, that the clergymen of the various denominations of professing Christians into which it is divided, should thus meet, extend to each other the right hand of fellowship, and take part in an object which ought to be one of common interest to all, namely, the education of the people. It is to be regretted that the like liberality of feeling and enlightened views on this all-important subject do not more extensively prevail. Until the clergy of the innumerable sects which prevail throughout the country are brought to regard the school-room as a place in which all may meet, it is vain, we suspect, to look to any ministry for that greatest of all boons which any government could confer, a National Education.

 

Falkirk Herald  Thursday 10th May 1849

TWENTY-SEVEN FAT CATTLE TO BE SOLD AT MUIRAYONSIDE BYRES,

 On Tuesday the 22d May. To be Sold by Public Roup, on Tuesday the 22d May, 1849, at Muiravonside Byres, near Causewayend, belonging to C. Stirling, Esquire, 15 Prime Fat Heavy NORTH-COUNTRY STOTS, and 12 Prime Fat FOUR-YEAR-OLD QUEYS. –

The Cattle are thoroughly fed, and of extra-fine quality.

The usual Keep will be given to the Cattle.

Roup to begin at 12 o'clock noon.

 JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

 

 

 

 

Falkirk Herald  Thursday 10th May 1849

Accident to Mr Forbes, M.P. –

Mr. Forbes of Callendar, the respected member for the county, met with an accident on the 13th ultimo, whilst riding quietly along the turnpike road near to Avonbridge. His horse stumbled, and came down, falling upon its rider's leg, which was broken. He has since been confined; but the limb, we are glad to say, has been mending satisfactorily, and Mr. Forbes will shortly, it is to be hoped, be able to move about again. This accident, to a gentleman so widely known and so much respected, excited a sensation in the district, and his recovery from it is regarded as a public blessing.

Fatal Accident.-

 Upon Monday last, a man of the name of David Sharp, employed upon the inclined plane of Causewayend, on the Slamannan Railway, was bruised between some waggons which came in contact with each other, and died within a few hours after the accident. No blame is attachable to the company, or, we believe, to any of their officials.

Murder. –

The poor woman, Euphemia Bourhill, whose body was found in the Canal in October 1847, was lately exhumed for the purpose of recognition, in consequence of information given by a boy, implicating three boatmen upon the Union Canal. These men have been apprehended, and a thoroughly minute investigation is in progress of being made; but it is questionable whether the statement of the boy will be corroborated or strengthened. The men are still in custody; and if the statement of the boy turns out to be a fabrication, he ought to be visited almost with the punishment which he seeks to bring upon others.

Commissioners of Supply.-

We understand that this body, at a meeting lately held. have, resolved to station an additional policeman in the Falkirk District. This was much wanted, and is a step in the right direction.

 

Stirling Observer  Thursday 10th May 1849

APPREHENSION OF SUPPOSED MURDERERS.

 ( From the Witness.)

On the 2d of November, 1847, as we intimated at the time, the body of a female, apparently about fifty years of age, was found in the Union Canal, near to Causeyend, parish of Muiravonside. The body, which appeared to have been from ten to twenty days in the water, was dreadfully disfigured by numerous stabs and cuts, evidently inflicted with a large knife, or some similar instrument, and the head was also severed from the neck. As it was evident that the woman's death was caused by violent means, the matter underwent judicial investigation at the time; in the course of which it was discovered that the deceased, whose name was Euphemia Bourhill, belonged to Edinburgh, and that she was in the habit of travelling up and down the country making a livelihood by selling gingerbread, apples, and pears, at fairs and similar places. It was also ascertained that she had been last seen alive about midnight, on the 10th October, on her way home from Calder Fair, which she had attended in the pursuit of her vocation, and two or three miles from the Union Canal. When last seen alive, she was fully dressed, and had about 20s. in her possession, the proceeds of the sale of her wares at the fair. When, however, her body was found in the Canal, she was almost in a state of nudity, and her clothes were found at some little distance in the water. They appeared to have been torn from her person, and used for the purpose of wiping the blood from the instrument with which her death was caused. A reward of £50 was offered at the time for the discovery of the murderer; and a man, who was also an itinerant vender of gingerbread, was apprehended on suspicion, the woman having been last seen in his company, at a distance of twelve or thirteen miles from the place where her body was found. It singularly enough happened that this individual had marks of blood on his coat and other parts of his clothing, and a severe wound on his eye, and that he was also on his way home from Calder Fair. Nothing, however, having transpired beyond these circumstances - all which might have occurred at the fair, where fights ure of no rare occurrence - he was liberated, and the matter has been enveloped in mystery ever since. About ten or twelve days ago, however, information was, we understand, communicated to the authorities, that a young lad, employed in driving the horses attached to the Canal boats, had a knowledge of the guilty parties, and of the circumstances connected with the perpetration of the murder. He was immediately brought before the authorities; and, in consequence of the information he gave, two boatmen employed at the Canal were apprehended on Friday week - one at Linlithgow, and the other at Ratho - on suspicion. Their names are James Turnbull and Mungo Duff. Another boatman of the name of James Gray, who was suffering imprisonment at the time of these disclosures for another offence, is also said to be implicated. We have also heard that Turnbull was at large upon bail for an assault when he was apprehended. It is almost unnecessary to say, that various rumours are afloat as to the manner and place in which the murder was committed. Among others, we have heard that it took place at Hermiston, in the parish of Currie, and that the body was then conveyed in one of the Canal boats to Causeyend. We have also heard it stated that the parties have been remitted for trial.

 

Falkirk Herald, Stirling Observer Thursday 14 June 1849

EASTERN DISTRICT OF STIRLINGSHIRE AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION'S SHOW.

This show took place on Thursday the 7th inst., in a field near the Falkirk Station on the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway. The exhibition excited more than usual interest in consequence of an open competition being allowed for the first time by the Association for a considerable portion of the premiums, - an arrangement which has given general satisfaction, and will, it is confidently expected, extend the usefulness of the Association by its continuance on future occasions. The weather was fine, and the number of visitors greater than on former years. The judges of the Cattle were Mr. Robertson, Haughs, Paisley; Mr. Rennie, Corrie, Kilsyth, and Mr. Murdoch, Cornton, Glasgow; and of the Dairy Produce, Mr. Rankine, Rosehill; Mr. John Wyse and Mr. Thomas Miller, Falkirk. The judges gave the greatest satisfaction to all parties, and awarded the prizes as follows: -

FIRST DIVISION. Confined to Members in the District.

For the best Cow, bought or bred - 1st, Mr. Rennie, Craigburn; 2nd, Mr. Reid, Haining-valley.

For the best Cow, with her last year's Calf, bought or bred 1st and 2nd, Mr. Rennie.

For the best Cow, bred in the district - 1st, Mr. Reid; 2nd, Mr. Taylor, Broomage Mains.

For the best pair of Cows, bred in the district - 1st, Mr. Taylor; 2nd, Mr. Reid.

For the best bred animal of the Cow kind, bred by the Exhibitor and never out of his possession - 1st, Mr. Reid.

For the best Three-year-old Quey, bred in the district 1st, Mr. Rennie: 2nd, Miss Ann Taylor, Manuelburn-bridge.

For the best Two-year-old Quey, bred in the district, in milk, - 1st, Mr. Rennie; 2nd and 3rd, Mr. Reid.

For the best One-year-old Quey, bred in the district - 1st, Mr. Taylor; 2nd, Mr. Reid; 3rd, Mr. Forbes, of Callander.

For the best Bull, above two and under six years of age, bought or bred - 1st, Mr. Reid; 2nd, Mr. Rennie. For the best Two-year-old Bull - 1st, Mr. Rennie; 2nd, Mr. Robertson, Myrehead.

For the best One-year-old Bull 1st, Mr. Forbes; 2nd, Mr. Rennie.

For the best brood Mare, for Agricultural purposes, Foaled or in Foal - 1st, Mr. Robt. Bowie, Gilmeadowland 2nd, Mr. Robertson.

For the best Two-year old Filly - 1st, Mr. Thos. Taylor, Barleyside; 2nd, Mr. Rennie.

For the best One-year- old Filly - 1st, Mr. Forbes; 2nd, Mr, Bowie.

For the best One-year-old Colt 1st, Mr. Rennie. For the best Foal - 1st, Mr. Bowie; 2nd, Mr. Forbes.

For the best One-year-old Colt or Filly, for road or field - 1st, Mr. Robertson; 2nd, Mr. Reid. Competed for by Tenants under £100 Rent.

For the best Cow, bought or bred - 1st, Mr. Rintoul, Laurieston ; 2nd, Miss Anne Taylor.

For the best Three-year old Quey - 1st, Miss Anne Taylor; 2nd, Mr. Thos. Taylor.

For the best Two-year-old Quey, in Milk or in Calf - 1st and 2nd, Mr. Stark, Wester Glen.

SECOND DIVISION.

For the best 3 lbs. of Fresh Butter - 1st, Mr. Cuthel, Gilandersland; 2nd, Mr. Arthur, Pirleyhill; 3rd, Miss Anne Taylor; 4th, Mr. Binnie, Avonbank.

For the best 3lbs. of Powdered Butter - 1st, Mr. Gay, Polmonthill; 2nd, Mr. Arthur;3rd, Mr. Reid,4th, Mr. W. Neilson, Greenwells. THIRD DIVISION. For open Competition. For the best Milch Cow - 1st, Mr. John Anderson, Smithston, Cumbernauld; Mr. Rennie.

For the best Cow, bred by the Exhibitor - 1st, Mr. Rennie; 2nd, Mr. Taylor.

For the best pair of Milch Cows - 1st, Mr. Reid; 2nd, Mr. Rennie.

For the best Three-year-old Quey, in Milk - 1st, Mr. Taylor; 2nd, Mr. Rennie.

For the best Two-year-old Quey, in Milk - 1st, Mr. Rennie; 2nd, Mr. Reid.

For the best pair of Two-year-old Queys - 1st, Mr. Reid; 2nd, Mr. John Anderson.

For the best One-year-old Quey, bred by the Exhibitor - 1st, Mr. Taylor; 2nd, Mr. Anderson; 3rd, Mr. Reid.

For the best Bull, not exceeding Six years of Age - 1st, Mr. Alex. Muirhead, Willisfield by Denny ; 2nd, Mr. Reid.

For the best Two-year-old Bull - 1st, Mr. Reid; 2nd, Mr. John Anderson.

For the best One-year-old Bull - 1st, Mr. Rennie; 2nd, Mr. John Anderson.

For the best Mare, for Agricultural Purposes - 1st, Mr. Arch. M'Kerrow, Auchinsterry; 2nd, Mr. Alex. Battery, Monkland Iron and Steel Works.

For the best Two-year-old Filly - 1st, Mr. Thos. Taylor; 2nd, Mr. Anderson.

For the best Two-year-old Colt - 1st, Mr, Forbes; 2nd, Mr. Taylor.

For the best One-year-old Filly - 1st, Mr. M'Kain, Lumloch; 2nd, Mr. Forbes.

For the best One-year-old Colt - 1st, Mr. Rennie.

After the show a number of the members of the Society and their friends dined in the Zetland Arms Inn : - Charles Stirling. Esq. of Muiravonside, in the Chair; Colonel Forbes officiating as Croupier.

 

Stirling Observer  Thursday 2nd August 1849

MINISTERS' STIPENDS AND TEINDS IN SCOTLAND.

Gross Value                                       Ministers’                                          Unexhusted

of Teinds as                                      Stipend and                                       Teinds converted

existing in                                          Communion                                      to a Money Value

Victual or Money                             Elements as

                                                            Modified in

                                                            Victual or Money

Muiravonside, 

£320.4s.5d.                                       £231 4s. 8d.                                      £88.19s.9d.                       

 

Glasgow Herald Monday 20th August 1849

Advertisements & Notices

LANDS IN THE PARISH OF MUIRAVONSIDE, AND COUNTY OF STIRLING, FOR SALE.

To be Sold, by Private Bargain, in whole or in Lots, to suit intending Purchasers,

1. THE LANDS of BANKHEAD, with the SAWMILL, situated on the Property lying on each side of the Slamannan Railway, and within a quarter of a mile of the Glenellrig Station on that Railway. The Lands extend to about 50 Acres Imperial, and are at present Let for £60 yearly, and the Sawmill is Let to a separate Tenant at a rent of £10 yearly.  There is considerable planting on the Farm, and the Land would be easily drained and improved. The Superior has a reserved right to dig for Coal and Limestone; but beyond this, the Metals and Minerals belong to the Proprietor.

2. These parts belonging to the Monklands Railway Company, of the Lands of BRIDGEHILL, situated a little to the eastward of the Lands of Bankhend, as presently possessed by William Duncan, extending to about 24 Acres or thereby, Imperial. The present rental of the Lands is £35.  There is a QUARRY of the best Freestone in the Lands, which formerly Let at a rent of £30, or in the option of the Landlord, at lordship of Ten per Cent, on the output.

For further particulars application may be made to Mr. George Knight, Secretary to the Monklands Railway Company, 113 St. Vincent' Street; or Messrs. Mitchell, Allardice, and Mlitchell, 36 Miller Street, Glasgow, who are in possession of the Title Deeds.

Glasgow, 9th August, 1849.

              

Stirling Observer Thursday 25th, Newcastle Courant Friday 26th October 1849

COALFIELD IN STIRLINGSHIRE FOR SALE.

To be Sold, by Private Bargain,

THE CR AIGEND COALFIELD, as situated in the Parish of Muiravonside, near Falkirk and Linlithgow. The Coalfield extends to upwards of 400 acres, of various thick seams of coal, the first of which is only about six fathoms from the surface, and no pumping is required. Amongst other seams of fine quality, the field includes a very large extent of the celebrated Cox Road Coal, which is now so well known as a favourite coal in Edinburgh and elsewhere, and which commands a ready sale in any district. The Shieldhill Branch of the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway passes close to the mouth of the pits presently working, and from which there is not only a ready and direct communication with the district, but also by Railway and Canal with the cities of Edinburgh and Glasgow, Campsie, Scottish Central, and other Railways. The Bo'ness Short Railway is now in rapid progress, and, when completed, will afford a most extensive and ready shipment of the coal at Bo'ness, where there is an excellent and safe harbour for large vessels. The Engines and whole Machinery, together with the Colliers Houses, are in the very best order, and will either be Sold with the Minerals, or handed over to the purchaser at a valuation, and part of the price may remain on the security of the property. An investment so safe and encouraging as the above is seldom to be met with.

All farther particulars will be learned by applying to the Proprietor, at Craigend House, by Linlithgow.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 25th , Glasgow Herald Monday 29th October, Stirling Observer 1st,8th,15th November, 13th December 1849

ADJOURNED SALE LANDS AND MINERALS IN STIRLINGSHIRE,

At a Greatly Reduced Upset Price.

To be Sold, by Public Roup, within the Zetland Arms Inn, FALKIRK, kept by Mr. Wallace, on SATURDAY the 17th day of November next, at Twelve o'Clock Noon, in virtue of the Powers of Sale contained in a Bond and Disposition in Security.

ALL and WHOLE that just and equal part and portion of the Commonty and Common Muir of Muiravonside, effering and corresponding to the Lands of Crownerland, conform to the valuation thereof, being valued at the Sum of Seventy-six Pounds Fifteen Shillings and Fourpence Scots, called THATCHRIDGE, and Houses, Biggings, Yards, Parts, Pendicles, and Pertinments of the same whatsoever, consisting of Twenty-Two Acres of ARABLE LAND and Six Acres of Moss, - in the parish of Muiravonside and county of Stirling, all as bounded and described in the Title- deeds thereof. The Lands are Productive and Pleasantly situated, and the Coal therin has been recently partially wrought, and besides being of excellent quality, commands a ready market in Linlithgow, &c. &c., and the most  ready means of conveyance therof to Edinburgh and other places, by both Railway and Canal.

For farther particulars, application may be made to ADAM & ALEXANDER SMITH, Writers, Falkirk in whose hands may be seen the titles of the Property and Articles of Roup.

Falkirk, 18th October, 1849

1850's

1850

 

Caledonian Mercury  Thursday 17th January 1850

Advertisements & Notices

IMPORTANT INTIMATION.

CHEAP COAL, 2s. OF A REDUCTION.

THE MUIRAVONSIDE COLLIERY COMPANY beg to inform the Inhabitants of Edinburgh, that they are still Selling at the REDUCEDPRICES, although there has been a general rise at all the Coal Depots in Town. This Company's Coal will be found of a very superior quality. It is large, durable, gives a strong heat, and is very clean, producing nothing but a little heavy brown ash. In short, the great increasing, demand is a sufficient guarantee that this Coal is giving general satisfaction. Reduced Prices:-

 Jewel ...............9s. 0d. per Ton.

Diamond......... .8s. 6d. per Ton.

 Household ......8s. 0d. per Ton.

Cartage additional 1s, within Tolls.

All Orders must be addressed MUIRAVONSIDE COLLIERY COMPANY, Main Entrance, Port Hopetoun, Union Canal.

 

Glasgow Herald  Friday 15th,22nd,29th, Stirling Observer 21st,28th,  March 1850

Advertisements & Notices

LANDS IN THE PARISH OF MUIRAVONSIDE AND COUNTY OF STIRLING, FOR SALE.

There will be Sold, by Public Roup, within the Royal Exchange Sale Rooms, Glasgow, upon Wednesday the 3d day of April, 1850, at Two o'clock P.M.

 1. THE LANDS of NORTH BANKHEAD, with the SAW-MILL and WATER-POWER, lying on each side of the Monkland Railways, and distant one mile or thereby from Avonbridge Station, as the same are at present possessed by Thomas Forrest and James Gardner respectively.  The Lands are at present Let for £60 yearly, and the Saw-Mill at an annual rent of £10. There is a considerable extent of the Lands planted with Trees of from 30 to 50 years standing. The Lands and Plantations extend to about 65 Acres, 2 Roods and 13 Poles, Imperial. 

2. The LANDS of BRIDGEHILL, situated a little to the Eastward of the Lands of North Bankhead, as presently possessed by William Duncan, extending, with Plantation and Quarry, to about 27 Acres and 30 Poles Imperial. The present Rental is £35. There is a Freestone Quarry in the Lands, which formerly Let at a Rent of £30. To ensure a Sale, the Lands of NORTH BANKHEAD, &c. will be put up at £1500; and the Lands of BRIDGEHILL, &c., at £900.

The LANDS of FOGGERMOUNTAIN, containing 50 acres, or thereby, with the FARM STEADING, &c., are also for Sale. These Lands adjoin the Lands of Bridgehill, and are in the immediate vicinity of Avonbridge. For further particulars application may be made to Mr. George Knight, 113 St. Vinscent Street; or to Messrs. Mitchell, Allardice, & Mitchell, 36 Miller Street, with whom are the Title Deeds and Articles of Roup.

Glasgow, 12th March, 1850

 

Glasgow Herald Monday 22nd April 1850

COAL FIELD IN STIRLINGSHIRE FOR SALE.

TO BE SOLD, BY PRIVATE BARGAIN,

 THE CRAIGEND COAL FIELD, as situated in the Parish of Muiravonside, near Falkirk and Linlithgow. The Coal Field extends to upwards of 400 acres of various thick Seams of  Coal, the first of which is only about six fathoms from the Surface, and no pumping is required. Amongst other seams of fine quality, the Field includes a large extent of the celebrated Cox Road Coal which is now so well known as a favourite Coal in Edinburgh and elsewhere, and which always commands a ready sale in any district. The Shield Hill Branch of the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway passes close to the mouth of the Pits presently working, and from which there is not only a ready and direct communication with the district, but also (both by Railway and Canal) with the  Cities of Edinburgh and Glasgow, Campsie, Scottish Central, and other Railways. The Bo’ness Short Railway is now in rapid progress, and when completed, will afford a most extensive and ready shipment of the Coal at Bo'ness, where there is an excellent safe Harbour for large vessels. The Engines and whole Machinery, together with the Colliers Houses, are in the very best order, and will either be Sold with the Minerals, or handed over to the purchaser at a valuation. A part of the price may remain in security of the Property.

An investment so safe and encouraging as the above is seldom to be met with.

All further particulars may be learned by applying to Mr. G Geddes, Mining Engineer, 49 Albany Street, Edinburgh.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 25th April, 2nd, 9th May 1850

BY ADJOURNMENT.

FOR SALE, LONG LEASE OF SUBJECTS IN MUIRAVONSIDE.

There will be exposed to Sale, by Public Roup, within the Office of Adam Smith, Writer, in Wilson's Buildings, South side High Street, Falkirk, on FRIDAY the 10th day of May next, at 'Twelve o'Clock Noon, - A TACK of, and the Leasehold Right and Property in, All and Whole that ANGLE of GROUND of TARDUFF MUIR, bounded by a part of said Muir on the West, by the road leading to Linlithgow Bridge on the South, and by another road on the East and North parts, as particularly mentioned in the Tack or Titles thereof: together with the DWELLING-HOUSES and BUILDINGS thereon, excepting the piece of said Ground subset or assigned to, or lately occupied by John Duncan, but with right of relief from a part of the Tack-duty effeiring to such excepted ground. The above Subjects, the present tenant of which is Andrew Bartholomew, are held upon a Lease for 999 years, current from Whitsunday 1838, and the Houses and Buildings are nearly new. The Vacant Ground might be most advantageously built on, or Subset or Assigned.

For particulars, apply to Adam Smith, Writer, Falkirk, who will exhibit the Titles and Articles of Roup. Falkirk, 25th March, 1850.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 8th August 1850

OATS, BARLEY, LINT, AND POTATOES,  AT STRATHAVON, On Saturday the 17th August. TO be Sold by Public Roup, on Saturday the 17th day of August, 1850, on the Farm of Strathavon, about one mile east of Avonbridge, possessed by Mr, Wm. Waugh, the whole Growing Crop and Hay on the above Farm, coinprising -  25 Acres of OATS, 9 Acres of LINT, 2 Acres of BARLEY, 3 Acres of PRINCE REGENT and AMERICAN EARLY POTATOES, ready for lifting, and 1000 Stones of RYEGRASS and CLOVER HAY, in ricks. The Crops are extra fine - indeed first-rate - and very early, and will be Sold in Lots without reserve.

Four Months' Credit on Bills, or Discount for Cash.

Roup to begin at 12 o'clock noon. JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 26th September 1850

STIRLING CIRCUIT COURT OF JUSTICIARY.

 The Autumn Circuit Court of Justiciary was opened here yesterday morning, at ten o'clock, by the Right Hon. the Lord Justice-Clerk, and the Hon. Lord Wood. E. F. Maitland, Esq., Advocate-Depute ; James Aitken, Esq., Clerk.

5th Case.

 Alexander M'Kenzie, charged with the theft of a hen from a farm in the parish of Muiravonside, aggravated by his having been five times previously convicted of theft, pleaded not guilty. After the examination of witnesses, Lord Wood summed up the evidence, and the jury found the panel guilty as libelled. He was sentenced to transportation for seven years.

 

Falkirk Herald, Stirling Observer, Thursday October 10th 1850

THE FARM OF GLENHEAD TO LET, ON A LEASE OF 19 YEARS.

TO be Let, on a Lease of 19 years, the FARM of GLENHEAD, upon the estate of Craigend. in the parish of Muiravonside, belonging to W. C. Learmonth McKenzie. Esq., and which extends to 96 Acres, or thereby, imperial measure, besides 30 Acres of Moss, &c. . The Farm has been occupied by the Proprietor for the last four years past, and is now all thoroughly drained in every furrow, I6 feet apart, over the whole of the Arable Land. A considerable Division is in Grass, and has been laid down in the best condition. The greater part of the Farm is of a dark deep loamy Dryfield soil, and well adapted for raising Potatoes and Turnips; and the other portion of the Farm is well suited for growing Wheat, Beans, and Oats. There is an excellent new and most respectable FARM STEADING, with OFFICES complete, built upon the Farm within the last two years.

 For farther particulars, apply at Craigend House, where written offers will be received for the Farm up to the 20th October current.

Craigend House, 5th October, 1850.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 14th November 1850

TWENTY CORN STACKS, MILCH COWS, FAMOUS DRAUGHT MARES, AND THE WHOLE FARM STOCKING, At Drumtassie, on Saturday, 23d November. To be Sold by Public Roup, on Saturday the 23d day of November, 1850, on the Farm of Drumtassie, one mile south from Avonbridge, possessed by Mr. John Yetts, THE whole CROP, HORSES, MILCH COWS, CATTLE, and FARMING IMPLEMENTS, &c. &c, on the above Farm, comprising -  20 Stacks of Oats, 500 Stones of Ryegrass Hay in Ricks, 1 Stack of Ryegrass seed Hay, 2 Ricks of Meadow Hay, 1 Stack of Oat Straw, 1 Rare five-year-old Draught Mare, 1 Draught Brood Mare in foal, 1 Capital Horse Foal, 3 Ayrshire Milch Cows, in calf, 4 Ayrshire Milch Cows, farrow, 3 Three-year-old Ayrshire Queys, in calf, 3 Six-quarter-old Queys, 4 Calves, 1 Fat Cow, 1 Fat Sow, 1 Acre of Yellow Turnips, 20 Bolls of Potatoes, 2 Close-bodied Carts, with Wheels and Axles, 1 Iron Plough, by Gray of Uddingston, 2 Pair of Harrows, 1 Wooden Land Roller, 2 Sets of Cart and Plough Horse Harness, 1 Pair of Hand Fanners, and the whole of the small Farming Implements, Barn Utensils, Dairy Dishes, &c. &c. &c, all of which will be Sold without reserve, as the Exposer is leaving the Farm.

Three Months' Credit on Bills or Discount for Cash.

Roup to begin at Eleven o'clock forenoon. JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Glasgow Herald  Friday 15th & 29th November 1850

Advertisements & Notices

MONKLAND RAILWAYS

(DEVIATION OF SLAMANNAN AND BORROWSTOUNESS RAILWAY; EXTENSION OF TIME; AND AMENDMENT OF ACTS.) BILL

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN.

That application is intended to be made to Parliament, in next Session, for leave to bring in a Bill for the purposes following, or some of them, that is to say, to empower the Monkland Railways Company to deviate from and  Alter the Lines and Levels of the Railway and Branch Railway  authorized by "The Slamannan and Borrowstouness Railway  Act, 1840," between the points following, viz. :--As regards the main line of Railway, authorized by the said Act, from the point  at or near Causwayend, in the Parish of Muiravonside and County of Stirling, and near the Northern Terminus of the Slamannan Railway which is described in the said Act as the point of commencement of the said main line, to a point near the east side of Kinneil Iron Works, in the Parish of Borrowstouness and County of Linlithgow; and as regards the said Branch Railway, front the point in the said Parish of Muiravonside, at or near which the said main line will Cross the occupation road, leading eastward from Myrehead to the Parish Road to a point in the said last mentioned Parish, near Myrehead, where the said Branch Railway will join the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway; and to make and maintain all proper works and conveniences in connection with the said deviations, and to take powers for the compulsory purchase of Lands, Houses, and other Property, for the purposes, of such deviations and other works; which intended deviations and works are or will be situate in, or will pass from, through, or into, the Parish of Muiravonside, in the County of Stirling, and the Parish of Borrowstouness, in the County of Linlithgow.  And Notice is further given, that duplicate Plans and Sections, describing this Lines, Situation, and Levels of the said intended Works, and the Lands, Houses, and other Property- in the Line of the said Works, or within the limits of deviation as defined on the said Plans, or which may, be required to be taken for the purposes of such Works, together with Books of Reference to such Plans, containing the names of the Owners or reputed Owners, Lessees or reputed Lessees, and Occupiers of such Lands, Houses, and Property, and a Published Map, to a scale of not less than half an inch to a mile, with the Lines of the proposed Works delineated thereon, so as to show their general course and direction, and a copy of this Notice, as published in the Edinburgh Gazette, will, on or before the thirtieth day of November current, be deposited for Public  inspection in the Office, at Stirling, of the principal Sheriff Clerk of the County of Stirling, and in the Office, at Falkirk, of the principal Sheriff Clerk for the Eastern District or Division of the said County of Stirling, and in the Office, at Linlithgow, of the principal Sheriff Clerk of the County of Linlithgow; and that a copy of so much of  the said Plans, Sections, and Books of Reference, as relates to each of the said Parishes, and a Copy of this Notice, will also, on or before the thirtieth day of November current, be deposited, for Public inspection, with the Schoolmaster, or, if there be no Schoolmaster, then with the Session Clerk, of each of the said Parishes, at the usual place of abode of each such Schoolmaster or Session Clerk. And Notice is further given, that it is intended by the said Bill to take power to deviate in the construction of the Works before set forth from the Lines delineated on the said Plans, intended to be deposited as aforesaid, to such an extent as will be defined on the said Plans, and also to cross, alter, and divert such Highways, Turnpikes and other Roads, Railways, Bridges, Streets, Paths, Passages, Rivers, Canals, Brooks, Streams, Sewers, Waters, and Water Courses,, as it may be necessary or expedient to cross, alter, or divert, for the purpose of making, maintaining, and using the Works before set forth, or any portion thereof, or any of the conveniences connected therewith. And Notice is further given, that it is intended by the said Bill to vary and extinguish all existing rights and privileges connected  with the Lands, Houses, and other Property, to be purchased as, before said, or which would in any manner impede or interfere with the construction of the Works before set forth, or any of them,  or with the maintenance or use thereof, and to confer other rights and privileges; and also, to take Powers to the Monkland Railways Company to levy Tolls, Rates, and Duties, on or for the use of the said intended Works, and to confer, vary, or extinguish exceptions from payment of Tolls, Rates, and Duties. And Notice is further given, that it is intended by the said Bill to extend the time granted by the said recited Act, for the compulsory purchase of Lands, Houses, and other Property, and the completion of the Works thereby authorized. And Notice is further given, that it is intended by the said Bill to empower the Monkland Railways Company and the Magistrates and Town Council of the Royal Burgh of Linlithgow, to enter into agreements with each other in regard to any Customs, Rates, Tolls or Duties, leviable -by the said Magistrates, or Magistrates and Town Council, in respect of any traffic upon the lines of Railway authorised by the said recited Act, or to be authorised by the said Bill, or in regard to the commutation, or the purchase or lease, by the said Monkland Railways Company, of such Customs, Rates, Tolls, or Duties. And Notice is further given, that it is intended by the said Bill to vary or extinguish all such rights and privileges as may in any manner interfere with the objects aforesaid, or any of them. And Notice is further given, that, for the above and other purposes, it is intended by the said Bill to alter and amend the said recited Act, and "The Monkland Railways Act, 1848," and, so far as necessary, the several Acts therein recited.

MITCHELL, ALLARDICE, & MITCHELL, Glasgow.

GRAHAME, WEEMS, & GRAHAME, Westminster.

Glasgow, 9th November, 1850.

 

 

1851

 

Dundee,Perth and Cupar Advertiser Tuesday 21st ; Aberdeen Journal Wednesday 22nd January 1851

APPLICATIONS FOR CESSIO BONORUM.

William Gentleman, cattle dealer, residing at Bulliondale, near Avonbridge — to be examined in Sheriff's Office, Falkirk, 24th February, at twelve o'clock.

 

Elgin Courier Friday 24th January 1851

APPLICATIONS FOR CESSIO BONORUM.

Wm. Gentleman, cattle-dealer, residing at Bulliondale near Avonbridge, present prisoner in the jail of Stirling.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 13th February 1851

The following cases at the instance of the Procurator-Fiscal, were disposed of summarily before Mr. Sheriff Robertson, on Monday last:-

 1, Charles Boyle and John Gallacher, boatmen on the Union Canal, and belonging to Edinburgh, were charged with having, on the night of the 4th curt., stolen two bushels of potatoes from a potato-pit on the farm of Gilandersland, in the parish of Muiravonside. The accused pled not guilty, but after evidence was led, they were found guilty, and sentenced to 40 days' imprisonment each. The potatoes were traced to the prisoners, and found concealed in the boat under their charge, then lying in Causeyend Basin.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 20th February 1851

SHERIFF-COURT.- The following cases, at the instance of Mr. Gair, Procurator.-Fiscal, were disposed of at Stirling, on Monday last, before Mr. Sheriff Robertson and a Jury.

2. James Binnie, a labourer, from Middierigg, in the parish of Muiravonside, was accused of breaking into the house of George Thomson, a broker in Falkirk, on the night of the 17th of January last, and stealing a quantity of wearing apparel. The charge was aggravated by three previous convictions. He pleaded guilty, and was sentenced to eight months' imprisonment.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 13th March 1851

BIRTHS.

At Muiravonside Manse, on the 5th instant, Mrs. McFARLAN, of a daughter.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 13th March 1851

THE MONKLANDS RAILWAY COMPANY AND THE EDINBURGH AND GLASGOW RAILWAY COMPANY. –

The Monklands Railway Company have for some time past been engaged in the construction of a passage for their Bo'ness branch, beneath the Edinburgh and Glasgow line, in the parish of Muiravonside, and about a mile and a-half on this side of Linlithgow. The roof of this tunnel consists of timber supported from below by piles. Such a construction, which of course is to be only temporary, could not but be endangered by the rapid passage along it of heavy trains. The Monklands Company accordingly made application on Friday last to the Second Division of the Court of Session to interdict the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway Company from running their trains at a rate of more than five miles an hour over the tunnel. The complainers alleged that the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway run some of their trains at the rate of from twenty-five to thirty miles an hour over the site of the works, to the hazard of the lives of the parties in the trains, as well as to the danger of the works and the workmen employed at them. The Edinburgh and Glasgow alleged that the complainers had entered upon their grounds without legal warrant or legitimate authority ; that the Monkland Company had erected posts and given signals which they had no right to do; and that the opinions of Mr. Stevenson, C.E., who had been consulted in the case, as to the rate of speed that should be followed, were in no way binding upon the respondents. After hearing counsel both for and against the granting of the interdict, their Lordships pronounced the following interlocutor - The Lords having considered the note of suspension and interdict, and the report of the Lord Ordinary (Dundrennan), and having heard counsel, grant the interdict ad interim as craved, prohibiting the respondents from passing their engines or trains across the site of the complainers' works referred to, at a rate exceeding five miles an hour, or exceeding such other rate as shall be fixed by Mr. Stevenson, as the works of the complainers shall proceed, at their highest peril, and remit to the Lord Ordinary to pronounce such other orders as the circumstances may require in the progress of the works ; and direct Mr. Stevenson to inspect the operations and the speed at which the trains of respondents pass over the works, and report to the Lord Ordinary on the bills; and instruct the Lord Ordinary not to pass the note till the meeting of the Court in May, and then to report the case to the Court."

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 13th March 1851

MUIRAVONSIDE GRASS PARKS, On TUESDAY the 18th MARCH. To be Let by Public Roup, on Tuesday the 18th day of March, 1851, THE GRASS PARKS on the ESTATE of MUIRAVONSIDE, belonging to Charles Stirling, Esq., for grazing and feeding Cattle and Sheep, viz.: - THE GRASS PARKS AT DRUMBOWIE, THE CRASS PARKS AT CASTLEHILL, and THE GRASS PARKS AT SEATREES. The above comprise upwards of 20 different fields of various sizes, 4 of which are Young Grass. The fields are all well Fenced and Watered. Also, at the same time will be Sold, immediately after the Roup of the Parks, belonging to the said Proprietor, about 1400 Stones of RYEGRASS and CLOVER HAY, in Three Ricks. The whole to be Let and Sold on the usual terms. Roup to begin with the Drumbowie Parks, at 12 o'clock noon. JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 27th March 1851

SHERRIFF CRIMINAL TRIALS. On Monday last, the 24th curt., the following criminal cases were tried at Stirling before the Sheriff and a Jury : -

At the instance of John Gair, Esq.

6. Peter O'Hara pleaded not guilty to a charge of the theft of 4s. 10d. from the person of John Roy, farmer, Muiravonside, in the Kirk Wynd of Falkirk, on the 30th day of January last. Witnesses were examined, and the jury found O'Hara guilty.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 27th March, 3rd , 10th April 1851

TO BE SOLD OR LET, A WRIGHT'S and SMITH'S SHOP at Avonbridge, by Airdrie, with the GOOD-WILL of the BUSINESS, and a complete assortment of TOOLS; also, a DWELLING-HOUSE, with Three Rooms, Kitchen, Closet, &c. The Premises are in excellent order, and the locality - within a short distance of the Slamannan Railway - is a good one for business. Entry to be had at Whitsunday first, as the Proprietor is leaving the place, having embarked in another business.

 Apply to Mr. James Gardner,  Avonbridge.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 3rd April 1851

Summary Cases. –

The following cases, at the instance of the Procurator-Fiscal, were tried before Mr. Sheriff Robertson on Monday last: - . 1. Andrew Dunsmore, charged with committing a theft at Avonbridge, in the parish of Muiravonside, aggravated by a previous conviction. He denied the charge, but on evidence being led, the Sheriff found him guilty, and sentenced him to 40 days' imprisonment.

 

Stirling Observer, Falkirk Herald, Thursday 17 April 1851

SHERRIFF CRIMINAL TRIALS.

Preparatory to the Circuit Court of Justiciary, which opens here this day the following cases were tried, on Monday last, before the Sheriff and a Jury:-

At the instance of JOHN GAIR, Esq.

4. Edward Herbert pleaded guilty to stealing two pairs of trousers from a dwelling-house at Wester-Bows, parish of Muiravonside. Four previous convictions being proved against the prisoner, he was sentenced to nine months' imprisonment.

Agent - Mr. Alex. Monteath.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 8th May 1851

New Horse and Cattle Fair at Slamannan.-

 At a large and influential meeting of farmers and others held at Slamannan in March last, it was resolved that two markets or fairs be held annually at that place for the sale of horses and cattle, in May and November. The first fair was, accordingly, held on Tuesday last. The stock began to arrive at a pretty early hour, and by ten o'clock almost all the beasts had taken their ground. The village presented a very animated appearance, and the turn out of dealers and stock promises fair to establish the Slamannan market. In addition to a large number of buyers and sellers from the neighbourhood, some dealers were present from Strathaven and Perth. The number of beasts was much larger than had been expected, upwards of 100 head of cattle being on the ground. They were, for the most part, small, and none of them brought very high prices. The following are some of the prices realised for this description of stock :- Two of the best cows in the market were shown by Mr. Waddell of Rachiehill, and the price asked for them was something under £20. They were sold pretty early in the day. Mr. Bryce of Bogside sold a farrow cow to Mr. Reid, Haining Valley, for £6 10s. Another cow was sold by Mr. John Arthur, Balcastle, to a dealer from Bellshill, for £5 10s. Another farrow cow was sold by David Stark, Greenhill, to Mr. James Graham, Myothill, for £6 10s. Three queys were sold to Mr. John Gentleman of Avonbridge by Mr. John Downs, Slamannan, for £9 10s. The same gentleman sold a quey to Mr. Rennie, Tippetcraig, at £4. Mr. Speirs, Rigend, sold three queys to Mr. W. Brown of Drumshantie at £7. Mr. Scott of Binniehill sold two queys at £7 to Mr. Leishman, Camelon; also, a two-year-old bull at £2 15s. to the same gentleman. Mr. Russell, Parkhead, sold a cow to Mr. Graham, a dealer from Perth, for £7 12s. 6d.; and Mr. Graham also purchased twelve milch cows at about £7 10s. a-head. There was also a very fair show of horses, which were very much superior in breeding and condition to the cattle present. They were principally farm horses, but a few good saddle horses were also shown. For this sort of stock there was a pretty good demand, but the high prices asked by dealers prevented many sales from being effected. Good farm horses averaged from £20 to £35, and inferior animals £16 to £20. Mr. A. Smith, Falkirk, bought a very superior mare at £40 or guineas. Mr. John Shanks, Blackriggs, sold a farm mare to Mr. Murphy, Grahamston, at £30. Mr. Brown, Middlerigg, sold a horse to a Glasgow dealer at £20. Mr. John Downs, Slamannan, sold a horse to a dealer from Glasgow for £40. A superior three-year-old stallion was shown by Mr. Bowie, Gillmeadowland, which was very much admired; and a horse, the property of Mr. Alexander Binnie, Craigend Colliery, which was shown at Linlithgow, and for which a high price was offered, was particularly inquired after, but the horse being in a different part of the country was not shown at the fair. A considerable quantity of the stock remained unsold, especially horses, for which buyers were unwilling to give the high prices asked. The establishment of this fair at Slamannan cannot fail to be very beneficial to the village and country round, in encouraging the breeding and rearing of cattle. We are sure had there been a larger supply of large and well conditioned cows, they could not have failed to bring remunerating prices. There was a considerable number of visitors and pleasure-seekers from the country, but though a good many showed signs of being "top-heavy," the utmost decorum was observed during the day. Nearly the whole of the stock had left the ground by four o'clock, but the most of the country people seemed disposed to stay and entertain themselves after the business of the day. On the whole we cannot but congratulate the farmers and agriculturists connected with the country round Slamannan, on the very promising commencement of their markets, and we trust they will combine to support the fair so well begun.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 15th May 1851

SUMMARY CASES. –

 The following cases, at the instance of the Procurator-Fiscal, have been disposed of before Mr. Sheriff Robertson during the past week :-

 1. Margaret Crombie or Brown, charged with theft at Middlerig, in the parish of Muiravonside, pleaded not guilty, but on evidence being adduced, the Sheriff found her guilty, and sentenced her to 60 days' imprisonment.

CARTS & WHEELS, WOOD, IRON, SMITHS' & WRIGHTS' TOOLS, HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE, &c. &c,

At AVONBRIDGE, on 17th May. To be Sold by Public Roup, on Saturday the 17th day of May, 1851, THE Whole Stock of IRON, CUT WOOD, SMITHS' and WRIGHTS' TOOLS, NEW FURNITURE, CARTS and WHEELS, and other EFFECTS, belonging to Mr James Gardner, Wood and Iron Merchant, &c., Avonbridge, who is removing to Kirkintilloch, and which comprises - 2 CARTS, WITH WHEELS AND AXLES, 60 Gangs of Spokes and Treads for Cart Wheels, and a great quantity of Cut Wood in Deals and Planks, Slots, &c.; 1 pair of Smiths' Bellows, 2 Anvils, a Vice, a Cast-iron Plate for ringing Cart Wheels, and Iron Block for bending Rings; also small Working Tools, such as Dies and Tops, Screw Plates, Hammers, Cresses, Mandrils, Tongs, &c.; together with a great quantity of Wrights' Tools, 18 New Chairs, and 4 Tables.

3 Tons of BAR IRON, of various sizes.

6 Tons of SCRAP IRON, and an immense variety of other Articles and Effects.

Likewise, about 500 Stones excellent RYE-GRASS HAY.

Three months' Credit on Bills.

Roup to begin at Eleven o'clock forenoon.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

Falkirk, 8th May, 1851.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 22nd  May 1851

May Fair. –

This large horse and cattle fair was held here last Thursday, on the Callendar Riggs. There was a very fair turn out of stock, and a considerable number of dealers were present. The cattle fair was held first, of which description of stock there were about 300 on the ground. They were generally very good animals, and there were a few first-rate beasts. Notwithstanding the dealers' complaint that the market was rather dull, a great proportion of the stock changed hands, and a comparatively small number were driven off as unsold. There was a fair attendance of dealers from the south, who made very considerable purchases. We subjoin a few quotations of prices realised. Mr. Leishman, Camelon, sold a quey to a south country dealer for £7 10s. Mr. Wyse, Bainsford, also sold a quey to a southern dealer for £6 10s. Mr. Laurie, Camelon, sold seven milk cows to southern dealers at prices ranging from £6 to £8. Mr. Dingwall, Redding, sold a three-year-old quey to Mr. Gentleman, Avonbridge, for £4 10s. Mr. Learmonth, Laurieston, sold a quey to Mr. Robertson, Maddiston, for £5. Mr. Reid, Haining Valley, sold a milk cow to Mr. Young, Bormie, at £10 or guineas. Mr. James Graham, Myothill. sold a lot of sixteen milch cows, at prices ranging from £7 to £11, to south country dealers. Mr. Graham also sold a lot of fat stots at ten guineas each to Mr. Muirhead, Grahamston; also a lot of lean stots to Mr. Morrison, Grangemouth, at £6 10s. each. Mr. Neilson, Greenwells, sold two queys at £7 10s to Mr. Graham. Perth. Mr. John Allan, Carmuirs, sold two stots at £5 10s. to Mr. Wm. Cuthell. Shieldhill. Mr. Cuthell also sold a cow at £7 to a southern dealer. Mr. John Brown, Denny, sold two cows at £1 each to south country dealers. Mr. Donaldson, Pendershill, sold a milch cow to a southern dealer at £6 15s. Mr. Ronald, Carronvale, sold two queys to Mr. Bauchop of Drum, at £7, and one to an Edinburgh dealer at 7 guineas. Mr. G. Hamilton. Muiravonside, sold a milch cow to a southern dealer at £7. Mr. Aitken, Avonbridge, sold a lot of 7 cows at prices ranging from £5 to £7 10s.; he also bought 3 cows at prices from £5 10s. to £7 10s. A south country dealer, whose name we could not learn, sold a lot of 5 milk cows at from £6 to £9 each. Mr. Ronald, Carronvale, sold a cow at £7 to a person from Grangemouth. Mr. Liddell, Denny, sold one cow at £11 - probably the best in the market. Mr. George Cuthill. Lochcote. bought a lot of two-year old stots from Mr. Graham at 4 guineas each. The horse market was not nearly so brisk as the cattle, though the show was very good, there being about 90 in the market - some of them very superior. Prices for good draught horses were about £25 to £32, and inferior animals brought prices varying from £15 to £20. Saddle and harness ponies were from £8 to £12, and good riding horses from £20 to £30. We quote one or two prices. Mr. Main, Hill, sold a young work-horse at £19. Mr. Shanks, Headswood, sold a three-year-old colt at £22. Mr. Murphy, Grahamston, sold a good draught horse to Messrs Aitken, brewers, for £31. A comparatively small number of horses changed hands, and a great number remained unsold; the supply being evidently much greater than the demand. There were about a dozen excellent stallions shown, one wearing 5 prize medals. On the whole, the market was of rather more than an average description, both for number and quality. There was during the whole day a considerable influx of strangers into the town, and the fair terminated about 5 o'clock.

Summary Cases. - €”

The following cases at the instance of the Procurator Fiscal have been disposed of before Mr. Sheriff Robertson, during the past week –

6. Robert Heaps and Alexander Hunter, colliers at Blackbraes, charged with malicious mischief and rioting, and breach of the public peace; pleaded guilty to two of the charges, and were sentenced to pay a fine of 25s each, or to suffer 20 days' imprisonment.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 3rd July 1851

The Weather. –

 Within the last week an extraordinary change has taken place in the weather, which has already had a very marked effect upon vegetation of all kinds. On Saturday, although the wind was in the east, the heat was very great, and on the following day it rose to 120° of the thermometer in the sun, and 85° in the shade. The heat continued very oppressive during Monday and Tuesday, but a copious shower which fell on the evening of the latter day, accompanied by some thunder and lightning, had a sudden cooling effect, and throughout yesterday the air was rather chilly. Should we again be visited by heat the progress of the crops, all of which are promising uncommonly well, cannot fail to be very rapid.

Post-office Alterations.-

As will be seen from our; "Post-office Notabilia," considerable alterations have been made in our postal arrangements. We have now an additional mail to London and the South, and Edinburgh and the North, at 7.10 p.m., which is a considerable acquisition. A local post has also been appointed to Avonbridge, Blackbraes, and the surrounding district, the want of which has been long felt, in the difficulty and uncertainty of postal delivery in that quarter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 10th July 1851

EXTENSIVE SALE OF Spade and Shovel Handles, Cart Spokes, FILLIES, SLOTS, DEALS, TURNING-LATHES, &c. &c,

At Bankhead Saw-Mills, near Avonbridge, On Tuesday the 15th July, 1851. To be Sold by Public Roup, on Tuesday the 15th day of July, 1851, at Bankhead Saw-Mills, near Avonbridge (four miles south of Falkirk), THE whole of the Extensive Stock of FINISHED SPADE and SHOVEL HANDLES, CART SPOKES, FILLIES, SLOTS, TRAMS, TURNINGLATHES, SLIDING and other BENCHES, CIRCULAR SAWS, &c. &c, belonging to Mr. Jas. Gardner, who is retiring from the Bankhead Saw-Mills; and which comprises as follows : - 700 Doz. made and well-finished Spade and Shovel Handles, 2400 Cart Spokes, 120 Gangs of Cart Fillies, 1100 Cart Slots, Trams and Slots for 200 Coal and Ironstone Hutches, 400 Yards of one-inch Larch Deals, 300 Yards of three-fourth-inch Scotch Fir Deals, 22 Pairs of Oak Cart Trams, and a large quantity of Barrow Wood cut up, 1000 Feet of Ash and Wood, in trees not cut up, 20 Pairs of Cart Naves, A full set of Shovel Handle Benders, A Boring Machine for Railway Fencing, Sheep Flakes, &c, 3 Turning-Lathes, 2 Circular Saw Arbours, 8 Circular Saws, with Belts and Gearing, &c, 1 Sliding and 1 Fixed Sawing Bench, A Grinding Stone, and an immense quantity of undescribed Wood and other Effects connected with the Mills, all of which will be sold at the same time. The whole to be Sold in Lots, and Four Months' Credit given on Bills in the usual manner, or Discount for Cash. Roup to begin at 11 o'clock forenoon precisely. JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 31st July 1851

RAILWAY COMMUNICATION BETWEEN BATHGATE AND BO'NESS. –

We understand that it is the intention of the directors of the Monklands Railway Company to construct a branch from the main line east of Slamannan to the town of Bathgate. The line has been surveyed by Mr. Murdoch, civil-engineer, by whom plans have been drawn and the probable cost estimated. It will be about four miles in length leaving the Monklands or Slamannan line at a place called Blackstone, in Muiravonside, it will proceed nearly south-east, intersecting the parish of Torphichen to the west of that village, and then taking a more easterly direction, it will run in on the north side of Bathgate. Here it is intended to erect a terminus, and there will likewise be branches to the Edinburgh and Bathgate line, and to the Wilsontown Branch of the Caledonian Railway. It is not expected that many difficulties will be encountered in constructing the line, the worst gradient being only 1 in 100and the expense, it is estimated, will not be very great. We have not learnt whether it will be necessary to apply for an act of Parliament, but we believe that it is intended to commence operations whenever the preliminaries are arranged. The great advantage of this branch will be the establishment of direct communication between Bathgate and Bo'ness. The neighbourhood of the former town has recently attained considerable importance as a mineral district, and this branch will afford a direct outlet to the east coast for the valuable produce of the surrounding works. Bo'ness will benefit, to a corresponding extent, as the port for shipping the goods, which are at present put on board at Leith. To the inhabitants of the district generally, the branch will greatly improve the railway communication between the shores of the Forth and the inland parts of Linlithgowshire, which has hitherto been very circuitous and inconvenient.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 31st July 1851

DEATHS

At Avonbridge, Falkirk, on the 18th instant, the Rev. John Craig in the 47th year of his ministry.

 

 

 

 

 

Falkirk Herald 14th August 1851

OATS AND HAY, &c, AT GLENHEAD,

On Wednesday the 20th August. To be Sold by Public Roup, on Wednesday the 20th day of August, 1851, on the Farm of Glenhead, upon the Estate of Craigend, belonging to W. C. Learmonth M'Kenzie, Esq., 23 Acres of uncommonly fine Heavy OATS, 13 Ricks of RYEGRASS and CLOVER HAY, 6 Lots of FITCHES, and 6 Prime FAT CATTLE, Four months' credit on bills, or discount for cash.

 Roup to begin at Twelve o'clock noon precisely,

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

Railway Accident.

On Saturday evening the keeper of the gates at the level crossing of the Slamannan railway at Avonbridge had inadvertently retired to rest and shut the gate across the line, thinking that all the trains had passed for the night. Such, however, was not the case, for at twelve o'clock a very long train of coal waggons going towards Airdrie, and drawn by two engines, came up and went through both gates, dashing them to splinters. We are glad to say the train passed on its way without any further accent. The consequences might have been very serious, and we learn that the porter at the gate has since been dismissed for his negligence.

 

Falkirk Herald 14th& 21stAugust 1851

5000 Stones Ryegrass and Clover Hay, AND 17 ACRES OATS,

On Monday, 25th August. To be sold by Public Roup, on Monday the 25th day August, 1851 - on the Lands of Castlehill, upon the Estate of Muiravonside, belonging to Chas. Stirling, Esq., FIVE THOUSAND STONES of RYEGRASS and CLOVER HAY, in 24 Ricks, of particularly fine quality and SEVENTEEN ACRES of capital OATS. UP to Four months’ Credit on Bills, or Discount for Cash.

Roup to begin with the Oats, at 12 o'clock precisely.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 14th August 1851

BY ADJOURNMENT.

LONG LEASE OF SUBJECTS IN MUIRAVONSIDE FOR SALE.

There will be exposed to Sale, by Public Roup, within the Office in Wilson's Buildings, South side High Street, Falkirk, of Adam Smith, Writer there, on THURSDAY the 21st day of August current, at Two o'Clock Afternoon, A TACK of, and the LEASEHOLD RIGHT for 999 years after Whitsunday, 1838, and PROPERTY in, All and Whole that ANGLE of GROUND of TARDUFF MUIR, bounded by a part of said Muir on the West, by the road leading to Linlithgow Bridge on the South, and by another road on the East and North parts, as particularly mentioned in the Titles thereof; together with the Dwelling Houses and Buildings thereon, excepting the piece of said ground subset or assigned to, or lately occupied by John Duncan, but with right of relief from a part of the Tack-duty effeiring to such excepted ground. The above Subjects are presently tenanted by Andrew- Bartholomew and others; and the House is Licenced for Sale of Spirits. The gross Rental for the current year is about £10 15s. The vacant Ground may be advantageously built on, or subset or assigned.

For particulars, apply to Adam Smith, Writer, Wilson's Buildings, Falkirk, who will exhibit the Titles and Articles of Roup.

Falkirk, 8th August, 1851.

 

Falkirk Herald 21st August 1851

STRATHAVON SALE OF GROWING CROP, MILCH COWS, HAY, &c.

 On Saturday the 23d August. To be Sold by Public Roup, on Saturday the 23d day of August, 1851, on the Farm of Strathavon, near Avonbridge, possessed by Mr. William Waugh, THE whole of the very first-rate CROP of OATS, BARLEY, LINT, &c. &c, upon the above Lands, and which comprises - 

30 Acres of OATS,

 3 Acres of BARLEY,

5 Acres of LINT.

2 Acres of PRINCE REGENT POTATOES,

1 Stack of OATS.

6 Stacks of SEED HAY,

 3 MILCH COWS.

1 Two-year-old BULL,

1 BROOD MARE, 1 BROOD SOW and 5 PIGS,

2 Half-grown SWINE.

The whole to be Sold in Lots; 4 Months' Credit on Bills.

Roup to commence at 11 o'clock forenoon.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

5000 Stones Ryegrass and Clover Hay, AND 17 ACRES OATS, At Muiravonside, on Monday, 25th August. To be Sold by Public Roup, on Monday the 25th day of August, 1851, on the Lands of Castlehill, upon the Estate of Muiravonside, belonging to Chas. Stirling, Esq., FIVE THOUSAND STONES of RYEGRASS and CLOVER HAY, in 24 Ricks, of particularly fine quality, and SEVENTEEN ACRES of capital OATS.

Four Months' Credit on Bills, or Discount for Cash.

Roup to begin with the Oats, at 12 o'clock precisely.

 JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 4th September 1851

To the Editor of the Falkirk Herald.

Sir, - You are no doubt aware that there is a yearly tax levied on the labourers, artizans, &c, of the parish of Muiravonside in common with many other parishes, entitled the "Statute Labour Conversion Money," which is said to be appropriated to the repairing of roads, bridges, &c. Now, Sir, whether the money raised for this purpose is laid out to the best possible advantage or not would perhaps, be deemed presumption on my part to say. One thing, however, I know, that the roads in this part of the parish are non-improved the last six years. This is not an exaggerated assertion - it is a stubborn fact. I have had the pleasure of travelling over a good part of Scotland, and must say that I have never seen any roads so bad as these in this parish, and those of Slamannan! What is the reason, Sir? Is it because they are not regularly metalled ? No! This is not the reason. I have kept my eye about me a good deal of late, and I have discovered that the reason is to be found in the fact, that the water is not kept off them. I apprehend they may lay on as many square yards of metal as they can afford to do every year, but so long as no attention is paid to keeping the water off, we will never be able to vie with many neighbouring parishes for good roads. Only on Sabbath week, between Blackbraes Colliery and North Blackstone, there were three several parts of the road so flooded, that we were obliged to have recourse to the tops of dykes, the backs of hedges, and the crown of lea-riggs to get along. Were this a thing of rare occurrence, I would be the last man to say a word on the subject - but it occurs often. During last winter I know not how often I had to wade knee deep to get along, and many besides me. For this I see no necessity. I have taken the trouble of measuring the depth of the water several times, and found it to vary from l4 to 22 inches, and covering a surface of not less than 220 square yards in some places. And, Mr. Editor, it does not require a week of incessant rain to produce this state of things. No; only one day's constant rain does it, at any time. The trustees need not tell us they have no control over the weather, and therefore we must just put up with it. This we know; but have they not the power of causing the ditches to be scoured, and the water courses to be kept clear? If this were done, I see nothing to prevent us from having as good roads as we have near the dwellings of the aristocracy. If this is not to be remedied, I would suggest that we be furnished with three small boats, manned with a ferryman each, to take us through these places during soft weather. It is indeed a hard task to take people's money, and cause them to walk through standing water to the bargain. We can have foot baths in our own houses, Mr. Editor, if we need them, and therefore have no desire to take them while walking. I hope, Sir, the next time the charge for road money is sent us, it will come entitled "Taxation for furnishing the public with the privilege of walking through water.”

"ONE WHO PAYS ROAD MONEY.”

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 25th September, 2nd October 1851

TO MILLERS.

THAT OLD ESTABLISHED MILL at STRATHMILL is to be LET for such a Term of Years as may be agreed upon, with immediate entry.

Avon-Bridge Station, on the Slamannan Railway, is within one mile of the Mill.

Apply to Mr. Walter Gowans, Gowanbank, by Avonbridge.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 2nd October 1851

MINERAL SPECULATIONS. –

For the last two or three mouths the tract of country to the south of this, comprising chiefly the parish of Muiravonside and the high grounds of the parish of Falkirk, has been subjected to a very careful and extensive search for minerals. There being a prospect of the exhaustion, at no very remote period, of the ironstone in the Airdre district, the iron-masters there are finding it expedient to explore the minerals in other localities with a view to a future supply - in one case going even so far as the county of Fife - and they are accordingly directing their attention to this locality, in which the black band, clay band, and ball ironstone have already been worked, but only to a very limited extent. Leases have accordingly been entered into with the proprietors in the district by a number of well-known houses. Carmuirs has been let to Messrs Adie, Miller, & Rankine by Mr. Forbes. The same firm have taken a lease of Bonnside from Mr. Salmon; and they have also leased the Drum from Mr. Russell, the Beam from Mr. Wishart, and Thornton from Sir John Strachan. Lochgreen has been taken by Messrs Merry & Cunningham of Glasgow. The Grangemouth Coal Company have leased the Earl of Zetland's property at Castlecarry. Woodend, the property of Mr. Scott, is let to the Summerlee Company. Bonnyfield is being explored by Mr. Russell, the proprietor. Tippetcraig, Greenrig, and other farms adjoining, the property of Mr. Forbes, are taken by the Carron Company, and Messrs Russel & Son; and the latter firm also hold leases of Strathavon from Mr. Wardrop, and of other properties. Windy-yetts has been let to the Messrs Baird of Gartsherrie. Besides these estates, we learn that the minerals in one piece of land have been let within the present week at a rent of £1000 a-year and a lordship. The unfertile moorlands are thus in a fair way of being at a premium shortly. Everything, however, will depend upon the result of the search now going on. It has not yet been prosecuted long enough to afford any idea of the probable issue, but we believe that, within the last few days, black band of considerable thickness has been discovered by a firm who have lately been very fortunate in their mining adventures, and whose success in this instance we have no doubt our readers will be glad to hear of when circumstances enable us to give a more particular account of it. The same description of ironstone of very superior quality, and upwards of three feet thick has been worked by Messrs Merry & Cunningham at Lochgreen, for the last eighteen months. We are informed that in some cases in which the same seam has been come upon, it has been found to be of such an inferior quality as not to be worth working. We hope, however, that the discovery of good ironstone in the places mentioned will be followed by success in the others. Should such be the case, very extensive "diggings" will be immediately commenced in our neighbourhood, giving employment to a dense, population; and, although the unequal distribution of splint coal is an obstacle, there is nothing very improbable in the anticipation that the revival of the iron trade, which it is to be hoped is not far distant, will stimulate not only the mining, but the manufacture, of that important metal in the district.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 9th October 1851

SOCIAL

Meeting and Presentation. - On the evening of Tuesday the 16th ult., a number of themembers and adherents of the Evengelical Union Church, Avonbridge, entertained their pastor, the Rev. R. Anderson, and his partner in life, to a service of tea, as a mark of respect and esteem for him, when about to leave them and enter on a wider sphere of labour. Addresses on various subjects were delivered, and the meeting separated after having spent a very pleasant evening. On the evening of the 7th inst., a few of Mr. Anderson's friends waited on him and presented him with a number of valuable and useful works, bearing suitable inscriptions.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 16th 23rd October 1851

LONG TACKS of SUBJECTS in MUIRAVONSIDE TO BE SOLD.

There will be exposed to Sale, by Public Roup, within the House of James Bell, Innkeeper at Avonbridge, on SATURDAY the 25th day of October next, at Twelve o'Clock Noon, THE TWO TACKS aftermentioned of the respective SUBJECTS therein described, viz. : -

1st , A tack for Three Hundred Thousand Years, from Martinmas 1738, of ALL and WHOLE that part and portion of the deceased Archibald Bryce of Easter Hillhead of Ballenbreich, his outfield Lands of Hillhead called Jock's- Bought's-Face, near Half-an-Acre of Land or thereby, bounded by the Driftloan on the East, Kaes Bryce's Lands on the South and North parts, and the Lands of Ballenbreich on the West parts, - lying in the parish of Muiravonside, Barony of Ballenbreich, and Sheriffdom of Stirling - with the Tiends, and with power and privilege of casting two dargs of peats yearly from said Archibald Bryce's part of Drumbroider Moss.

2nd , A Tack for Three Hundred Thousand Years, from 20th May 1740, of ALL and WHOLE these two ridges of Land that belonged to the deceased William Eadie of Sharpsbanks - bounded by Jock's-Bought's-Face on the West, Allan Bryce's Lands on the South, East, and North parts thereof, - all lying within the parish, Barony, and Sheriffdom aforesaid, with the Tiends. Together with the HOUSES and BUILDINGS on said Lands, all as now occupied by Mary Inglis and others. The Lands extend to about or fully an Acre, The annual Tack Duties amount only to 6s. 8d. Scots, and therefore the Subjects present an eligible opportunity of creating a County Vote.

Apply to Adam Smith, Writer, Falkirk. Falkirk, 22d September, 1851.

 

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 30th October 1851

Jury Trials. –

 The following cases, at the instance of Mr. Gair, procurator-fiscal, Falkirk, were tried before Mr. Sheriff Robertson and a Jury at Stirling, on Monday last: - .

6. Andrew Crawford, accused of stealing a silver watch, in Muiravonside, pled guilty, and was sentenced to three months' imprisonment.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 30th October 1851

TURNIPS, MILCH COWS, QUEYS, DRAUGHT MARE. &c. &c, At STRATHAVON, on Monday the 3d Nov.

TO be Sold by Public Roup, on Monday the 3d day  of November, 1851. on the Farm of STRATHAVON, near Avonbridge, possessed by Mr. Wm. Waugh:

3 Acres of the very best Yellow Turnips,

2 Milch Cows, near the calving,

2 Farrow Cows.

2 Milch Cows, to calve in March,

4 Two-year-old Queys,

2 Highland Cows, for Marts,

1 Draught Mare, in foal,

1 Fat Sow,

 4 Half-grown Pigs,

1200 Stones of Ryegrass and Clover Hay, in a stack,

1 Stack of Seed Hay,

20 Bolls of Potatoes,

2 Wooden Ploughs,

and 2 Water Barrels.

Three Months' Credit on Bills, or Discount for Cash.

Roup to begin at Twelve o'clock noon.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 6th Glasgow Herald Monday 10th November 1851

Slamanan Horse and Cattle Fair. –

The second of the half-yearly fairs lately established in this locality was held on Tuesday last. The show of stock was less than last market, but it was generally considered to be of very superior quality. If this market be kept up, which we trust will be the case, we have no doubt it will be greatly for the benefit of the neighbourhood, and encourage the rearing of good stock. There was a very poor show of horses, and most of them inferior. Good work horses brought from £18 to £25, and inferior from £14 to £17. Calving cows were in good demand at high prices, some few bringing £10, and the average being about £8. There was rather a good turnout of people from the neighbourhood, and all the usual concomitants of a fair were visible in the crowded street of the village. We subjoin a few quotations: -Mr. Henry Aitken, Cattle-dealer, Avonbridge, sold a cow at £6 5s., and another at £4 10s. Mr. Nicol, Denny, bought two farrow cows at £10 5s., and another cow sold at £5. Mr. Gentleman, Avonbridge, sold three calving cows at £27 10s. Mr. John Neilson. Cockshill, bought a stot at £3 5s. Mr. A. Nimmo, Muiravonside, bought a calving cow at £10 10s. Mr. Alex Shanks, Gavil bought a quey at £8 considered the best in the market, Mr. James Scott. Binniehill, bought a two year-old filly at £25, considered the best of the age in the market. Another two-year-old colt was bought by Mr. John Shanks, Slater Hill, at £23. Mr. Shanks, Oakerdykes, sold a work horse at £18, and another good work horse brought £24.

The market was reckoned dull.

 

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 13th November 1851

DEATHS

At Avonbridge, on the 10th instant, William Bell, in the 79th year of his age.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 20th November 1851

Sheriff Criminal Court. –

The following cases, at the instance of the Procurator-Fiscal, have been disposed of summarily before Mr. Sheriff Robertson during the past week: -

3. Andrew Dinsmore, accused of theft at Avonbridge, aggravated by two previous convictions; pleaded guilty, and was sentenced to 60 days' imprisonment.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 4th December 1851

TWO EWES FOUND.

THERE were FOUND at AVONBRIDGE, on the Tuesday of the last October Tryst, Two BLACKFACED EWES. Application to be made to Jam.es Bell, Innkeeper, Avonbridge, within ten days from this date; and if not claimed by that time, the Ewes will be sold to defray expenses.

Avonbridge, 3d Dec. 1851.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 18th December 1851

ACCIDENT –

An accident occurred on Tuesday morning at one of the Carron Company's ironstone pits at Candiehill, in Muiravonside, by which a young man named John M'Lachlan nearly lost his life. He was in the act of descending the pit by the unusual method of swinging himself down by the rope. It appears that a bucket full of ironstone was standing at the time at the pit-head, and was attached to the rope. The weight of the man turned the gin above, and the consequence was that the bucket was raised from the ground and Part of the contents thrown down the pit. Some of the stones struck the man on the head and injured him very severely. He is now, we believe, lying in a very precarious state.

 

 

1852

Falkirk Herald Thursday 15th January 1852

SHERIFF AND JURY TRIALS. –

The following cases at the instance of Mr. Gair, Procurator-Fiscal, Falkirk, were disposed of before Mr. Sheriff Handyside and a jury, at Stirling, on Saturday last:-

1. Magaret Easton, lately a servant to Mr. Allan Bryce, of Blackstone in Muiravonside, was accused of the theft of a £10 note belonging to her master, from a chest of drawers in her master's house ; she pled guilty and was sentenced to 6 months' imprisonment.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 22nd January 1852

AVONBRIDGE. –

The pupils attending the Adventure School, taught by Mr. Dick, were examined, on the l5th instant, by the Rev. A. Dodds, minister, Avonbridge, and Mr. W. G. Gilchrist, Ashburton Grammar School. In reading, penmanship, and arithmetic, they showed much proficiency, and their attainments in Biblical instruction and English grammar were particularly gratifying. Altogether the proceedings were highly satisfactory, and reflected great credit on the talent, energy, and tact of the teacher.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 1st April 1852

TEACHER WANTED AVONBRIDGE SCHOOL.

He must be qualified to teach the usual branches of Education.

Apply to Alexander Main, Farmer, Bogo, by Avonbridge, on or before the 13th instant.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 4th,11th March 1852

MUIRAVONSIDE GRASS PARKS TO LET, AND 19 RICKS OF RYEGRASS AND CLOVER HAY TO BE SOLD,

On Monday the 15th March.

To be Let by Public Roup, on Monday the 15th day of March, 1852, THE extensive GRAZINGS upon the ESTATE of MUIRAVONSIDE, belonging to Charles Stirling, Esquire, which will be Let for Feeding and Grazing Cattle, Sheep, or Horses, viz. : - The GRASS PARKS at DRUMBOWIE, The GRASS PARKS at BOOS, The GRASS PARKS at CASTLEHILL, and The GRASS PARKS at SEATREES, Comprising in all 25 Enclosures of various sizes. The Fields are all well Fenced and Watered. Also, immediately after the Let of Grass Parks, there will be Sold, NINETEEN Large Ricks of RYEGRASS and CLOVER HAY, of famous quality.

 Credit till Martinmas on the Grass Parks, and Four Months' Credit on the Hay, on Bills.

Roup to begin with the Grass Parks at Drumbowie, at Twelve o'clock noon.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Perry’s Bankrupt Gazette Saturday 13th March 1852

SCOTCH PARTNERSHIPS DISSOLVED.

Gazette-Feb. 20, 1852.

HOWGATE GEORGE, WILLIAM HAWKSWORTH, and HENRY HOWGATE of Muiravonside, steel converters, refiners, & general merchants, 12th Feb.

Debts by Hawksworth.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 25th March 1852

SHERIFF AND JURY TRIALS. –

The following cases at the instance of Mr. Gair, Procurator Fiscal, Falkirk, were disposed of before Mr. Sheriff Robertson and a jury, at Stifling, on Monday last:-

1. Donald M'Leod, labourer, Laurieston, was charged with stealing some tools from a quarry near Polmont in January last, and also, about the same time, with breaking into a workshop on the Slamannan and Bo'ness Railway, in the parish of Muiravonside, and stealing therefrom a great number of articles; a previous conviction of theft was libelled on. The accused pleaded guilty, and was sentenced to 9 months' imprisonment.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 15th April 1852

STIRLING SPRING CIRCUIT.

The spring circuit of the High Court of Justiciary was opened at Stirling on Tuesday last, - the Lord Justice Clerk and Lord Wood presiding; Mr. Aitken, clerk; Charles Baillie, Esq., Advocate-Depute.

WILLIAM DAVIDSON, a collier, residing at Blackbraes, in the parish of Muiravonside, was charged with assaulting or using indecent practices to a girl of tender years, near the farm-house of Blackbraes. The prisoner pled guilty to the second count, and after a very impressive address, was sentenced to 15 months' imprisonment with hard labour.

ALEXANDER MONTEITH, junior, and WILLIAM CONOLLY, baker, Avonbridge, were charged with assault and robbery, in so far as (1), on the 21st November last, the said Alexander Monteith did, within the house in Cow Wynd of Falkirk, occupied by Janet Turnbull or McLaren, attack and assault the said Janet Turnbull, and wounded her to the effusion of her blood and injury of her person. (2) On the 21st or 22d November last, both or each of them, in the same house, did attack and assault James Pirie, Inland Revenue officer, Grahamston, and did seize hold of him by the collar, and did with their fists strike him several blows on the face and throw him down on the ground, and did take from his person an ink-glass, an excise permit, a handkerchief, and a hat. The charge was aggravated by two previous convictions. Conolly, who did not appear, was outlawed, and Alexander Monteith pled guilty to the charge of robbery, but not of assault, and the case consequently went to trial. After evidence being led the jury found the prisoner guilty, and Lord Wood sentenced him to 7 years' transportation. The prisoner on leaving the dock said, “I thank you, my Lord, I hope I will have the pleasure of dancing on your corpse when I come back."

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 22nd April 1852

SHERIFF CRIMINAL COURT. –

The following cases, at the instance of the Procurator-Fiscal, have been disposed of summarily at this Court during the past week : -

3. James M'Geadie, labourer, Camelon, accused of a Violent assault on Andrew Bryce in Muiravonside; pleaded guilty, and was sentenced to pay a fine of 40s., or to suffer 40 days' imprisonment.

GRASS PARKS TO LET, AND SALE OF MILCH COWS AND PIGS,

AT HILLEND, On Monday. April 26, 1852.

 TO be exposed by Public Roup, at Hillend, near Avonbridge, belonging to Mr. Thomas Wyse, on Monday the 26th April, 1852,

House Park, containing 12 Acres,

 Middie Low Park, containing 10 Acres.

 4 Milch Cows, near the calving.

3 Farrow Cows.

7 Swine, from 4 to 6 months old.

10 Pigs, 5 weeks old.

Usual Credit given.

Sale to commence at Two o'clock afternoon.

WILLIAM GILLESPIE, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 29th  April 1852

SLAMANNAN FAIR - 

The usual half-yearly fair was held in Slamannan on Tuesday last. The day was most delightful, and the crowds of people who assembled was certainly something new to the quiet village of Slamanan. The fair, for quantity of stock exhibited and the number of persons present, was the largest that has yet been held; and we are glad to say that this market, which we have no doubt will prove a great boon to the locality, may now be said to be established. The cattle brought forward were of fair average quality, though some of them, owing to the long continued drought and consequent want of pasture, did not show so well as might have been wished. The number of purchasers forward were pretty considerable, and prices for good quality were well supported. Inferior beasts were not in great demand, but for milk cows good prices were realised. Sellers seemed on the whole to consider it a very tolerable market. Good cows brought from £8 to £9, Mr. Rennie of Craigburn having sold perhaps the best beast in the market at something like the latter figure, and two others at £8 and £7 respectively. Mr. Shanks of Wester Jaw sold two farrow cows at £13, and another cow at £5. Mr. Barrie, Shortrigg, sold nine stots, seven at £28, and another pair of two-year-olds at £13. Mr. Gentleman of Avonbridge sold a pair of heifers at £8 8s.; and Mr. Taylor of Loch-house sold one quey at £4. Another gentleman we heard of sold three farrow cows at £14 10s. Mr. Henry Aitken of Avonbridge sold eight cows at prices ranging from £4 to £7 10s. The horse market was but poorly supplied with good beasts, though a few animals brought high prices. Mr. Brown of Middlerigg sold a pair of excellent work horses at £59 the pair. There were a great many inferior beasts, a number of which were unsold at the close of the market. A few, but very few, cattle were also driven off unsold. One or two excellent stallions were shown. On the whole the market was the best that has yet taken place in Slamannan, and it is hoped that it will be still better supported, as a more convenient place for a thriving fair cannot be found in that locality.

SHERIFF CRIMINAL COURT. –

The following cases at the instance of the Procurator-Fiscal have been disposed of summarily before Mr. Sheriff Robertson, during the past week: -

2. Daniel Cassels,collier, Blackbraes, accused of assault there, pled guilty, and was sentenced to pay a fine of 20s., or to suffer twenty days' imprisonment.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 13th May 1852

The following cases, at the instance of the Procurator-Fiscal, have been disposed of, summarily, at this Court before Sheriff Robertson during the past week: -

6. Andrew Dinsmore, from Avonbridge, accused of falsehood, fraud, and wilful imposition; pleaded guilty, and was sentenced to 60 days' imprisonment.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 6th, 13th May 1852

SALE OF WOOD AT MUIRAVONSIDE

On Tuesday, 18th May.

To be Sold by Public Roup  on Tuesday the 18th day of May, 1852, on the Estate of Muiravonside, belonging to Charles Stirling Esquire, about FIFTY LOTS of FULL-GROWN TIMBER, consisting of SAUGH, LARCH, SPRUCE, ANDASH WOOD. Most of the Trees are of large size and fine quality.

Four Months' Credit on Bills, or Discount for Cash.

Roup to commence at One o'clock afternoon.

The Wood is lying along the side of the Avenue leading to the Mansion-House, Muiravonside is near to Causewayend Station on the Slamanan Railway.

 JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 10th, 17th June 1852

TO LET, IN THE PARISH OF MUIRAVONSIDE AND COUNTY OF STIRLING,

ALL the MINERALS belonging to the Kirk- Session in the Lands of Candyend, consisting of upwards of 30 Acres. The Lands lie alongside of the Slamannan Railway.

For particulars, apply to Mr Henderson, Session- Clerk, with whom Offers may be lodged on or before 25th current. Muiravonside School, June 7, 1852.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 8th July 1852

TWO SHEEP LOST.

 There was Lost from a flock of Sheep travelling between Bathgate and Avonbridge, on Wednesday last, TWO WETHERS or EWE HOGS. Whoever has found the same, on restoring them to Mr. Marshall, Avonbridge, or to Mr. Gowans, of Gowanbank, will be Rewarded.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 5thAugust 1852

FATAL ACCIDENT. –

 On Monday afternoon a man named Peter Binnie, a meal and cheese dealer, belonging to Avonbridge, met his death in a very sudden manner, in consequence of a fall from his cart while he was working in a field of hay on the farm of Bulliondale. He did not fall more than six feet, but, unfortunately, he lighted upon his head, and dislocated his neck, causing almost instantaneous death. The deceased was well known in Falkirk and other market towns in the neighbourhood, which he regularly frequented.

THE CROPS AND THE HARVEST.-

From present appearances on all the early soils in this neighbourhood, there is every likelihood that the shearing; of barley will commence very generally in the beginning of next week. Some fields indeed are already so far advanced as to be quite ready for the sickle. On the uplands the crops are also well advanced, and promise to be ready as much before the usual time as the produce of the carse. The appearance of the potato disease in different parts of the country seems to have caused some uneasiness. So far as this neighbourhood is concerned, and we doubt not also the other localities where it has broken out, there, is no ground as yet for any alarm, for we believe the symptoms of the disease are not so general as they were last year, and last year's crop turned out the best since the blight first made its appearance.

SHERIFF CRIMINAL COURT. –

The following cases, at the instance of the Procurator-Fiscal, have been disposed of summarily at this Court, before Mr. Sheriff Robertson, during the past week: - Robert Roberts, accused of assault at Avonbridge; pleaded guilty. and was sentenced to pay a fine of 15s. or to suffer 15 days' imprisonment.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 12th August 1852

NOTICE TO CREDITORS.

 MRS. MARGARET MARSHALL or BINNIE, Widow of Peter Binnie, Corn Merchant at Newhouse, near Avonbridge, by Falkirk, requests that all persons having CLAIMS against her late Husband, will lodge the same, within fourteen days from this date, with William Storie, Writer in Falkirk.

Newhouse, 7th August, 1852.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 5th , Caledonian Mercury Thursday 12th August 1852

MARRIAGE.

At Haining Valley, Muiravonside, on the 3d instant, by the Rev. James M'Farlane. Mr. William Ritchie, farmer, Plean Mill, St Ninians, to Mary, eldest daughter of Henry Reid, Esq.

STRATHAVON GROWING CROP, HAY, HORSES, &c,

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 5th  12th 19th August 1852

On FRIDAY the 20th AUGUST. To be Sold by Public Roup, on Friday the 20th day of August, 1852, on the Farm of Strathavon, one Mile east from Avonbridge, possessed by Mr. William Waugh, THE whole GROWING CROP, OATS. LINT, HAY, &c, upon the above Farm, comprising

30 ACRES of OATS,

10 ACRES of LINT,

2 ACRES of PRINCE REGENT POTATOES, ready for using,

1000 STONES of RYEGRASS and CLOVER HAY in Ricks,

1 DRAUGHT HORSE,

2 BROOD MARES, and 2 FOALS;

1 CART, with Water Barrel, Wheels, and Axle, and 1 SET of HORSE HARNESS for Carting.

The Crops are heavy and evenly.(heavy or early?)

The whole to be Sold in Lots, and 4 Months' Credit given on Bills, or Discount for Cash.

Roup to begin at Twelve o'clock noon.

 JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 12th ,19th , 26th August 1852

MUIRAVONSIDE OATS AND HAY,

On FRIDAY, 27th AUGUST.

To be Sold by Public Roup, on Friday the 27th August, 1852, on the Farms of WESTER BOOS andCastlehill, upon the Estate of Muiravonside, TWENTY-ONE ACRES of OATS, and 2500 STONES of RYEGRASS and CLOVER HAY, in Ricks. To be Sold in Lots, and the usual Credit given.

Roup to begin with the OATS at Wester Boos, at Three o'clock afternoon.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 26th August 1852

GROWING OATS, LINT, FARM STOCKING, MILCH COWS, &c, FOR SALE.

To be Sold by Public Roup, at Ellrig Side and Newhouse, near Avonbridge, on Friday the 27th day of August, 1852, THE GROWING CROP, FARM STOCKING, &c, which belonged to the late Mr. Peter Binnie, consisting of

8 ACRES of OATS,

1 ACRE of LINT,

2 MILCH COWS,

4 QUEYS and STIRKS,

1 DRAUGHT HORSE,

2 Carts, 1 Iron Plough, 1 Pair of Harrows, 1 Pair of Fanners.

Horse Harness; together with the whole Barn and Dairy Utensils, and a variety of other articles.

The Usual Credit will be given.

Sale to begin at One o'clock afternoon.

WILLIAM CHRISTIE, Auctioneer.

 

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 2nd September 1852

SALE OF CROP, HAY, HORSE, FARMING IMPLEMENTS, HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE, &c,

At CROSSRIGG or GREENCRAIG, near Avonbridge,

On Tuesday the 7th September, 1852. To be Sold by Public Roup, on TUESDAY the 7th day of September, 1852, by virtue of a Warrant from the Sheriff, THE whole CROP and FARM STOCKING, &c, upon the Farm of Crossrigg or Greencraig, in the Parish of Muiravonside, possessed by James Aitken, comprising about 18 Acres of OATS,

5 Ricks of RYEGRASS HAY,

1 Acre of TURNIPS,

 A Plot of POTATOES, also,

 A quantity of POTATOES, GREENS, &c, in Garden.

About 15 Acres PASTURE GRASS to LET,

A Draught Horse and set of Horse Harness, 1 pair of Hand Fanners, 1 Cart with Wheels and Axle, 3 Milk Barrels, a quantity of Manure, a quantity of Straw, Stack Props, &c. Also. Household Furniture, viz :-A Chest of Mahogany Drawers, 3 Close Bedsteads with Bedding, 8 Chairs, 2 Tables, Dressing Glass, Cupboard, Dresser, and other Household Furniture, Dishes, &c. &c. READY cash.

Roup to begin at Twelve o'clock noon.

 JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 16th September 1852

FATAL ACCIDENT. –

On Friday last, while a breaksman on the Bo'ness and Slamanan Railway, named Robert Heddley, was sitting or standing between two trucks of a goods train which was in motion, by some accident he fell down between them, and the whole of the remainder of the train, consisting of three carriages and the engine, passed over his thighs, separating his legs from his body. The train was immediately stopped, and the unfortunate man conveyed to Bo'ness, where he expired in a few hours afterwards. The accident took place about a quarter of a mile from the junction of the Bo'ness branch with the Edinburgh and Glasgow line, near Myrehead, in the parish of Muiravonside. We understand the young man was unmarried and had been but a short time in the company's service.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 23rd September 1852

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, THAT CHRISTIAN HUNTER, now or lately residing at Rumford, in the parish of Muiravonside, and shire of Stirling, has been committed by the Sheriff of Stirlingshire to a place of safe custody, as a Dangerous Lunatic, on an application at the instance of the Procurator-Fiscal; and that the Sheriff has fixed Monday, next, the 27th day of September current, at One o'clock afternoon, within the Sheriff's Chambers, in Sword's Wynd of Falkirk, for taking evidence of the condition of the said Christian Hunter, with a view to her ultimate disposal, in terms of the Statute 4th and 5th Victoria, cap. 60.

JOHN GAIR, Procurator-Fiscal. Falkirk, 22d September, 1852.

SHOE AND HARNESS LEATHER.

DICK & GARDNER, TANNERS AND CURRIERS, BEG to intimate to Shoemakers, Saddlers, &c, that they have opened a TAN-WORK at AVONBRIDGE, where they are manufacturing the different sorts of Leather generally in use, and which they intend to dispose of at the lowest prices FOR cash.

 Avonbridge, 22d Sept., 1852.

 

 

 

 

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 14th October 1852

STRAYED

From near Kincardine Ferry, on Tuesday last. A TWO-YEAR-OLD BROWN QUEY, apparently within three weeks of Calving. Any person having found the same by giving notice to Alex. RATTRAY, Innkeeper, Falkirk, or Alex. NIMMO, Farmer, Whiterigg, Muiravonside, will be handsomely rewarded.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 4th November 1852

Correspondence

TORPHICHEN ROADS.

(To the Editor of the Falkirk Herald.)

Sir,

My attention has been called to a letter in your paper of last week, dated Falkirk. 24th Oct., 1852, and signed "J.," calling your attention to the state of the parish roads of Torphichen, which, according to his description, are in a most wretched state, but your correspondent appears to be very ignorant of the boundaries of the parish. He says " I cannot help admiring the patience of the farmers and other gentlemen in the neighbourhood of Avonbridge, to which part of the parish I particularly refer, in submitting to have their roads in such a disgraceful state, &c." I dare say I need not inform you or any other person who Has the slightest knowledge of that locality, that Avonbridge is situated in the parishes of Muiravonside and Slamannan and county of Stirling, and that all the roads in that district are under the management of the Trustees of these parishes, the roads in Torphichen parish not commencing till you cross the Linn-Mill Bridge, which is half a mile distant from Avonbridge, where, I think, your correspondent will be at a loss to point out any water holes that would drown a sparrow, far less a Falkirk gallant. But your correspondent appears to be as ignorant of the other matters in Torphichen parish as he is regarding the boundaries; he says ''that nearly £100 a year is raised in road money" -this statement is incorrect. The amount raised by assessment for the maintenance of the roads in the western division of the parish of Torphichen is £81 6s. 6d. yearly, from which deduct clerk and collector's salary, with expense of advertising and recording the accounts, £3 9s. 3d., leaving less than £78 to be laid out on nearly 17 miles of roads, with 3 miles of bye-roads which are occasionally repaired, - making altogether about 20 miles of roads, which, I think, will stand a favourable comparison with any road in the district. I leave the public to judge of this. Regarding the latter part of his communication, about a wonderful patriotic and model Road-Trustee, I have just to state, that the road to the south of that individual's property, which he rendered utterly impassible by his carting operations when he built his house and steading, was repaired at the joint expense of him and the road funds, and the road to the west was made at the expense of the road funds, with the exception of a few carts of stones given by this individual, and carting the earth from the sides of the road (which I dare say would not have been done had it not been to serve himself.) Indeed last year the whole fund allocated to that district was laid out by this person upon the road bounding his own property and a few yards beyond it, leaving upwards of two miles without a single stone laid upon it or a track drawn in. This matter was brought before the annual meeting in April last, when this model Trustee confessed he had never even seen the extremity of the district he pretended to take charge of. However, if he wishes to have the roads made in the same manner as the Turnpike road from Queensferry and Cramond to Edinburgh I dare say the other Road-Trustees will have no objections, provided he does so at his own expense. Hitherto he has not been very profuse in giving any assistance out of his private funds; indeed there are other gentlemen in the neighbourhood who have given liberally both of their valuable time and private funds to improve the roads, and made no noise about it. Hoping that your correspondent, the next time he addresses you, will endeavour to get more accurate information before he ventures to make such statements,  -

I am, &c, ALEXANDER WARDROP

Convener of the Road-Trustees of the Western Division of Torphichen. Crawhill House, 2d Nov., 1852

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 11th, 18th 25th November 1852

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,

That application is intended to be made to Parliament, in the ensuing Session, for leave to bring in a Bill for the purposes following, or some of them, that is to say, to empower the Monkland Railways Company to make and maintain the following Railways, or some of them, viz. First, A Railway diverging from and out of the line of Railway belonging to the Monkland Railways Company called the Slamannan Railway, at or near to Blackstone, in the Parish of Muiravonside and County of Stirling, and terminating at or near to Boghead, in the Parish of Bathgate and County of Linlithgow, by a junction with the Branch Railway belonging to the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway Company, leading from the main line of the Wilsontown, Morningside, & Coltness Railway, also belonging to the said last-mentioned Company, near Whitburn, to Bathgate, which intended Railway will pass from, through, or into the Parish of Muiravonside, in the County of Stirling, and the Parishes of Torphichen and Bathgate, and the Town or Burgh of Bathgate, all in the County of Linlithgow, or some of them. Second, A Branch Railway, diverging from and out of the intended Railway above described, at or near to Kaemuir, in the Parish of Muiravonside and County of Stirling, and pasing through and terminating in the aforesaid Parish and County, by a Junction with the said Slamannan Railway, at or near to Candie, in the said Parish and County. Third, A Branch Railway diverging from and out of the intended Railway first above described, at or near to South Coustoun, in the Parish of Bathgate and County of Linlithgow, and passing through and terminating in the said Parish and County, at or near to Armadale Toll, Fourth. Another Branch Railway from and out of the intended Railway first above described, at or near to Bathgate Mill, in the Parish of Bathgate and County of Linlithgow, and terminating at or near to Bathgate Mill aforesaid, in the said Parish and County, and passing from, through, or into, the said Parish of Bathgate and the Town or Burgh of Bathgate, in the County of Linlithgow, or one of them. Fifth, A Railway diverging from and out of the intended Railway first above described, at or near to Boghead, in the said Parish of Bathgate and County of Linlithgow, and terminating at or near to Cowdenhead, in the said Parish and County, and passing from, through, or into the said Parish of Bathgate, and the Town or Burgh of Bathgate, in the County of Linlithgow, and the Parish of Shotts, in the County of Lanark, or some of them. Sixth, A Branch Railway diverging from and out of the intended Railway fifth above described, at or near to Boghead, in the Parish of Bathgate and County of Linlithgow, and terminating in the said Parish and County, at or near to Boghead aforesaid, by a Junction with the said Branch Railway, belonging to the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway- Company, leading from the Main Line of the said Wilsontown, Morningside, & Coltness Railway, near Whitburn, to Bathgate, and passing from, through, or into the said Parish of Bathgate, and the Town or Burgh of Bathgate, in the County of Linlithgow, or one of them. Seventh, A Branch Railway diverging from and out of the intended Railway fifth above described, at or near to Whiteside, in the said Parish of Bathgate and County of Linlithgow, and passing through and terminating in the said Parish and County, at or near to Torbanehill. Eight, A Branch Railway diverging from and out of the intended Railway fifth above described, at or near to Trees, in the said Parish of Bathgate and County of Linlithgow, and passing through and terminating in the said Parish and County, at or near to Armadale Toll. Ninth, A Railway diverging from and out of the intended Railway fifth above described, at or near to Cowdenhead aforesaid, and terminating at or near to Colliertree, in the Parish of New Monkland and County of Lanark, by a Junction with the Clarkston Branch of the Ballochney Railway, belonging to the said Monkland Railways Company, and passing from, through, or into the said Parishes of Bathgate and Torphichen in the County of Linlithgow, and Shotts and New Monkland in the County of Lanark, or some of them. Tenth, A Railway diverging out of the Clarkston Branch of the said Ballochney Railway, at or near to Colliertree, in the Parish of New Monkland, and County of Lanark, and terminating at or near to the Monkland Iron & Steel Works, in the Parish of Old Monkland, and County aforesaid, which intended Railway will pass from, through, or into the Parishes of New Monkland, Old Monkland, and Bothwell, and the Burgh of Airdrie, all in the said County of Lanark, or some of them. And to make and maintain all proper Works and Conveniences in connection with the said several Railways, and to take powers for the compulsory purchase of Lands, Houses, and other Property, for the purposes of such Railways and other Works. AND NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN, That Duplicate Plans and Sections, describing the Lines, Situations, and Levels of the said intended Railways and Works, and the Lands, Houses, and other Property which may be required to be taken for the purpose of such Railways and Works, together with Books of Reference to such Plans, containing the Names of the Owners or reputed Owners, Lessees or reputed Lessees, and Occupiers of such Lands, Houses, and Property, and a published Map, with the Lines of the proposed Railways and Works delineated thereon, so as to show their general course and direction, and a copy of this Notice, as published in the Edinburgh Gazette, will, on or before the 30th clay of November current, be deposited for public inspection, in the Offices, at Stilling and Falkirk, of the principal Sheriff-Clerk of the County; in the Office, at Linlithgow, of the principal Sheriff-Clerk' of the County of Linlithgow; and in the Offices, at Glasgow, Hamilton, and Airdrie, of the principal Sheriff-Clerk of the County of Lanark; and that a copy of so much of the said Plans, Sections, and Books of Reference as relates to each of the said Parishes, and to the said Town or Burgh of Bathgate, and to the said Burgh of Airdrie, and a copy of this Notice will also, on or before the 30th day of November current, be deposited for public inspection, with the Schoolmaster, or if there be no Schoolmaster, then with the Session-Clerk of each of the said Parishes, at the usual place of abode of each of such Schoolmaster or Session- Clerk, and with the Town-Clerk of the said Town or Burgh of Bathgate and Burgh of Airdrie, respectively, at the respective Offices of each such Town-Clerk. AND NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN, That it is intended by the said Bill to take power to deviate the construction of the Railways and Works before set forth, from the lines delineated on the said Plans, intended to be deposited as aforesaid, to such an extent as will be defined on the said Plans ; and also to cross, stop up, alter, and divert, such highways, turnpike and other roads, railways, bridges, streets, paths, passages, rivers, canals, brooks, streams, sewers, waters, and water-courses, as it may be necessary or expedient to cross, stop up, alter, or divert, for the purpose of making, maintaining, and using, the Railways and Works before set forth, or any portion thereof, or any of the conveniences connected therewith. AND NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN, That it is intended by the said Bill to vary and extinguish all existing rights and privileges connected with the lands, houses, and other property, to be purchased as aforesaid, or which would in any manner impede or interfere with the construction of the Railways and Works before set forth, or any of them, or with the maintenance or use thereof, and to confer other rights and privileges ; and also to take powers to the Monkland Railways Company to levy tolls, rates, and duties, on or for the use of the said intended Railways and Works, and to confer, vary, or extinguish exemptions from payment of tolls, rates, and duties. And it is also proposed by the said Bill to authorise the said Monkland Railways Company to raise Money, for the purposes aforesaid, or any of them, by the creation of Shares, with or without a guaranteed preference or priority in the payment of dividend, or by Mortgage or Bond, or by all or any of such means ; And it is also proposed to authorise the said Company to fund the whole or any part of the Loans which the said Company have received, or may hereafter receive, on Mortgage or Bond, or to raise the amount of such Loans or part thereof, by creating new Shares or Stock in the said Company, with a guaranteed or preferential Dividend, of such amount and with such special privileges as may lip fixed by the said intended Bill. AND NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN, that it is intended by the said Bill to vary or extinguish all such Rights and Privileges as may in any manner interfere with the nhiects aforesaid, or any of them. AND NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN, That, for the above and other purposes, it is intended by the said Bill to alter and amend the following Acts, or some of them, viz. The Slamannan  & Borrowstouness Railway Act, 1846 ; The Monkland Railways Act, 1848 ; and the Monkland Railways (Slamannan & Borrowstouness Deviation) Act, 1851 ; And also, so far as necessary, the several Acts therein recited, or some of them. AND NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN, That printed copies of the said Bill will be deposited in the Private Bill Office of the House of Commons, on or before the 31st day of December next.

Dated this 3d day of November, 1852.

MITCHELL, ALLARDICE, & MITCHELL, Solicitors, Glasgow.

G. H. LANG, Parliamentary Agent , Westminster,

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 18th November 1852

Correspondence

THE ROADS IN THE PARISH OF TORPHICHEN.

(To the Editor of the Falkirk Herald.)

Mr. Editor, I have just seen in your journal what Mr. Alex. Wardrop, convener of the Road- Trustees in the Western Division of Torphichen, intends as a reply to a few observations which I made in your paper a week or two ago. I have no doubt that Mr. Wardrop considers it as proving in a remarkable manner that the Road Trustees are a body of men exceedingly zealous in the improvement of their roads ; but I have been unable to discover in his letter any trace of a reply to my objections to the state of the roads. Mr. Wardrop begins by accusing me of the most thorough ignorance of where Torphichen is, and consequently insinuates that for me to talk of the roads is most unheard-of presumption. He then proceeds to tell me, with great gravity that the "village of Avonbridge is situated in the parishes of Muiravonside and Slamannan, and county of Stirling.'' Now, though Mr. Wardrop may think he has conferred a favour by telling me where Avonbridge is, still I may be allowed to say that I did not require to be enlightened by him on the subject, - though, in the beginning of my letter, speaking of the neighbourhood of the village, 1 afterwards inadvertently said that it instead of its neighbourhood was in Torphichen. By Mr. Wardrop's own showing the roads half a mile from the village are in Torphichen. so that even if I had been ignorant, which I was not, such a slight mistake, and one not bearing on the subject, is excusable, in one confessedly nothing more than a traveller in that locality. But even taking Mr. Wardrop's argument at its full value, I am at a loss to see how it can weigh against a plan for the improvement of the Roads in Torphichen, that Avonbridge is situated in the parishes of Slamannan and Muiravonside and county of Stirling. Such, however, is Mr. Wardrop's first argument; and he winds it up with affirming that there is not in the roads of Torphichen above the Linn-Mill Bridge - the commencement of the parish - a hole that would drown a sparrow, One of two things must be true - either that Mr. Wardrop has not lately seen the roads, or that the sparrows he sees at Crawhill are of monstrous dimensions, compared with those we have at Falkirk. I said that nearly £100 was collected, and Mr. Wardrop has shown it to be a sum not vastly less. I still say, however, that £81 6s. 6d. judiciously spent yearly in forming the roads, where they can have metal so easily as in Torphichen, should soon make them all that could be desired. However, Mr. Wardrop conceives, and justly too, that his roads will bear a comparison with the others in the district. If this is all the comparison they can bear, they must surely, Mr. Editor, be bad enough. But, Sir, if Mr. Wardrop had no reply to make, save to stigmatise me as ignorant, I cannot help thinking that all parties would have reaped more benefit if he had set about improving the roads, rather than have penned anything on the subject. The former course of conduct the public could have appreciated, and thanked him for, while the latter, I am afraid, will not be so much thought of. I think, therefore, his better plan is to mend his ways. In regard to the not very becoming language used by Mr. Wardrop in reference to one of the Trustees, it is but just in me to say that that gentleman is entirely guiltless of any of the ''noise,'' as Mr. Wardrop terms it, that I have made about the roads. Had none talked, however, but those having as good a right as that gentleman, you would not, Mr. Editor, have been troubled with some of the communications you have published on this subject. In conclusion, Mr. Editor, as a very talented author once said, that though he never answered any attacks upon his book, yet he saw by the railing of Warburton that it was getting into good company, - so I may say that the railing of the convener is a proof that I have been the means of causing a consideration of the subject at headquarters, which was all I intended. My end having been gained, I have done; and I shall patiently wait, and sincerely hope that the result of such consideration on the part of the Road-Trustees will be that the roads under their charge will soon bear a favourable comparison, not with such roads as those of Slamannan, but with other well-regulated trusts in the kingdom. –

 I am, &c, J.

Falkirk, 10th Nov. 1852.

P.S. - Since writing the above, Mr. Editor. I am glad to learn that the effect of my letter has been a very great improvement upon the roads under review. Into some of the holes which Mr. Wardrop said would not drown a sparrow, cart-loads of stones have been emptied, and the road now presents, as you may believe, a very great contrast to its former state. This, sir, is a far More tangible reply to my communication in regard to the roads than the letter you published from Mr. Wardrop, while it is at the same time the best reply I can give to his letter. It is a result with which I am sure all parties will be highly satisfied.

 

London Standard Friday 17th December 1852

DEATHS.

 On the 9th inst., at The Elms, Surrey, Char: Sarah, last surviving daughter of the late Charles Lockhart. Lee and Carnwath, and Elizabeth Macdonald, of Largie and Muiravonside.

 

Falkirk Herald 23rd December 1852

FOR SALE,

 A Strong. Active, Serviceable, and Handsome GREY MARE, Seven Years old, 15.1 high ; pleasant to ride and perfect in harness ; warranted sound, and free from vice.

Apply to Messrs William Robertson & Son, Farmers, Village of Maddiston, between one and two miles south of Polmont Junction.

 

1853

Dundee, Perth, and Cupar Advertiser Friday 29th April 1853

Births

At Muiravonside Manse, near Linlithgow, on the 25th current, of a daughter.

 

Glasgow Herald 14th March 1853

ROUP OF TOLLS, AND MEETING OF TRUSTEES, ON THE BATHGATE AND ARDRIE R0AD.

A GENERAL STATUTORY MEETING of the TRUSTEES, on the Turnpike Road, from the New Bridge over the Water of Almond to Baillieston by Bathgate and Airdrie, will be held at West Craigs, on Saturday- the 2nd day of April, 1853, at 12 o'clock Noon. At this Meeting, orders will be given for the erection of a Toll or Check Bar at the West end of the town of Bathgate, between the Houses and the Parish Road leading to Avonbridge by Bathgate Mills. The Trustees will there, (at West Craigs,) on the same day, at One o'clock P.M, proceed to Let the Toll Duties exigible for the year, from 15th May, 1853, to 15th May, l854 at the following Bars, viz.:-

 NEWLISTON, BEDLORMIE,

BROXBURN, AIRDRIE,

BATHGATE, and ARMADALE. 

COATDYKE and BAILLIESTON.

AND OTHER CHECK AND SIDE BARS.

Intending Tacksmen must be prepared to produce instant sufficient Caution, or their offers will be rejected.

The Articles of Roup will be seen in the hands of William Waddell, W.S., 10 Carlton Terrace.

Edinburgh, 12th March, 1853.

 

Glasgow Herald 9th September 1953

MONKLAND RAILWAYS COMPANY.

BATHGATE BRANCH RAILWAY.

THE DIRECTORS of this COMPANY are prepared to receive TENDERS for the construction of the above named Branch Railway, diverging from their Slamannan Railway at Blackstone, and terminating with a Junction with the Wilsontown, Morningside, and Coltness Railway, near Boghead, being a distance of about Four Miles and Fifty-six Chains.The Plans and Specification, &c., may be seen at the Office of the Resident Engineer, Mr. Joseph Cochran, Royal Terrace, Linlithgow, on and after Thursday the 15th inst.; and on Tuesday the 20th inst., the Engineer will be at this Company's Avonbridge Station at 11 o'clock, to point out the Line to  intending offerers. Forms of Tender may be obtained here; or at the Office of the Resident Engineer, and Tenders in any other form will not be received. Sealed Tenders addressed to the Directors of the Company, and marked "Tenders for Works," must be lodged here not later than Monday the 26th instant. The Directors do not bind themselves to accept the lowest or any Tender. By Order of the Directors. B. B. REED, Engineer and Manager. Monkland Railways Office,  37 West George Street, Glasgow, 6th September, 1853.

 

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 29th September, London Standard Friday 23 September 1853

Deaths

At Eltham, Kent, on the 21st instant, Walter, youngest son of Charles Stirling, Esq. of Muiravonside.

 

1854

 

Inverness Courier Thursday 12th January 1854

MAN FROZEN TO DEATH. – Last week it was our painful duty to record the death from exposure of a poor sailor, who, in a state of inebriation, lay down in Grahamston one night and was found next morning frozen to death. Already we have to record another melancholy case of the same kind. The victim is a poor man, a stranger to the district, name unknown. He had lately been employed in a quarry at Armadale, between Bathgate and Avonbridge. On the night of Friday last he was seen staggering about, evidently intoxicated, in the vicinity of a stackyard at the back of Mr. Shaw, baker, Avonbridge. Next morning he was found lying against a stack, quite dead. He is thought to have been about thirty years of age. – Falkirk Herald.

 

Glasgow Herald Friday 16th June 1854

Advertisements & Notices

STIRLINGSHIRE.

 A MINERAL FIELD TO LET

THE COAL and IRONSTONE in the Estate of Redford, in the Parish of Muiravonside, containing about 400 Imperial Acres, is to be Let on such terms as may be agreed on. From bores and a pit shanked upon the Lands, both Coal and Ironstone have been found, the Coal being from three to four feet in thickness, and of an excellent quality. The Slamannan Branch of the Monkland Railways intersects the Lanes, affording a ready means of transit to the Iron Works in the Monkland district and the chief mineral markets.

Apply to John Graham, Esq. of Redford, by Linlithgow, the Proprietor; or to A. & J. Graham, Writers, 42 George Square, Glasgow.

 

Caledonian Mercury 11th September 1854

A few days ago a cat at a house in Maddiston brought forth at a kitten having two heads, four ears, and three eyes

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 14th, 21st December 1854

ASSESSED TAXES 1854-55.

APPEAL COURTS, COUNTY OF STIRLING.

THE Commissioners of Supply for the several Districts of the County of Stirling will meet, on the days and at the places undermentioned, to hear and determine Appeals against the charges made by the Surveyor for the current year :-

For the Parishes of Airth, Bothkenner, Larbert, Muiravonside, Polmont and Slamannan –

 in the Court-House at Falkirk, on Thursday the 4th January next, at Twelve o'clock Noon.

 

 

1855

 

Glasgow Herald Wednesday 23rd; Falkirk Herald Thursday 24th January 1855

The Linlithgow and Stirlingshire fox-hounds will meet on Thursday the 24th January, at Avonbridge; and Saturday the 26th, at Dechmont, each morning at a quarter before eleven o'clock.

 

Falkirk Herald 28th 31st ; Glasgow Herald 28th 30th  January 1855

The Linlithgow and Stirlingshire fox-hounds will meet on Tuesday the 29th January, at Barnton House; Thursday the 31st, at Dechmont; and Saturday the 2nd February, at Avonbridge, each morning at a quarter before eleven o'clock.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 7th February 1855

GRASS PARKS TO LET, AND SALE OF MILCH COWS,

AT HILLEND, On Saturday the 9th February, 1856. To be exposed by Public Roup, at Hillend, near Avonbridge, belonging to Mr. Thomas Wyse, on Saturday the 9th February, 1856,

THE GRASS PARKS at HILLEND; also, TWO MILCH COWS near the Calving. The Fields are well Watered, Fenced, and Sheltered.

Roup to commence at One o'clock afternoon.

WM. GILLESPIE, Auctioneer.

 

Glasgow Herald Monday 14th May 1855

LANDS NEAR FALKIRK FOR SALE.

UPSET PRICE, £700

To be Sold, by Public Roup, within the Red Lion Hotel,Falkirk, upon Thursday the 17th current, at Two o'clockAfternoon, (unless previously disposed of by private bargain)

THE LANDS of FOGGERMOUNTAIN and Others, lying near to the village of Avonbridge, about six miles south of Falkirk, end the same distance west of Linlithgow, with the Ironstone and Fire Clay therein. The Lands extend to 42 1/2 Acres, or thereby, Scottish measure, - and are capable of much improvement. The Slamannan Railway, which intersects the Property, would afford a ready means of transport for the the Minerals. Immediate Entry may be given. The Feu-duty and public burdens are small.

Further particulars will be obtained on application to R. R. Glen, Esq., Writer, Linlithigow; or to Messrs. Mitchell, Allardice & Mitchell, Writers, 36 Miller Street, Glasgow, who will also exhibit the Title' Deeds and Articles of Roup.

Glasgow, 5th May, 1855.

 

Stirling Observer 21st June 1855

Marriages

At Maddiston, Stirlingshire, on the 12th instant, by the Rev. Jas. M'Farlane.

Mr. James Bain, stationer, to Elizabeth, second daughter of William Baird, Esq., Hollandbush.

 

Aberdeen Journal Wednesday 20th, Stirling Observer Thursday 21st, June 1855

VALUABLE DISCOVERIES OF IRONSTONE. –

Adjoining Avon Bridge, in the parish of Muiravonside, in this county, some most valuable seams of ironstone have recently been discovered. Ironstone of the best kind has also just been found out by the Messrs Baird of Gartsherrie, near Bridgehill, on the lands of Bogo, at a depth only of fifteen fathoms. The Messrs Russell of Falkirk, moreover, have also just discovered another most valuable mineral bed of the finest ironstone on the property of George Gray of Windy Yetts, while the appearances in a quarry not far distant in the same locality have been considered by mineralogists to indicate the existence of blackband at not a very great depth beneath the surface.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 20th September 1855

Births

At Muiravonside Manse, on the 14th instant, the wife of the Rev. James M'Farlane, of a son.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 11th October 1855

FALKIRK

BITING OFF A MAX'S NOSE. –

On Friday a case of assault of a very vicious character occurred in the parish of Muiravonside. Peter Forgie, flesher there, and John Gardner, quarryman, had been drinking together for some time in a public-house on their way home. Gardner, without any apparent provocation, turned round upon Forgie, caught him by the hair of the head, and, ruffian-like, bit off a part of his nose.

The accused is in custody.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 27th December 1855

ASSESSED TAXES, 1855-56.

APPEAL COURTS, COUNTY OF STIRLING.

THE Commissioners of Supply for the several Districts of the County of Stirling will meet, on the days and at the places undermentioned, to hear and determine Appeals against the Charges made by the Surveyor for the current year :-

For the Burgh and Parish of Falkirk, and the Parishes of Airth, Bothkennar, Larbert, Muiravonside, Polmont, and Slamannan - In the Court- House at Falkirk, on Monday the 7th day of January, 1856, at Twelve o'Clock Noon.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 27th December 1855

SHERIFF JURY TRIALS. On Monday last, the following cases were disposed of before John Morrison Duncan, Esq., Advocate, Sheriff- Substitute of Falkirk, and a jury : -

ASSAULT - DAMAGING A MAN'S NOSE.

John Gardner was charged with having, on 28th September last, assaulted Peter Forgie, a flesher, in a field known as Loanhead Park, parish of Muiravonside, and with knocking him to the ground, and inflicting a severe wound upon the said Peter Forgie's nose, and tearing off a portion of his right nostril, to the great effusion of his blood and severe injury of his person. The prisoner pled not guilty at a former diet, but now gave in a plea of guilty, and was sentenced to three calendar months' imprisonment, two of them with hard labour.

 

 

1856

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 14th 21st,28th, February 1856

MUIRAVONSIDE GRASS PARKS,

On MONDAY the 3d March. To be Let by Public Roup, on Monday the 3d day of March, 1856, THE GRASS PARKS on the ESTATE of MUIRAVONSIDE, comprising SEVEN ENCLOSURES at DRUMBOWIE, to be Let for Cattle and Horses; and FOUR ENCLOSURES at SEATREES, to be let for Sheep. The Fields are all Fenced and Watered, as formerly.

Roup to begin with the Parks at Drumbowie, at One o'clock afternoon.

 JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 28th February 1856

 

QUARTERLY RETURN OF BIRTHS,

DEATHS, AND MARRIAGES IN SCOTLAND.

The following are the returns from the parishes in our district:-

Births. Deaths. Marriages.

Muiravonside. ... ...          20           9             12

Slamannan. ... ...              38           13           7

Torphichen, ... ...              11           5             4

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 6th March 1856

SALE OF CROP AND FARM STOCKING,

ON THE FARM OF CANDYEND, On WEDNESDAY, 12th MARCH, 1856.

To be Sold by Public Roup, by a Warrant from the Sheriff, on Wednesday the 12th day of March 1856, on the Farm of Candyend, in the Parish of Muiravonside, possessed by John Nimmo,

THE whole Crop of OATS, BEANS. BARLEY, HAY, LINT, POTATOES and TURNIPS, grown upon the Lands of Candyend and Howloan, in 1855.

Also,

2 Milch Cows,

3 Two-year-old Queys,

1 Draught Horse,

1 Sow,

2 Close-bodied Carts,

1 Dreg Cart,

1 Plough and Pair of Harrows.

A Stone Roller,

2 Sets of Horse Harness, and A quantity of Household Furniture.

READY CASH.

Roup to begin at One o'clock afternoon precisely.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 27th March 1856

DEATHS
At Melbourne, on the 8th December last, William Taylor youngest son of the late Mr. James Taylor, Manuelburn-bridge, Muiravonside.

 

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 3rd  10th 17th 24th April 1st 8th May 1856

HOUSE NEAR AVONBRIDGE TO LET.

To Let, with Entry at Whitsunday next, THE LOWER FLAT of HILLEND HOUSE, suit- able for a respectable family; together with Byre, Milk-House, &c, and a large Garden fully stocked with Fruit Trees and Bushes. Hillend House is pleasantly situated on the banks of the Avon, and is within five minutes' walk of the Railway Station at Avonbridge.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 10th April 1856

ADJOURNED SALE

 OF CROP AND FARM STOCKING,

ON THE FARM OF CANDYEND, On TUESDAY 15TH APRIL 1856.

To be Sold by Public Roup, by a Warrant from the Sheriff, on Wednesday the 12th day of March 1856, on the Farm of Candyend, in the Parish of Muiravonside, possessed by John Nimmo,

THE whole Crop of OATS, BEANS. BARLEY, HAY, LINT, POTATOES and TURNIPS, grown upon the Lands of Candyend and Howloan, in 1855.

Also,

2 Milch Cows,

3 Two-year-old Queys,

1 Draught Horse,

1 Sow,

2 Close-bodied Carts,

1 Dreg Cart,

1 Plough and Pair of Harrows.

A Stone Roller,

2 Sets of Horse Harness, and A quantity of Household Furniture.

READY CASH.

Roup to begin at One o'clock afternoon precisely.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 17th April 1856

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,

THAT ROBERT LOVE, son of and residing with Agnes Fyfe or Love, a widow, at Stanrig, in the parish of Muiravonside and shire of Stirling, has been committed to a place of safe custody in Falkirk as a DANGEROUS LUNATIC, on an application at the instance of the Procurator-Fiscal of the Eastern District of Stirlingshire, and that the Sheriff has fixed Monday the Twenty-first day of April current, at Ten o'clock forenoon, within the Sheriff's Chambers, Bank Street, Falkirk, for taking evidence of the condition of the said Robert Love, with a view to his ultimate disposal in terms of the Statute 4th and 5th Vict., cap. 60.

JOHN GAIR, Procurator-Fiscal.

Falkirk. 16th April, 1856.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 24th April, 1st, 8th, May 1856

EXTENSIVE SALE OF HEAVY LARCH AND SAUGH WOOD, &c. AT MUIRAVONSIDE,

On Saturday the 10th May. To be Sold by Public Roup, on Saturday the 10th day of May, 1856, on the Estate of Muiravonside, about two miles west from Linlithgow, upwards of 400 HEAVY LARCH TREES, many of them containing from 30 to 40 feet of wood; also, a few Lots of SCOTCH and SPRUCE FIR, and SAUGH WOOD, of Large Dimensions; likewise, a quantity of PIT WOOD. The whole to be Sold in Lots, and Four Months' Credit on Bills, or Discount for Cash. The wood is situated within half-a-mile of the Union Canal and Slamanan Railway.

Roup to begin at Muiravonside Eastern Approach, near Causewayend, at 12 o clock noon.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Glasgow Herald Monday 12th, 26th, May, 2nd, June 1856

NOTICE.

INTIMATION IS HEREBY GIVEN, That DAVID CARRICK ROBERT CARRICK BUCHANAN, of Drumpeller, Esquire, Heir of Entail in possession of the Lands - of Middle Blairlin, and various other Lands and Heritages situated in the counties of Lanark, Stirling, Linlithgow, and Dumbarton, commonly known as the Lands and Estate of Drumpeller, has presented a Petition to the Court of Session, (First Division, Mr. Walker, Clerk,) in terms of the Act 11th and 12th Victoria, cap. 36, entitled "An Act for the Amendment of the Law of Entail in Scotland," and of the Act 16th and 17th Victoria, cap. 94, entituled "An Act to Extend the Benefits of the Act of the 11th and 12th years of her present Majesty, for the Amendment of the Law of Entail in Scotland," for authority to DISENTAIL and acquire in fee-simple the Lands of Bogo, Bogohaugh, Dalquarnhaugh, Bogoknows,  Loanend, and others, part of said Entailed Lands and Estate, lying in the Parishes of Muiravonside and Slamannan and County of Stirling, and particularly described in the said Petition: On which Petition Lord Curriehill, Ordinary officiating on the Bills, has pronounced the following Interlocutor: " Edinburgh, 22d April, 1856. -The Lord Ordinary officiating on the Bills appoints this Petition to be intimated on the walls of the Bill chamber and in the Minute Book for Fourteen Days, and to be served on the persons for whom it prays for an order for service to be made, and them to answer the same, ' if advised so to do, within the proper periods, in terms of the  Statute and relative Acts of Sederunt; and appoints the same to be publicly advertised, once in the Edinburgh Gazette, and once weekly for six successive weeks in the North British Advertiser and Glasgow Herald Newspapers. (Signed) "JOHN MARSHALL."

WALKER & MELVILLE, W.S.,  Petitioner's Agents.

Edinburgh, 110 George Street,

25th April, 1856.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 26th June 1856

TEACHER WANTED, AN UNMARRIED MAN, for Avonbridge School.

Application to be made, on or before 8th July, to Mr James Bell, Preses, Avonbridge, by Falkirk.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 10th July 1856

TEACHER WANTED, AN UNMARRIED MAN, for Avonbridge School.

Application to be made, on or before15th July, to Mr James Bell, Preses, Avonbridge, by Falkirk.

 

 

Glasgow Herald, 11th 15th, 22nd, 29th August, 5th, 26th September, 6th,10th, 13th October 1856

Advertisements & Notices

FARMS FOR SALE, FORMING A DESIRABLE SMALL ESTATE.

TO BE SOLD, BY PRIVATE BARGAIN,

THE FARMS of BOGO and LOANEND, containing 267 Acres, 2 Roods, and 21 Poles, Imperial measure, or thereby, situated at Avon Bridge, four miles from Falkirk, viz.:-

1st, BOGO, containing 180 Acres, 6 Poles Arable, and 45 Acres, 3 Roods, 12 Poles occupied by Roads, Fences, Feus, Moss, Pasture, and Farm Steading,-altogether, 219 Acres, I Rood, 29 Poles, situated in the Parish of Muiravonside, and County of Linlithgow. This is a very desirable Farm, having the Avon Water for its south boundary, the Slamannan Railway passing through the centre of the Farm, and the road to Falkirk passing the east end of it. It is susceptible of great improvement, and contains some very fine land of the Banks of the Avon. The Steading was nearly all rebuilt a few years since.

2nd, LOANEND, containing 41 Acres, 3 Roods, 3 Poles, Imperial measure, situated in the parish of Slamannan and County of Stirling. This Farm is altogether Arable, and lies very compact, being nearly square, and having the Avon Water for- its north boundary, and the road from Airdrie and Slamannan on the south. It is very seldom so desirable a small Estate is in the market, and it is only proposed to be Sold or Excambed for a Property the Proprietor can acquire nearer his other Estates.

Offers in writing will be received by Mr. Henderson, Union Bank, Coatbridge, who will give any further particulars  required; or G. Fyffe Christie, Writer, 24 Gordon Street, Glasgow,with whom are the Title Deed of the Farms.

9th August, 1856.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 14th August 1856

SHERIFF CRIMINAL COURT. On Friday last the following cases were disposed of before Sir John Hay, Bart., Sheriff-Substitute of Stirlingshire, The following cases were disposed of at the instance of John Gair, Esq., Procurator-Fiscal, Falkirk ,

PLACING AN OBSTRUCTION ON A RAILWAY.

 John Anderson was charged with a contravention of 3d and 4th Victoria, cap. section 15, inasmuch as on Tuesday the 24th of June last, he did wilfully and unlawfully, or maliciously and recklessly, place and leave railway-chair of cast iron upon the Bathgate Branch of the Monkland Railway, at a part which passes by the lands of Kaemuir, Muiravonside, a short distance to the north of the viaduct over the river Avon, in a manner calculated to obstruct a locomotive engine and tender, with a passenger carriage attached thereto. The indictment goes on to specify the names of the gentlemen and others occupying such passenger carriage, and how the engine or tender came in contact with said railway chair and broke it, whereby the engine was obstructed and the lives of said persons endangered. The prisoner pleaded guilty to the statutory offence and was sentenced to receive 36 stripes, and to be imprisoned for two months' with hard labour; or three months' imprisonment.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 28th August, 4th, 18th 25th September 1856

MILLS TO BE LET,

For Seven, Ten, or Fifteen Years.

Entry at Martinmas next.

THE FLOUR, BARLEY, and CORN MILLS of MANUEL, Parish of Muiravonside, and County of Stirling, as presently possessed by Mr. Brock. They are situated upon the Water of Avon, within two miles of Linlithgow and six of Falkirk ; have a plentiful supply of Water, and being in the neighbourhood of the Edinburgh and Glasgow, and Slamannan and Bo'ness Railways, and the Union Canal, command ready access to the best Markets. There is also a suitable Dwelling-House and Offices. If wished, a Tenant can be accommodated with any quantity of ground, not exceeding 55 Acres Imperial, of the best quality, and suitable for all kinds of crops.

Offers to be lodged with Mr. Glen, Writer, Linlithgow, or MACTITCHIE & BAYLEY, and HENDERSON., W.S., 11, Royal Exchange, Edinburgh, betwixt and the 1st of October next, and to whom application may be made for further particulars.

N.B. - The present Tenant is not to be an offerer, and the Proprietor is not bound to accept the highest offer.

Edinburgh, 25th August, 1856.

 

 

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 11th September 1856

Births

At Compston, Muiravonside, on the 8th instant, Mrs. JAMES CLARK, of a son.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 18th  September 1856

COUNTY OF STIRLING. VALUATION OF LANDS AND HERITAGES. STATUTE 17 and 18 VICT., CAP. 91.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That ADJOURNED COURTS will be held for HEARING APPEALS against the VALUATIONS made by the ASSESSOR, under the above-mentioned Statute, at the times and places undermentioned, viz. :—

At FALKIRK, within the Crown Inn there, upon Monday the 29th instant, Half-past 11 o'Clock Forenoon, for the Parishes of FALKIRK, POLMONT, LARBERT, MUIRAVONSIDE, AIRTH, and BOTHKENNAR, SLAMANAN.

ROB. CAMPBELL, Assessor.

17th Sept., 1856.

 

Falkirk Herald 18th September 1856

CUPID IN THE DETECTIVE FORCE. –

On Friday last two rustic swains, in love with two country belles residing at a farm near Avonbridge, after the expiry of the day proceeded to the farm in order to spend a few hours of the night in the company of the expecting maidens. While watching for the preconcerted signal which was to inform them of the coast being clear, - in other words, of the 'auld folks' being off to bed; the enamoured youths espied another young man coming with "Tarquin's ravishing strides " towards the farm. Thinking that the approaching stranger might be a rival, and wishing him in a certain warm region at the antipodes, they concealed themselves in order to watch his proceedings. The third party, however, had "metal more attractive" in his mind's eye than the maidens of the farm, and was in search of a gratification less sentimental in its character than a two hours' loving conversation; for, instead of tapping at the kitchen window or tirrling at the pin of the kitchen door, in token of his desire to be admitted, he proceeded at once to the dairy, which he forcibly entered, and, taking possession of four cheeses, "revisited the glimpses of the moon" with his prize. The concealed lovers, who. doubtless, were but too happy in discovering that the stranger preferred the farmer's cheeses to his handmaidens, gave the alarm, and the thief dropt his booty. Information having been given to Mr. Gair, Procurator-Fiscal, the thief himself was secured on the following morning, and now lies in jail waiting his trial.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 30th October 1856

OATS, BEANS, HORSES, MILCH COWS, THRASHING-MILL, AND FARM IMPLEMENTS,

 At Kendie's Hill, Muiravonside. On MONDAY, the 3d November, 1556. Wm. GILLESPIE, Auctioneer, begs respectfully to intimate that he has been instructed to Sell by Public Roup, at Kendie's Hill, Parish of Muiravonside, on Monday the 3d November, 1856, the whole CROP and FARM STOCKING, comprising

24 Stacks of Oats.

9 do. Beans.

1 do. Straw.

3 Draught Mares, two of which are supposed to be in Foal.

1 Draught Horse.

1 Two-year-old Colt.

1 Milch Cow.

2 Two-year-old Queys in Calf.

3 One-year-old Queys.

2 One-year-old Stots.

1 One-year-old Bull.

1 Calf. 2 Iron Ploughs.

2 Pair of Grain Harrows.

1 Grubber and Bulking Plough.

1 Stone Roller.

2 Boilers and Furnaces.

1 Pair of Hand Fanners.

1 Corn Chest.

2 Sets of Cart and Plough Harness.

2 Riding Saddles and Bridle.

1 Churn.

And a great variety of Dairy Utensils and Farming Implements.

Also, A THREE-HORSE THRASHING MACHINE, in good order, and

2 ½ ACRES of YELLOW TURNIPS.

Usual Credit given.

Sale to commence at Eleven o'clock forenoon.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 6th November 1856

SHERIFF JURY TRIALS. On Monday last the following cases were tried before Sheriff Robertson and a Jury, at the instance of Robert Sconce, Esq., Procurator Fiscal:

THEFT HOUSEBREAKING.

 John Walker, charged with having, on 13th September last, broken into outhouse at Avonbridge, parish of Slamannan, Stirlingshire, occupied by Robert Marshall, and with stealing therefrom four cheeses, pleaded not guilty. Evidence having been led, and the declaration of the prisoner read, he was, by a plurality of voices, found not guilty, and was accordingly discharged from the bar.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 6th November 1856

STIRLING SHERIFF AND JURY TRIALS.

 The following cases, at the instance of the Fiscals at Stirling and Falkirk, were disposed of before Mr. Sheriff Robertson and a Jury, at Stirling, on Monday last :-

2. John Walker, charged with theft of four cheeses, by housebreaking, at Avonbridge; pled not guilty, and after evidence was led, the jury by a majority found the libel not proven, and the panel was dismissed from the bar.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 6th November 1856

WANTED AT MARTINMAS,

A BOY about 16 years of age, to take charge of a Horse and Gig, work in the Garden, and make himself generally useful. –

Apply to Mr. GRAHAM, Redford, Muiravonside.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 20th November 1856

FARM TO LET, IN THE PARISH OF MUIRAVONSIDE.

To be Let for 19 years, THE FARM OF CANDYEND and HOWLOAN, Belonging to the Kirk Session of Muiravonside, containing about 40 imperial acres.

All necessary particulars will be learned and offers received at Craigend House ; or by Messrs RUSSELL & AITKEN, Falkirk, up to 5th December Next.

Falkirk, 18th Nov., 1856.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 20th November 1856

HUNTING APPOINTMENTS.

The Stirlingshire harriers will meet on Saturday next at Larbert, on Tuesday the 25th at Avonbridge, and on Friday the 28th at Dunipace Bridge - each day at eleven o'clock.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 27th November, 4th December 1856

SALE OF CROP AND FARM STOCKING, &c AT CANDYEND.

To be Sold by Public Roup, by a Warrant from the Sheriff, on Saturday the 6th day of December, 1856, on the Farm of Candyend, in the Parish of Muiravonside. possessed by Mr. John Nimmo,

 THE whole CROP, MILCH COWS, CATTLE, FARMING IMPLEMENTS, and HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE on the above Farm, comprising –

9 Stacks of Oats,

4 Stacks of Beans,

A quantity of Barley Straw, Thrashed Barley, and Barley Dust,

3 Milch Cows,

2 Calves,

1 Grey Draught Filly,

1 Cart with Wheels and Axle,

2 Ploughs,

Stone Roller and Frame,

Cart and Plough Horse Harness,

A Pair of Barn Fanners,

A Thrashing Floor,

A Cheese Press;

Also, Spades, Shovels, Grapes, Tubs, Pails, Riding Saddle and Bridle, Boiler and Furnace,

3 Bags of Potatoes, an Iron Axle, Stack Ladder and other small Farm Implements,

Dairy Utensils, &c; a Stack of Peats, and a quantity of Stable and Byre Manure.

Likewise, The whole HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE, viz.,

Eightday Clock.

Chest of Drawers,

Beds and Bedding,

Chairs, Tables, and other Household Furniture, &c. &c.

Ready Cash.

Roup to begin at 12 o'clock noon.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 27th November 1856

ASSESSED TAXES, 1856.

APPEAL COURTS, COUNTY OF STIRLING.

THE Commissioners of Supply for the several Districts of the County of Stirling will meet, on the days, and at the places undermentioned, to hear and determine Appeals against the charges made by the Surveyor for the current year :—

For the Burgh and Parish of Falkirk, and the Parishes of Airth, Bothkennar, Larbert, Muiravonside, Polmont, and Slamannan —in the Court-House, Falkirk, Thursday the 11th of December next, Twelve o'Clock Noon.

 

 

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 27th November 1856

RETURNS OF BIRTHS, DEATHS, AND MARRIAGES.

During the third, or summer, quarter of 1856, there were registered in Scotland 24,593 births, 12.849 deaths, and 4488 marriages; being, for the estimated population, at the annual rate of one birth in every 30, one death in every 59, and one marriage in every 169 persons.

BIRTHS. 24,593 births were registered during the quarter ending 30th September, 1856, being an increase of 744 above those of the corresponding quarter of the previous year; but a diminution to the extent of 2227 as compared with the births registered during the second quarter of this year. Allowing for increase of population, the births were in the annual proportion of 324 births to every 10,000, or one birth to every 30 persons living. This proportion varied greatly in the different counties; being so low us 265 and 281 births to every 10,000 persons in the almost stationary populations of the North-Western and Northern counties; whilst it was so high as 408 births to every 10.000 persons among the manufacturing and rapidly increasing population of the South-Western counties. Of the individual counties, the lowest proportion of births occurred in Orkney, and the highest proportion in Linlithgow, being in the proportion of only 222 births in every 10,000 of the population in Orkney, but in Linlithgow in the high proportion of 444 births, according to the census of 1851, or allowing for increase of population 419 births for every 10,000 persons. The difference between the proportion of births in the town and country districts of Scotland is not less striking. In 138 town districts, embracing all the populous towns, and containing, according to the census of 1851, nearly an exact half of the population of Scotland, there were registered during the quarter, 13,576 births, being in the proportion of 376 births for every 10.000, or one birth for every 26 persons; whereas in the 870 rural districts, with an equal population, the births amounted to 11,017, being in the proportion of 305 births to every 10,000, or one birth to every 32 persons. The births in the town districts thus exceeded those in the rural districts by 2559. Of the 24.593 births, 12.578 were males, and 12.015 females. 8638 of these births were registered during July ; 7934 during August; and 7971 during September.

DEATHS. 12,849 deaths were registered during the quarter ending 30th September, a number lower by 139 than the deaths registered during the corresponding quarter of the previous year, and 1791 lower than those of the second quarter of the current year. Allowing for increase of population, this would give the annual proportion of 169 deaths in every 10.000, or one death in every 59 persons - a lower proportion than appears ever to have been attained in England, since the registration act came into operation in 1837. The proportion of deaths in the different counties corresponded closely with that of the births, being lowest in those counties in which the births were fewest, and highest in those in which the births were most numerous. The difference between the rate of mortality in the town and rural districts is very striking. In the 138 town districts, which include all the large towns, and embrace one half of the population of Scotland, the deaths numbered 7997 during the quarter, while in the rural districts, with an equal population, they only amounted to 4852,. In other words, the populations in the towns died during the quarter at the annual rate of 221 out of every 10.000, or one death in every 45 persons; while in the country, the population only died at the rate of 134 out of every 10,000, or one death in every 74 persons. The excess of deaths, therefore, in the town districts, during the quarter, amounted to 3145. Of the 12 849 persons who died, 6578 were males, and 6271 females. 4405 of the deaths were registered during July; 4201 during August; and 4243 during September.

INCREASE OF POPULATION. As the births amounted to 24,593, and the deaths to 12.849, the natural increase of the population from births alone amounted, during the quarter, to 11.744 persons. From this number has to be deducted the number of persons who emigrated during the quarter. It is not known how many have emigrated to England, but from a return furnished to the Registrar-General by the Emigration Commissioners, it appears that during the quarter, there emigrated from the ports at which there are government emigration offices, 50,228 persons, of whom 3069 were Scotch ; and adding the proportion of those whose nativity was not ascertained, viz., 422, the number of emigrants amounted to 3491, thus showing the actual increase of population, during the quarter, to have been 8253 persons. MARRIAGES. 4488 marriages were registered during the third quarter, being in the annual proportion of 59 marriages to every 10,000 of the estimated population, or one marriage to every 169 persons. The marriages thus exceed by 295 those of the corresponding quarter of the previous year, but fall 695 below those of the second quarter of the current year. The habits of the people in the various counties have great influence on the proportion of marriages during the different quarters. Thus, during the third quarter of the year, a considerable proportion of the young men of the Northern and North-Western Counties are absent at the herring and other fishings, or in search of work in the more Southern Counties, and do not contract marriage till their return for the winter; hence the proportion of marriages in these counties, during the quarter, is very low. Of the 4488 marriages, 1866 were registered during July 1363 during August and 1269 during September. The disparity between the proportion of marriages in the town and rural districts was much greater during the third quarter than was that of the births or deaths. Thus, of the 4188 marriages, 3087 occurred in the 138 town districts, while only 1401 occurred in the rural districts, though containing an equal population. It thus appears, that during the quarter, more than two marriages were contracted among the inhabitants of towns for every one contracted among the rural population. Comparing this fact with the previous returns, it will be seen that it is among the rural population that the fluctuations in the quarterly number of marriages chiefly occur; while in the towns, the proportions during the several quarters remain much more steady. HEALTH OF THE POPULATION. The health of the population has, as a whole, been most satisfactory during the quarter, and has reached a lower percentage than is believed ever to have been attained among the inhabitants of a large country like Scotland, where at least one-half of the population is congregated in towns. Once only since the Registration Act came into operation in England, viz., during the third quarter of 1845. did the mortality there reach the low proportion of 176 deaths in every 10.000 persons; but during the third quarter of the current year, the mortality in Scotland reached the very low proportion of 169 deaths in every 10,000 of the population; while, for the rural districts, it was only in the proportion of 134 deaths in the same number of persons. The Registrars' notes must, however, satisfy every one that even this proportion might be reduced, seeing that the complete absence of all sanitary arrangements in the dwellings of the rural population - their undrained cottages being surrounded by every kind of pestiferous nuisance - at present encourages the outbreak and spread of typhus fever and other epidemics, and thus largely increases the mortality. A mild form of typhus and gastric fever has prevailed pretty extensively over some districts in the northern and north-western counties. In other respects, these counties have been wonderfully free from disease of all kinds. Small-pox has appeared here and there, chiefly in over-crowded localities, and where the sanitary arrangements were defective. After the conclusive evidence, which has been again and again furnished, relative to the protecting powers of vaccination against that loathsome disease, it is surprising that parents do not protect their children against its ravages by having them vaccinated. Several of the registrars append to their returns notes bearing on this point. Thus, the registrar of St Nicholas District, Aberdeen, remarks, that "during the quarter there have been 24 deaths from small-pox, in all of which cases, with one or two exceptions, the persons had not been vaccinated." The registrar of Old Kilpatrick, in Dumbartonshire, states that "five children, all under eight years of age, have died from small-pox, and that they were not vaccinated." The registrar of Kirkmichael, in the county of Ayr, remarks, of the deaths from small-pox, that "None of the deceased were vaccinated, adding, that "When vaccination has been attended to, the cases have been of a milder type. Scarlet fever, which was so prevalent in the southern and south-eastern counties during the second quarter, has, to a great extent, disappeared. But it seems to have broken out afresh in some districts of the south eastern counties, or in others to which it had not previously extended. The great focus of the disease, if such a phrase may be used, has been, and continues to be, the towns of Edinburgh and Leith; though, generally speaking, the disease is not of such a virulent type as when it first made its appearance. Hooping-cough is noticed as having appeared here and there over the country, but generally of a mild type. Glasgow seems to have suffered more from that disease than any other locality.

WEATHER. The weather during the quarter may be generally characterized as having been cold and wet, with few warm summer days. The south-west of Scotland and certain districts in the northern parts of the island have proved exceptions to this remark. The mean temperature of the quarter has been below the average, having, over Scotland, given a mean of only 54° 8 Fahr. This defect was most remarkable in July and September, the mean temperature of July having only reached 56° 4. while that of September was only 50° 9. The rain-fall also was in excess during the quarter, amounting to no less than 10.65 inches in depth, as the mean for Scotland. The month of September, usually a tolerably dry month, gave a mean of no less than 4.64 inches of rain. The barometer was, over Scotland, rather lower than the average of the quarter, indicating a mean of 29.849 inches. This weather, however hurtful it may have proved to the crops, seems not to have acted injuriously on the human frame, as the population was never healthier then during the past quarter. The following are the numbers of the births, deaths, and marriages in the towns and parishes of our district

Births. Deaths. Marriages.

Muiravonside                    28           6             3

Polmont                              28           9             2

Slamannan                         39          10           2

Torphichen                          9            1            4

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 11th December 1856

SHERIFF AND JURY TRIALS.

The following cases, at the instance of the Procurator- Fiscal at Falkirk, were disposed of before Sir John Hay, Sheriff-Substitute, at Stirling, on Friday last : -

1. James Smith, a watchmaker, or repairer of watches, lately residing at Loan of Muiravonside, charged with theft of three watches entrusted to him to repair, &c, aggravated by previous conviction; pleaded guilty, and was sentenced to eight months' imprisonment.

2. Edward Reid, from Crownerland, in Muiravonside, charged with theft of two silver watches from the farm steading of Greenwells; pleaded guilty, and was sentenced to four months' imprisonment.

THE HOUNDS.

The Linlithgow and Stirlingshire foxhounds will meet on Thursday (to-day) at Dalmahoy, and on Saturday the 13th at Champfleurie - each morning at a quarter before eleven o'clock. The Stirlingshire harriers will meet at Linlithgow Bridge on Wednesday the 17th, and at Avonbridge on Friday the 19th - each day at eleven o'clock.

STORM.

On Tuesday night there was a severe storm of wind, which lasted from about seven P.M. until an early hour on Wednesday morning. Since the storm of February last, which left so many traces of its vengeance over the entire country, we have not heard such a loud wind. Beyond the knocking down of a few tiles and chimney cans, we have not heard of any damage having been done by it.

DEATHS.

Suddenly, at Wester Strath, Avon-Bridge, on the 8th inst., John infant son of John Smith, inspector Bathgate Railway.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 11th December 1856

SHERIFF CRIMINAL TRIALS.

The following cases were tried on Friday last before Sir John Hay, Bart., Sheriff-substitute, at the instance of John Gair, Esq., Procurator Fiscal, Falkirk :—

THEFT AND PREVIOUS CONVICTION,

James Smith, a watchmaker, was charged with having, in the month of September last, theftuously taken away a silver watch, a guard chain of German silver, two watch keys and a seal, which had been entrusted to him for repair by Margaret Bryce, daughter of John Bryce, mason, residing at Laurieston, parish of Falkirk ; also with having, in the above month, appropriated in similar manner a silver watch, a braid chain and watch key, the property of James Kay, farm servant; further, with having, in the above month, appropriated silver watch, steel chain and watch key, the property of Alex. Baird, mason, residing at Maddiston, parish of Muiravonside. The prisoner pleaded guilty, and was sentenced to eight months' imprisonment.

AGENT—Mr. Mathie.

THEFT.

Edward Reid was accused of having, on 16th October last, feloniously stolen a silver watch, a guard chain of German silver, a watch key, and a shell, from a stable loft at Greenwells, parish of Polmont, Stirlingshire, occupied by William Neilson, farmer, and the property of William Nisbet, a servant to Mr. Neilson; also with having stolen a silver watch, a guard chain of German silver, and three watch keys, the property of John Hynd, servant to the said William Neilson. The prisoner pleaded guilty, and was sentenced to four months' imprisonment, one of these with hard labour.

AGENT— Mr. Mathie.

 

 

1857

 

Falkirk Herald 22nd January 1857

THE HUNT. –

The Stirlingshire Harriers will meet on Tuesday the 27th at Laurieston, and on Friday the 30th at Maddiston Kennel each morning at 11 o'clock

 

Falkirk Herald, Glasgow Herald 29th January, 2nd, 12th, 16th, 26th February, 5th, 19th, 26th March 1857

FARMS AND HOUSE PROPERTY IN STIRLINGSHIRE TO BE SOLD.

To be Sold by Public Roup, upon Thursday the 5th day of March, 1857, within the Red Lion Inn, Falkirk, at. Two o'clock afternoon, if not previously Sold by Private Bargain, -

Lot I THOSE PARTS (Ist) of the LANDS of CROSSRIG. (2d) of EADIE of SHARPSBANK'S PROPERTY. (3d) of the ALLOCATION of the MUIR of MUIRAVONSIDE, and (4th) the PARTS of the LANDS of HILLEND, - the whole being now conjoined and known by the general name of GREENCRAIG, extending to 65 Imperial acres or thereby, conform to plan and measurement thereof by Alexander Black, Land Surveyor in Falkirk, in 1849. This property lyes in the parish of Muiravonside and county of Stirling, and is presently occupied by Mr. Andrew Baird.

Lot II. Those PARTS of the LANDS of CASTLERANKINE, in the parish of Denny and county aforesaid, known by the general name of FISHERACRE, presently possessed by Mr. William Nicol, and extending, conform to measurement thereof by the said Alexander Black in 1857, to 50 Imperial acres or thereby. Both these Properties are presently under Lease to substantial Tenants, and will be parted with at prices on which the rents payable will yield a handsome return to the Purchaser.

Lot III. These HOUSES and GARDEN situated at the entry from Carron Road to Mungal-Mill presently occupied by James Walker, change-keeper, and other Tenants. The situation of this Property, which nearly adjoins Carron Works, readily secures Tenants for it at good rents.

Farther particulars will be learned on application to Mr. John Boyd, 17, Gordon Street, Glasgow; or Messrs RUSSELL & AITKEN, Falkirk.

 

Falkirk Herald 5th February 1857

THE HARRIERS. –

The Stirlingshire harriers meet at Laurieston Kennel on Tuesday, and at Maddiston on Friday - each morning at 11 o'clock.

 

Falkirk Herald 19th,26th February, 5th March 1857

GRASS PARKS TO LET.

To be Let, for Pasture for the ensuing Season, on Monday the 2nd day of March next.

SEVERAL GRASS FIELDS of the Property of MANUEL, Parish of Muiravonside, consisting of: -

A.           D,

1. The Lawn to the East and South of House,                        13               0

2. Park behind Entry-head,                                                          2            374

3. South division of Hillend, in Young Grass,                           4             668

4. North division of do., next Public Road,                             2             424

5. Pond Park, Causewayend, Young Grass                              4             215

Park West of do.,                                                                         5             157

9             372

6. Park West of South division of Railway Station,               4             563

Roup to begin at Entryhead, at One o'clock afternoon.

 JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

16th February, 1857.

 

Caledonian Mercury Tuesday 24th February 1857

HUNTING APPOINTMENTs.

The Stirlingshire harriers meet to-day at Linlithgow; and on Friday, 27th, at Avonbridge-each morning at 11 o'clock.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 12th 19th 26th March 1857

TO LET, THE MILL at STRATHMILL, near Avonbridge, for such a number of Years as may be agreed on; Entry at Whitsunday. - Apply to the Proprietor.

 

Caledonian Mercury 17th March 1857

PROVINCIAL  INTELLIGENCE

Hunting Appointments –

The Stirlingshire harriers meet to-day at Denny and on Saturday, 21, at Maddiston - at eleven o'clock morning.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 26th March 1857

DEATHS

At Ridgehead, Muiravonside, on the 20th inst., aged ninety-one years, AGNES RUSSELL, relict of the late Mr. John Waddell.

 

Falkirk Herald 30th April 1857

TERRIER FOUND.

FOUND on the 17th inst., at Polmont Station, a small BLACK TERRIER DOG, with a Silver Collar and Brass padlock around its neck. The owner may have the Dog on paying expenses. - Apply to Alexander Dick, Maddiston Quarry, by Linlithgow.

 

Falkirk Herald 30th April 7th 14th May 1857

FEMALE SERVANT WANTED.

WANTED, a FEMALE SERVANT between 30 and 40 years of age, to attend to cows, poultry, &c, and to work out of doors when required. She will have for remuneration a comfortable house rent free, with coals, and 5s per week.- Apply, personally, at Gowanbank, by Avonbridge, or at the Herald Office here. None need apply unless satisfactorily recommended.

 

Glasgow Herald Monday 4th, 18th  May 1857

COUNTRY HOUSE TO LET (FOR THE SUMMER SEASON)

THE MANSIONHOUSE OF TORAVON, with a good walled GARDEN of about a Quarter of an Acre, excellent OFFICES, with STABLING for Four Horses, and PASTURE of the LAWN round the House, if desired. The House, which is of modern architecture, is well Furnished, and contains Three Public Rooms, Six Bed Rooms, with Dressing Room, besides Kitchen, Laundry, and Servants' accommodation. The situation, on the ridge of the Muiravonside Hills, is one possessing great advantages as a healthy Residence, and commands extensive Views over a beautiful surrounding country, and the opposite shores of the Firth of Forth. The Polmont Station of the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway,to and from which there are constant Trains in communication with Edinburgh, Glasgow, and the North, is distant less than two miles, the town of Linlithgow four, and the town of Falkirk five miles. The distance from Edinburgh by the Road is 21 miles. The Parish Church of Muiravonside is within three-quarters of a mile, and the Free Church of Polmont District within one and a half miles.

Orders to view the House will be obtained on application to T. H. Ferrier, W.S., No. 95 George Street, Edinburgh.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 11th ,18th June 1857

EXTENSIVE SALE OF SMITH'S TOOLS, MALLEABLE IRON, &c.

To be Sold by Public Roup, at Whitrcross, in the Parish of Muiravonside, (2 ½ miles west from Linlithgow), on Monday the 22d June current, THE WHOLE STOCK-IN-TRADE belonging to Mr. George Wilson, Blacksmith, and comprising 4 pairs Bellows - 2 of them nearly new, 4 Anvils, 3 Vices in excellent order, a Press Drill with Cast-steel Bits to suit, a Cress Block, a Turning Lathe - 7-inch heads, a powerful Screw Punching Machine, Wheel Shoeing Plate and Skeathing Furnace, 60 superior Screw Tops and Plates, a set Dies, 40 Bolt and Rivet Borers, Cast-steel Punches and Mandrils, 12 Top and Bottom Cresses, 6 Flatteners, Handled Punches and Chisels, 5 Fore and 12 Hand Hammers, 2 sets Horseshoeing Tools. Docking Shears, Beam and Weights, Files and Rasps, about 1-1/2 cwt. Horse Nails, 40 pairs Tongs, Plough Mounting, including Sibs, Reists, and Sides, a quantity of Cast and Blister Steel, about 3 Tons Malleable Iron of all sizes, 3 Tons Scrap Iron, besides all the other Tools used in a large Implement Manufactory. The whole to be sold off without reserve, as the proprietor is leaving the place. Sale to commence at Eleven o'clock forenoon. TERMS CASH. ROBERT SANDERSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 16thJuly 1857

NOTICE.

THE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING of the Eastern District of Stirlingshire Agricultural Association will be held in my Office, Wilson's Buildings, on Thursday the 23d July, 1857, at One o'clock P.M.

 WILLIAM GILLESPIE, Secy.

 NOTICE.

INTENDING COMPETITORS for the Prizes to be awarded by the Eastern District of Stirlingshire Agricultural Association, for the Best Kept Cottages, and Gardens connected there with, occupied by Farm Servants in the parishes of Polmont and Muiravonside, are requested to give in their names without further delay to the Secretary, William Gillespie, Wilsons Buildings, Falkirk, as the gentlemen appointed are just about to commence their inspection.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 16th, 30th  July 1857

FARM TO BE LET.

To be Let for such period as may be agreed on, with Entry at Martinmas 1857, THE FARM of CRAIGMAD, in the Parish of Muiravonside and County of Stirling, as presently possessed by Mr. John Shanks, to which there is intended to be added the Fields of Blackbraes Farm, lying between Mr. Shanks' possession and the public road from Falkirk to Avonbridge. This Farm adjoins the extensive Collieries in the West end of the Parish of Muiravonside; and from this circumstance, as well as by the adjoining Railway, Manure is readily procured for it, and the Farm Produce easily disposed of. A considerable part of the Farm has recently been drained with Tiles, and every reasonable encouragement will be given by the Landlord for drainage and similar improvements.

Further particulars will be learned on application to Russel & Aitken, Writers in Falkirk.

The present Tenant voluntarily leaves the Farm, and will not be an Offerer for it.

Falkirk, 13th July, 1857.

 

 

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 20th August 1857

CROP AND FARM STOCKING FOR SALE.

To be Sold by Public Roup, on Friday the 28th Aug., 1857, at Craigmad, Muiravonside, possessed by Mr. John Shanks,

THE CROP and STOCKING on the above Farm, consisting of

15 Acres of Oats.

200 Stones of Hay,

a quantity of growing Potatoes, and a Field of Barley ;

 3 Milch Cows,

3 Queys in Calf,

1 one-year-old Quey,

1 Calf, I Draught Horse,

1 Pig,

2 Close-bodied Carts,

1 Iron Plough,

Harrows, Cheese-Stone, Harness, Boiler, and a variety of Dairy and Farm Utensils.

Sale to begin at Eleven o'clock forenoon.

USUAL CREDIT WILL BE GIVEN.

WILLIAM CHRISTIE, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald 3rd & 10th September 1857

WANTED, A Good Steady JOURNEYMAN BLACKSMITH. -  Apply at Maddiston Smithy

 

Falkirk Herald 8th October 1857

STIRLINGSHIRE HARRIERS.-

Owing to the Falkirk Tryst being held on Tuesday next week, the harriers will meet on Wednesday the 14th at Avonbridge, and on Saturday the 17th at the Kennel, Laurieston - each morning at half-past 10 o'clock.

REPORT of the COMMITTEE of the EASTERN DISTRICT of STIRLINGSHIRE AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION, appointed to Award the COTTAGE PREMIUMS given by the ASSOCIATION for the BEST KEPT COTTAGES in the Parishes of Polmont and Muiravonside.

The Committee appointed to Award the Premiums given by the EASTERN DISTRICT of STIRLINGSHIRE AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION for the BEST KEPT COTTAGES and GARDENS in the Parishes of Polmont and Muiravonside, having been furnished with a List of the Competitors for said Premiums, proceeded to inspect the several Cottages and Gardens (eleven in number), and, after a very careful and minute inspection of the whole, unanimously adjudged the Premiums as follows, viz.: -

1. MATHEW DICK. Grange.

2. JAMES CRAWFORD, Bowhouse.

3. JAMES DRUMMOND,Carronflats.

4. ANDREW SCOTT, Maddiston.

5. GEORGE HILL, Grange.

6. DAVID GRAHAM. Bowhouse.

7. JESSIE DONALDSON, Little Kerse.

 The Committee have much pleasure in reporting the satisfaction they felt in the discharge of their duty, from the very excellent state of keeping of the Cottages of the Competitors; at same time, while much pleased with the Cottages inside, they regretted to find that there is generally less attention paid to the outward decoration than is desirable, either on the ground of amenity or health. They recommend that, in offering Premiums in future, a special reference be made to this matter.

By Order, WILLIAM GILLESPIE, Secretary.

 

Falkirk Herald 22nd 29th October 1857

MUIRAVONSIDE MORTSAFE.

THE MEMBERS of the MORTSAFE ASSOCIATION in Muiravonside are requested to meet in the Parish Schoolhouse, Muiravonside, at half-past Six on Friday the 30th October.

WILLIAM JOHNSTON, Secretary.

 

Falkirk Herald 29th October, 5th November 1857

CROP, HORSES, MILCH COWS. CATTLE, POTATOES, TURNIPS, FARMING IMPLEMENTS, HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE, &c &c, AT GLENHEAD, On TUESDAY' the 3d November.

To be Sold by Public Roup, on Tuesday the 3d day of November, 1857, on the Farm of GLENHEAD, on the Estate of Craigend, possessed by Mr. John Neilson,

THE WHOLE CROP, DRAUGHT HORSES, MILCH COWS. QUEYS. CATTLE, FARMING IMPLEMENTS, HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE, and other Effects upon the above Farm, comprising –

9 Stacks of Oats.

4 Stacks of Barley.

2 Capital Draught Mares.

2 Famous Milch Cows.

4 Ayrshire Queys.

2 Six quarter-old Ayrshire Bulls.

1 Bull Calf.

Pig, Six months old - fat.

3 Excellent Close-bodied Carts.

2 Iron Ploughs.

1 Iron Scraping Plough.

1 Pair of Grain and

1 Pair of Grass-seed Harrows.

1 Pair of Iron Drill Harrows.

1 Turnip Sowing Machine, Double Sowing.

2 Stone Rollers with Iron Frames.

3 Sets of Cart and Plough Horse Harness.

13 Stone and Fire-Brick Troughs for Cattle.

1 Pair of Improved Hand-Fanners.

A Pair of Bellows and Anvil.

With the whole of the small Farming Implements and Dairy Utensils, &c. &c. Also, the

HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE, viz.: -

A Chest of Mahogany Drawers,

6 Stuff-bottomed Chairs,

an Eight-day Clock,

Mahogany Table,

Tent Bedstead and Curtains,

6 Hardwood Parlour Chairs.

6 Kitchen Chairs,

a Kitchen Range with Hot-water Boiler and Oven,

2 Register Grates, with Fenders, &c.; and allother Effects of every description and denomination. Likewise,

2 ACRES of First-rate YELLOW TURNIPS, and

8 TONS of WALKER'S EARLY & RED POTATOES.

The whole to be Sold entirely without reserve, as the Exposer is going abroad.

 THE USUAL CREDIT ON BILLS.

Roup to begin at Eleven o'clock forenoon.

 JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

DRAUGHT HORSES, MILCH COWS, AND FARMING IMPLEMENTS, AT GLENEND,

On Saturday the 7th November.

TO BE SOLD BY PUBLIC ROUP, ON SATURDAY THE 7TH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 1857. ON THE FARM OF GLENEND, UPON THE ESTATE OF CRAIGEND, POSSESSED BY MRS. ROY,

THE whole FARM HORSES. MILCH COWS, CATTLE, and FARM IMPLEMENTS, &c, on the above Farm, comprising, -

2 Draught Horses,

3 Milch Cows in Calf,

2 Six-quarter-old Queys,

1 Bull Calf.

2 Famous Hay Waggons with Wheels and Axles,

1 Close-bodied Curt with Wheels and Axle,

4 Close-bodied Cart without Wheels.

1 Iron Plough,

2 Pair of Grain Harrows,

1 Pair of Hand-Fanners, with the whole other Farming Implements, Cheese Press, Dairy Utensils, &c. &c. Also,

ONE ACRE of YELLOW TURNIPS.

To be Sold without Reserve ; the Exposer is leaving the Farm.

 THE USUAL CREDIT.

Roup to begin at Twelve o'clock noon precisely.

JAMES NEILSON. Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald 29th October 5th,12th,19th November 1857

FARMS TO LET.

To be Let for 19 Years,

1. THE FARM of GLENHEAD, in the Parish of Muiravonside and County of Stirling, measuring about 97 Imperial Acres of excellent soil, and produces first-rate Crops. Every Furrow is drained in a substantial manner. The present Tenant leaves in consequence of his going abroad.

 2. The FARM of GLENEND, in the Parish of Muiravonside and County of Stirling, as possessed by the late Mr. John Roy, measuring about 68 Imperial Acres of excellent soil and produces first-rate Crops.

Offers will be received for either of the above Farms, on or before the 6th of November.

The highest Offerer may not be accepted.

For particulars apply to the Proprietor, at Craigend House.

Craigend, October, 1857

 

Falkirk Herald 5th November 1857

THE HUNT. –

The Stirlingshire harriers will meet  on Tuesday 10th Nov. at Avonbridge, and on Saturday 14th Nov. at Stenhousemuir - each morning at half-past 10 o'clock.

HIRING FAIR.-

The autumn hiring fair was held on Thursday last. The day was good, and there was consequently a large turn-out of lads and lasses.  The fees, we understand, were high, and there was a keen demand for good servants.

 

Falkirk Herald 9th November 1857

HUNTING APPOINTMENTS.

The Stirlingshire harriers meet to-morrow at Avonbridge; and Saturday, Nov. 14, at Stenhousemuir;-at half- past 10 o'clock morning.

 

Falkirk Herald 19th 26th November 3rd December 1857

CROP, DRAUGHT HORSES, MILCH COWS, CATTLE, and FARMING IMPLEMENTS, At BOGA, on FRIDAY the 4th December.

To be Sold by Public Roup, on Friday the 4th day of December, 1857, on the Farm of Boga, near Avonbridge, possessed by Mr. Alexander Main, THE whole CROP, FAMOUS YOUNG DRAUGHT HORSES and MARES, celebrated AYRSHIRE MILCH COWS, QUEYS, CATTLE, &c, and FARM STOCKING on the above Farm, comprising –

20 Stacks of excellent Oats.

4 Ricks of Hay.

Likewise, the following Rare Stock of HORSES, viz. –

1 Six-year-old Draught Horse.

1 Four-year-old Draught Mare.

1 Three-year old Draught Colt.

1 Two-year-old Draught Filly.

1 Draught Filly Foal.

ALSO, 12 Famed Ayrshire Milch Cows and Queys, in Calf, a Fine Stock.

4 Ayrshire Queys.

1 Ayrshire Bull - a beauty.

1 Ayrshire Stot.

6 Ayrshire Calves.

3 Close-bodied Carts, with Wheels and Axles, almost new.

2 Iron Ploughs.

2 Pair of Grain Harrows.

1 Large Wooden Roller and Frame.

1 Stone Roller.

1 Three-Horse Iron Grubber - the best.

1 Iron Drill Scraping Plough.

1 Pair of Hand Fanners.

4 Sets of Horse Harness.

A Dog-Cart and Set of Harness.

12 Fire-brick Troughs for cattle.

4 Tons of Walker's Early Potatoes.

2 Boilers and Furnaces.

 A Capital Three-Horse Thrashing-Mill, with Fanners attached.

 Together with the whole of the small FARMING IMPLEMENTS, DAIRY UTENSILS, &c. &c.

THE USUAL CREDIT.

Roup to begin at Eleven o'clock forenoon.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald 10th  December 1857

THE HUNT.

The Stirlingshire harriers meet on Friday (to-morrow) at Polmont, on Tuesday the 15th at Avonbridge, and on Friday the 18th at Dunipace - each morning at hall-past 10 o'clock.

SUMMARY TRIALS. –

The following cases have been disposed of summarily, before Mr. Sheriff Robertson, at the Sheriff-Court here, during the past fortnight: -

4. Mary Dunsmore or M'Farlane, residing at Avonbridge, charged with assault there ; pleaded guilty, and was sentenced to pay a fine of 15s or suffer 15 days' imprisonment.

 

Falkirk Herald 23rd December 1857

Stirlingshire Harriers, Friday 25rh December, at 10.30. Avonbridge.

 

Falkirk Herald 31st December 1857

THE HUNT.

The Stirlingshire harriers will meet to-morrow at Slamannan Village; on Tuesday, Jan. 5, at Maddiston; and on Friday the 8th at Stenhousemuir - each morning at half-past ten o'clock.

 

Falkirk Herald 31st December 1857

TO TEACHERS.

WANTED IMMEDIATELY, an Unmarried and Energetic TEACHER for the numerously attended School at Avonbridge, by Falkirk, now vacant by the removal of Mr. Liddell.

Apply to Mr. James Bell, Preses, with whom Testimonials are to be lodged on or before 9th January, 1858.

NOTICE.

ALL parties having CLAIMS against the deceased Mr. ALEXANDER BAIRD, Quarryman and Grocer at Maddiston, by Falkirk, are requested to lodge the same, duly vouched, in the hands of Mr. John Hay, Shoemaker, Calderbank, by Airdrie, for behoof of the next of kin, within fourteen days from this date. 31st December, 1857.

 

1858

Falkirk Herald 7th January 1858

TO TEACHERS.

WANTED IMMEDIATELY, an Unmarried and Energetic TEACHER for the numerously attended School at Avonbridge, by Falkirk, now vacant by the removal of Mr. Liddell.

Apply to Mr. James Bell, Preses, with whom Testimonials are to be lodged on or before 9th January, 1858.

NOTICE.

ALL parties having CLAIMS against the deceased Mr. ALEXANDER BAIRD, Quarryman and Grocer at Maddiston, by Falkirk, are requested to lodge the same, duly vouched, in the hands of Mr. John Hay, Shoemaker, Calderbank, by Airdrie, for behoof of the next of kin, within fourteen days from this date. 31st December, 1857.

 

Falkirk Herald 14th January 1858

The Hunt. –

The Stirlingshire harriers will meet on Wednesday the 20th inst. at Maddiston, and on Saturday the 23d at Avonbridge - each morning at halt-past 10 o'clock.

 

Caledonian Mercury 18th January 1858

Hunting Appointments

Stirlingshire Harriers meet on Wednesday January 20th at Maddiston, and January 23rd at Avonbridge at half-past ten o’clock morning.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 21st 1858

THE HUNT.

The Linlithgow and Stirlingshire foxhounds will meet to-day at Cockleroi, and on Saturday the 23d at Broxburn - each morning at a quarter before 11 o'clock.

The Stirlingshire harriers will meet on Saturday the 23d at Avonbridge, on Wednesday the 27th at Laurieston Kennels, and on Saturday the 30th at Powmill Toll-bar - each morning at half-past 10 o'clock.

 

Falkirk Herald 21st, 28th, January & 4th February 1858

LANDS IN MUIRAVONSIDE PARISH

To Let upon a Five Course Rotation of Cropping.

THOSE FIELDS, PARTS of the LANDS of TORAVON, extending to 27 acres imperial measure, or thereby, and consisting of Four Inclosures, all well fenced and watered. Those Lands lie to the east of the Village of Maddiston, on the ridge of the Muiravonside Hills, and have been thoroughly drained within the last few years. The Fences will be kept up by the Proprietor during the Lease. The boundaries of the Lands will be pointed out by David Henderson, farm servant at Toravon. Offers addressed to T. H. Ferrier, W.S., 95, George Street, Edinburgh, will be received till 15th February, 1858. Edinburgh, 15th January, 1853.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 4th February 1858

THE HUNT.-

The Linlithgow and Stirlingshire foxhounds will meet to-day at Wallhouse, and on Saturday the 6th at Dechmont Toll-bar - each morning,at a quarter before eleven o'clock.

The Stirlingshire harriers will meet on Saturday the 6th at Millfield Gate, on Wednesday the 10th at Denny, and on Saturday the 13th at Avonbridge -each morning at half-past ten o'clock.

 WEATHER. - On Monday and Tuesday we had a keen frost, which promised good sport to the curling fraternities, but yesterday morning thaw made its appearance, and last night we had a heavy fall of rain.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 11th February 1858

HUNTING APPOINTMENTS. –

The Linlithgow and Stirlingshire foxhounds meet this day, (Thursday, 11th January,) at Hopetoun House; and Saturday, 13th January, at Uphall Inn - each day at a quarter before eleven o'clock.

The Stirlingshire harriers meet on the morning of Saturday next, the 13th inst., at Avonbridge, at half-past ten o'clock.

WEATHER.-

For the last three days there has been a strong east wind blowing, which begets a feeling of very severe cold, besides being productive of colds to a wide extent. Nevertheless, bean sowing is proceeding rapidly and successfully. As much of the ploughing which is usually performed in spring has been accomplished during winter, we may expect the seed-time now at hand to get on well.

THE LATE JAMES RUSSEL, ESQ. OF BLACKBRAES.

We have already stated the circumstances connected with the death of James Russel, Esq. of Blackbraes, senior partner of the firm of Russel and Aitken writers, and of the firm of James Russel and Son, coal and iron-masters. On Thursday last he attended his business as usual; met a large number of gentlemen belonging to the town and neighbourhood, on professional and business matters generally. He spoke to his son, James Russel, Esq., banker, a few minutes before four o'clock, with as firm a tone of voice as on former occasions, and immediately afterwards he wrote a letter with his own hand, the penmanship of which was distinguished by that boldness which was so characteristic of the calligraphy of Mr. Russel. He left the office, as we have already stated, about a quarter past four o'clock, walked home, and had seated himself on a sofa to rest for a few minutes before going to dinner, and immediately after was struck down dead. The deceased gentleman had sustained one or more attacks of the fatal malady under which lie laboured, viz., heart disease, previous to that which terminated so suddenly in his death, so that, although the shock was sudden, and certainly not anticipated at the time by his family, it did not take them altogether by surprise. Mr. James Russel, who succeeds his father to Arnotdale, Blackbraes, and the extensive coal and iron works owned by the firm, resides in Edinburgh, and had left for that city upon Thursday afternoon before his father's death. Mr. John Russel, however, his youngest son, was in almost immediate attendance, and medical assistance was promptly secured. All was done, in short, which the case demanded, or which affection could dictate, but all was of no avail, the vital spark had fled even before Mr. John had reached his father's house; and on the same evening Mr. James Russel was summoned by special express to Arnotdale, to find that his father, whom he had seen a few hours previously apparently in good health, stretched in the "cold obstruction " of death. The life of Mr. Russel, if fairly written, would be found to contain most important lessons. He was one of those men who, by a combination of natural shrewdness and sagacity, acute intelligence, indomitable perseverance, industry, and integrity, have not merely gained an honourable social and professional position for themselves, but have contributed principally to the greatness of the land of their birth. Mr. Russel was born on the 4th May, 1787, and was the eldest son of James Russel, Esq. of Blackbraes, a property in the pastoral parish of Muiravonside, which had been in the family for three generations. The family of which the subject of this notice was the eldest, consisted of four sons, viz., James, John, Alexander, and Henry, and three daughters, Elizabeth, Helen and Mary. Mr. Russel's mother, Margaret Russel, was the daughter of a proprietor whose land lay in the neighbourhood of Blackbraes. In 1795, the family removed from Blackbraes to Falkirk, where they resided on a small property near the eastern extremity of Kerse Lane, which had been purchased by the father of Mr. Russel, and on which he built a house. The family were accordingly brought up and educated in Falkirk; James attending school with the other boys of the town, and signalizing himself in the sports and pastimes incident to school-boy-hood, as well as in the more serious duties of class hours. After having received a good education he was placed as an apprentice in the office of James Aitken, Esq., one of the most respectable writers of his day, and the father of Henry Aitken, Esq., the partner of the late Mr. Russel. On the expiry of his apprenticeship Mr. Russel was sent to Edinburgh in order that he might have the advantage of studying his profession under the auspices of metropolitan instructors. At this period he spent several years in the office of David Thomson, Esq., W.S., a gentleman who combined with the duties of his regular profession those of a keen electioneering agent of the Tory party. Under the training of this gentleman Mr. Russel not only acquired an intimate acquaintanceship with the law of Scotland, but, in all likelihood, received his first bias in favour of the political tenets of the party with which he was subsequently connected, and in whose behalf in his future career he fought such vigorous battles. At this time he was distinguished for his general intelligence, energy, and professional acumen, and did our limits permit, several circumstances might be quoted in proof of what we have just stated. One fact, showing as it does the energy of the man and furnishing as it does the present Inxurious age a striking rebuke, we must mention, The young writer had received an invitation to a ball in his native town while in Edinburgh, and as a young man not insensible to the charms of such gay reunions determined to be present. Railways were, of course, unknown in those days, and as he could not leave until the labour of the day was over, and had to return to his office in time to resume the duties of the succeeding day, the ordinary mode of conveyance probably did not suit those hours. Be that as it may, Mr. Russel left his office in Edinburgh at four o'clock in the afternoon, walked to Falkirk, took a full share, no doubt, in the dancing, walked back to the city in the morning, and was at his desk at the usual hour of commencing business. We question whether there be a young man in Falkirk at the present moment who could accomplish the same feat. About the year 1809 Mr. Russel returned to Falkirk, and immediately commenced business as a writer on his own account. His office, we believe, was in the Robert's Wynd, a small place, presenting a striking contrast to the suite of rooms in which the business which sprang from the germ planted in 1809 is at present carried forward. We are not aware what the extent of his business was when he first started; but a short time subsequent to this an event occurred which threw a amount of business into his hands, and which gave him ample opportunities for the exercise of his great talents and sagacity. We allude to the suspension of the Union Bank of Falkirk. Mr. Russel was appointed trustee, and discharged the complicated and disagreeable duties devolving upon him with general approbation. His professional reputation, and, as a consequence, his professional duties and influence, were immensely increased by the manner in which he had acquitted himself as trustee in connection with this banking concern, and in 1813, four years after he commenced business in Falkirk, and when he was twenty-six years of age, he married Catherine Crawford, daughter of the then late Mr. John Crawford, a prosperous and generally esteemed merchant in Falkirk. By this marriage Mr. Russel had two sons, James and John, and six daughters, two of whom preceded their father to the Spirit Land. The rest of his family he had the happiness of seeing settled in life, and all in affluent circumstances. In the year 1818, five years after his marriage, Mr. Russel took Mr. Henry Aitken, the son of his former master, into partnership, and the firm of Russel & Aitken, thus formed, has gained, during the 40 years which it had existed at the death of Mr. Russel, not merely a reputation which has not been equalled by that of any legal firm in Stirlingshire, but we question whether any legal firm - out of the metropolis - in Scotland has acquired such a wide, and we may remark, just celebrity. Gentlemen in the profession to which Mr. Russel belonged can scarcely fail to have enemies. The loser in litigation naturally overlooks the weak points of his case, and attributes his failure to the ingenuity of the lawyer who has been the means of securing that failure, but, from all we have learned of the professional character of Mr. Russel, during the brief space that we have had an opportunity of knowing him personally, and from enquiries we have made with the view of preparing this brief, and necessarily imperfect, notice of his career, we think we are warranted in asserting that there have been few gentlemen in the profession, actively engaged in it for so long a period, and having been employed in such a variety of cases, with clients of all tempers and dispositions, who have left fewer enemies than the late James Russel, Esq. of Blackbraes. We cannot, however, enter into details respecting the professional character of Mr. Russel. That it was high there cannot be any doubt if his success on the one hand and the character of many of those who entrusted the firm, of which he was the senior partner, with the management of business of the most delicate and complicated character, on the other hand can be accepted as evidence upon this point. The Falkirk Bank commenced business in 1787, the year in which Mr. Russel was born. In 1826, in consequence of a proposition made by the Government of the time to abolish the circulation ot £I notes, the bank was given up. Mr. Russel acted as law agent, and in consequence of his judicious and energetic management, the partners in the concern realised £1650 for every £100 pound share, a fact worth noting at the present time. Not only was Mr. Russel celebrated as an intelligent, acute, and eminently successful law-agent. At an early period of his life he had devoted considerable attention to mineralogy, and in 1845 he turned his knowledge in this department of practical science to account by commencing to work the minerals on his own property of Blackbraes. Under his management the mineral resources of that district were rapidly developed, and a large colony of busy workmen speedily sprung up in what had been one of the most thinly-peopled districts of the county. Ever active and enterprising, from his love of activity and enterprize, in 1849 he leased, or more properly the firm of James Russel and Son leased extensive and rich mineral fields in the vicinity of Bathgate. The now celebrated Boghead gas-coal formed an important feature in the mineral wealth of the Bathgate property. Manufacturers of gas at first entertained strong prejudices against the new mineral, but Mr. Russel, from careful and frequent analysis, had convinced himself of its superiority over any other gas-coal in use, and persevered in the working, ultimately triumphing over all prejudice, and reaping an appropriate reward. In 1850, the firm leased the Torbanehill mineral field, now so famous, and since that period the works in that district have been prosecuted with great vigour to the material improvement of Bathgate. The admirable qualities of this coal are now completely established, and consequently an extensive market, principally through the knowledge and exertions of Mr. Russel, has been found for it, not only on the Continent of Europe, but in more distant parts of the world, it having been ascertained that in consequence of its lightness, and the great proportion of inflammable gas which it contains, it is better adapted for distant carriage than any other coal. In addition to the extensive coal fields owned by the firm, it is in possesssion of large fields of ironstone, and to render these fully available, a site was selected in a most suitable locality, on which the Almond smelting furnaces were erected. Two of these were at work in 1854, and a third is nearly finished. In connection with the coal and iron works, the firm keep about 1500 men in constant employment, and we are happy to learn that these works will be carried on as formerly, go that there will be no diminution of labour in consequence of the death of Mr. Russel. At Blackbraes and Bathgate Mr. Russel, who took a deep interest in education, had established efficient schools for the training of the children of his workmen, and, as an employer, he at all times evinced a hearty interest in the welfare and comfort of his men. We need not inform our Falkirk readers of the vast amount of good the deceased gentleman has done in connection with the Charity School. His contributions to it in money, and in clothing and shoes for the scholars, have at all times been most liberal; he has been the means of securing handsome donations to it from other gentlemen, and at his death he was making arrangements for erecting a new and more suitable school-house than the present. In all useful charities he took the most lively interest, freely contributing to them in money, was always ready with advice, and there are many deserving people in the town, to whom old age had come attended by want, who will be among his most sincere mourners. For many years Mr. Russel has been clerk to the Feuars, and has conducted the business of that body in the most praiseworthy manner. He took a warm interest in everything relating to the improvement of the 'guid auld toon;' and we may mention that a few day's previous to his death, he intimated to two or three gentlemen connected with the town his intention of aiding in the movement for securing a special Police Bill for the burgh. Mr. Russel, we believe, held the honorary office of Interim Sheriff-Substitute for Stirlingshire, and was in the Commission of the Peace for the counties of Stirling and Linlithgow. In proof of the estimation in which he was held by his fellow townsman, it is proper to state that in 1851 he was presented with a handsome silver Epergne at a public dinner in the Red Lion Hotel, the chief magistrate at that time - Robert Adam, Esq., Springbank - being in the chair. The following is the inscription on the testimonial: -Presented to JAMES RUSSEL, Esq. or Arnotdale by his fellow Townsmen and Friends, As a testimonial of Personal respect and Esteem. 22d July, 1851, Falkirk. His residence was the beautiful villa of Arnotdale the grounds and gardens of which are laid out with great taste, and in which Mr. Russel took great pleasure and pride. Last season he threw them open for the annual Flower Show of the Falkirk Horticultural Society, an institution of which he was president, and which he liberally patronised. Of late years Mr. Russel was deprived by deafness from the full enjoyment of society; but his abundant and Hearty hospitality was well known in the district, and although his death Will be mourned by all his townsmen, those who had the happiness of ranking amongst his intimate friends can alone knew the full extent of the loss to the community involved in that event. The tribute of respect paid to Mr. Russel yesterday in the Sheriff-Court by Mr. Sheriff Robertson, before the business of the day commenced, was at once graceful and well deserved, and we are sure that the venerable Mr. Liston expressed the sentiments of the procurators, when he said that they would all have regretted had they not had an opportunity of testifying their respect for the memory of the dead, and their sympathy with his family in the great bereavement they had sustained. Yesterday all that was mortal of Mr. Russel was consigned to the grave, in the family burying place in Muiravonside church-yard. The funeral cortege was the most imposing that ever has been witnessed in Falkirk. The mournful procession started from Arnotdale, at a few minutes past one o'clock, and some idea may be formed of its magnitude, when we state that in addition to a great concourse of gentlemen belonging to the town, who accompanied the procession beyond the precincts of the burgh on foot, there were, including the hearse, and the mourning coaches containing the members of the family, forty carriages present besides a number of gentlemen on horseback At one o'clock the bells began to toll, and continued so doing for the space of an hour. Along the high street, the route of the procession every shop was shut, and crowds of people lined both sides of the street, looking in solemn silence on the imposing cortege as it passed slowly along bearing to its last resting-place the body of one whose living form was recently so familiar to them. "After life's fitful fever he sleeps well;'' and when we look back upon the untiring energy with which he fought the battle of life, the practical sagacity with which he encountered every question which arose for his decision, the vast amount of good he has accomplished by the judicious application of capital to labour, and his extensive and unostentatious benevolence, may not the noble line of Horace be inscribed upon his monument as an appropriate epitaph.

EXEGI MONUMETUM AERE PERENNIUS.

TO BE EXPOSED BY PUBLIC ROUP, ON SATURDAY THE 13TH FEBRUARY, 1858,

belonging to Mr. Thomas Wyse.

THE GRASS PARKS of HILLEND, and One Field of YOUNG GRASS for a Crop of Seed Hay. The Fields are well Watered, Fenced, and Sheltered.

Roup to commence at Two o'clock p.m.

WM. GILLESPIE, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald 18th, 25th February 1858

MUIRAVONSIDE GRASS PARKS,

 On Saturday 6th March. To Let by Public Roup, Saturday the 6th day of March, 1858,

THE GRASS PARKS on the estate of MUIRAVONSIDE, comprising ELEVEN ENCLOSURES, to be Let for Cattle, Sheep, and Horses, as formerly.

Roup to begin with the Parks at Drumbowie at One o'clock afternoon, and to finish with the Parks at Seatrees.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald 25th February 1858

Births

At Knowhead, Maddiston on the 20th inst., Mrs. David Robertson, sen , of a daughter.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 11th March 1858

THE HUNT.

The Linlithgow and Stirlingshire foxhounds meet on the first regular hunting day at Golthall Kennel - at a quarter before eleven o'clock morning.

The Stirlingshire harriers will meet on Tuesday the 16th, at Avonbridge, and on Saturday the 20th, at Linlithgow - each morning at half-past ten o'clock.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 29th April 1858

SLAMANAN.

 Cattle Market.- This half-yearly market for cattle and horses was held on Tuesday, on the usual stance fronting the St. Lawrence Inn. The number of cattle shown was not so great as we have seen it, and by no means equal to the demand. In fact, the stock shown was bought up by eleven o'clock. The prices realised were much the same as the last Linlithgow market. There were no fat cattle on the ground. The market on Tuesday was the briskest that has taken place since its establishment - a fact which speaks well for its future prosperity. Purchasers were much disappointed at the paucity of stock shown, which may be accounted for, perhaps, from the circumstance of Larbert fair taking place next day. the following are a few quotations : - Mr. John Shanks, Wester Jaw, sold, before coming into the market, an excellent calving cow at £15 5s; Mr. Waugh, Gartness, also sold 10 grass beasts, two and three-year-olds, at £6 10s a-head; Messrs Gentleman, Avonbridge,  purchased a calving cow at £10 10s, which they afterwards sold to Mr. Joseph Graham, of Perth, for £12; Mr. Rennie, Gartcows, sold an excellent milch cow to Mr. Wm. Neilson, of Greenwells, at £14; Mr.John Shanks Blackrigg, sold a calving quey at £8 12s 6d: Mr. Wm.Wilson, Glentore, sold one calving cow at £9 10s; Mr. James Scott, Meadowfield, Monklands, sold a three-year-old calving cow at £8 10s ; Mr. James Tennant, Greengairs, sold a calving cow at £9; Mr. Laurie, Camelon, sold four three-year-old calving queys at £9 a-head; Mr. James Reid, Strathaven, sold three grass beasts, two of which brought £15; Mr. Henry Aitken, cattle dealer, Avonbridge, sold 9 grass beats, 4 of these to Mrs. Ferguson, and 5 to Mr. Matthew Nimmo, Foot o' Green, at prices from £7 to L.8 a-head; Mr. Robert Brown, Wester Lochead. sold a farrow for L.7 10s., which was afterwards resold for L7 15s; Mr. Bryce, Bogside, sold 2 two-year-old Ayrshire queys at L13 the pair. The show of horses was also very limited, and few changed hands; Mr.John Downs, Balquhatston, sold a fine draught colt for L.37; Mr. Wm. Paton, Dnunclair, sold a steel-grey three-year-old colt to Mr. Thomas Kirk, near Bo'nesa, at L.21; Mr. James Waugh, North Arnloss, sold a fine saddle pony, fit for harness or saddle, at L.7; Mr. Christie, horse dealer, Stirling, purchased a light grey horse for L.17 10s; Mr. John Wilson, Melans Place, showed a beautiful dark bay stallion.

 

Falkirk Herald 20th & 27th May 1858

MUIRAVONSIDE MORT-SAFE ASSOCIATION.

AS the SAFES have not been used for a considerable time, the Committee have thought it proper to advertise, in the Falkirk Herald, for a GENERAL MEETING. It is hoped that all having Claims will attend, as it is considered that there will be a Dividend of the Funds. The Meeting will take place on Friday the 4th June, in the School-Room of Maddiston, at Seven o'clock Evening.

 ANDREW BOWIE, Preses.

 

Falkirk Herald 27th May 1858

MAY FAIR –

This market for cattle and horses took place on Thursday last on the usual stance, CalanderRiggs. The weather being most favourable in the forenoon, and pasture ground lookingwell from the late previous rains, conduced in bringing out a large attendance of dealers, farmers and others, who entered at once on business with sprit and earnestness. The number of cattle exposed for sale was nearly 400, larger than any previous May Fair held for many years past. The number and quality of the horses shown was considerably above the average. Milch cows are still high in price, for which in general there was a good demand, though buyers were somewhat reluctant to give the prices asked. There were a few lots of young grazing cattle, but the prices realised were not quite as high as expected. The following are a few quotations : - Mr. Rennie, Gartcows, showed few quotations : - Mr. Rennie, Gartcows, showed the highest one sold brought L.18, another L.16, the highest one sold brought L.18, another L.16, others from L.12 to L.14; ten calving cows L.1O 10s a-head - all sold. Mr. Liddell, cattle dealer, had thirty-five cows in the market, four of which he sold to Mr. Thomson, Perth, at L.16 a-head, five to Mr. Moncrieff, Perth, at L.13, others from L.12 to L-15; for one of the above separately, Mr. Liddell of cows this season. Mr. John Gaff, Redding, exhibited a lot of excellent beasts - not all sold. Mr. Graham, Myothill, had thirty - six cattle in market; another lot at L.5 12s 6d, a lot of grass queys at L.6, another lot at L.5 12s 6d, a lot of grass queys at L.6, a lot of cows at L.11, and was oflered L.26 for two fat queys. Mr. Christie, cattle dealer, Stirling, showed twenty-one head of cattle - sold three three-year-old calving cows at L.41; three farrow cows at L-7 7s; two two-year-old stots at L.15 per thirteen head of cattle - sold three three-year-old thirteen head of cattle - sold three three-year-old queys at L.28 10s; five calving cows to Mr. J. Graham, Perth, at L.11 5s a-head on an average; one milch cow at L.14; calving cows at L.8 10s a-head; one quey at L.11; one ditto at L.9 15s. Mr. Henry Aitken, Avonbridge, had nine cattle in market - sold three four-year-old grass beasts to Mr. Wm. Neilson, Galamuir at L.7 10s a-head; a milch cow to Mr. Martin, Edinburgh, at L12 10s - all sold, year old queys at L.6 10s. Mr. Walter Jardine, year old queys at L.6 10s. Mr. Walter Jardine, Blackrigg, sold to Mr. Wm. Gardner, Westfield, a This animal was purchased from Mr. Oswald, Gilston. This animal was purchased from Mr. Oswald, Gilston. Mr. John Shanks, Wester Jaw, sold three calving cows at L.35 per lot. Mr. Jardine, Standhill, Bathgate, sold one cow at L.1O, another at The demand, however, fell considerably short of tne supply. Mr. Dunlop, Bo'ness, showed four fine supply. Mr. Dunlop, Bo'ness, showed four fine animals-sold two at L.28 and L.46 refused L.8O for the remaining pair. Mr. Miller, Linlithgow, showed ten useful horses some of which were,sold at prices from L.25 to L.40.Mr. Charles Otto,bought two roadstersand one cart horse, at prices from L.17 to L.33.L.33. Mr. James Nimmo, sold a fine draught horse at L.38

 

Falkirk Herald 17th , 24th June & 1st July 1858

MUIRAVONSIDE.

THE Members of the Mort-Safe Association met, according to advertisement, on the 2d of June, in the School-room, Maddiston, when it was agreed to sell the Old Metal and Dissolve the Association; and if there is any person considers they have a claim, that were not at the Meeting, they are requested to lodge their claim, in writing, with William Johnston, Secretary to the Association, Grossar Crags, near Rumford, as no verbal claim will be sustained, on or before the 10th of August: and there will be a GENERAL MEETING in the School-Room, Maddiston, upon the 20th August, at 6 o'clock Evening, when the Business will be all wound up.

 

Falkirk Herald 19th  26th July 1858

BOGO HAY AND POTATOES, On FRIDAY, 27th AUGUST. TO be Sold by Public Roup, on Friday the 27th August, 1858, on the Farm of BOGO, near Avonbridge, possessed by Mr. James Kirkwood, 3000 Stones of finely-mixed RYEGRASS & CLOVER HAY in 16 Ricks.

1 Very Famous Clydesdale DRAUGHT COLT, rising three years old;

3 Fat QUEYS, prime fat.

 ALSO, Three Acres of WALKER'S EARLY POTATOES, A MOST prodigious crop.

Roup to begin with the Hay at 5 o'clock, and with the Potatoes at 6.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

AVONBRIDGE.

OATS, WHEAT, POTATOES, TURNIPS, MILCH COWS, QUEYS, AND FARMING IMPLEMENTS.

To be Sold by Public Roup, on Friday the 27th day of August, 1858, at Avonbridge, belonging to the Heirs of the late Robert Marshall, Esq., THE Whole GROWING CROP of OATS, WHEAT, POTATOES, TURNIPS ; also HAY in Ricks, Splendid Ayrshire MILCH COWS and QUEYS, and FARMING IMPLEMENTS, &c, comprising –

5 Acres of famous Oats.

1 Acre of do. Wheat.

2 Acres of do. Turnips.

1 Acre of do. Potatoes.

Half-an-Acre of Fitches.

2 Ricks of Ryegrass Seed Hay.

1 Rick of Meadow Hay.

11 Acres of Pasture Grass – to be Let till Martinmas next.

4 Pure Bred Ayrshire Milch Cows - fit for the Prize Ring, one of which is newly Calved.

1 Six-quarter-old Ayrshire Quey.

1 Ayrshire Calf. A Fat Sow.

A Close-bodied Cart with Wheels and Axle, Iron Plough, Barn Fanners, and the whole of the Farming Implements and Utensils, &c, & c .

Four months' credit.

Roup to begin at Eleven o'clock.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald 29th July 1858

CROP, DRAUGHT AND HARNESS HORSES, MILCH COWS, QUEYS, &c, At REDFORD, On FRIDAY, the 13th August.

TO be sold by Public Roup,on FRIDAY, the 13thAugust, 1858, at REDFORD, belonging to JOHN GRAHAM, Esq., THE Whole GROWING CROP and OLD CORN STACKS, rare CLYDESDALE DRAUGHT HORSES and HARNESS HORSE, AYRSHIRE MILCH COWS and QUEYS, &c., &c., on the  above lands, comprising: -

15 Acres of Capital Oats.

5 Acres of do. Beans.

4 Large Stacks of Oats - crop 1857

2 Powerful Short-Legged Clydesdale Draught horses, famous stamps and rare workers.

1 Harness and Riding Pony, 14 1/2 hands high with perfect action.

3 Grand Ayrshire Milch Cows, also a number of young Young Cattle.

The whole to be Sold, without reserve, as the Exposer has given up Farming.

Four Months' Credit on Bills.

Roup to begin at twelve o'clock noon.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

Falkirk Herald 12th 26th August 30th September  1858

STRATHAVON CROP, HORSES, &c, On SATURDAY the 14th AUGUST.

To be Sold by Public Roup, on Saturday the 14th day of August, 1858,

THE whole GROWING CROP, with Three Draught HORSES, &c, on the Farm of Strathavon, near Avonbridge, possessed by Mr. William Waugh, comprising comprising –

3 Acres of Lint, and

4 Acres of Walker's Early Potatoes, first quality.

ALSO,

2 Draught Horses.

1 Famous 3 year-old Clydesdale Draught Filly.

2 Hay Waggons.

A quantity of Cut Wood, Stack Props, Stack Ladders, &c.

The Crops are remarkably fine.

The whole to be Sold without reserve, as the exposer is leaving the Farm at Martinmas.

Four Months' Credit on Bills.

Roup to begin at Twelve o'clock Noon.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald 26th August

CROP, HORSES, MILCH COWS, CATTLE, AND FARM STOCKING, AT CRAIGEND, On TUESDAY, 24th AUGUST.

 To be Sold by Public Roup, on Tuesday the 24th August, 1858, on the Farm of Craigend, near Avonbridge, possessed by Mr. Robert Thorn,

THE Whole of the Capital CROP, HORSES MILCH COWS, CATTLE, & FARM STOCKING, upon the above Farm, comprising –

21 Acres of Oats.

4 Acres of Barley.

2 Acres of Beans.

3 Acres of Turnips.

2 Acres of Potatoes.

1000 Stones of Perennial Ryegrass Seed Hay in Stacks.

1 Very Rare five-year-old Clydesdale Draught Mare and Foal.

1 Clydesdale Draught Horse. 7 First-class Ayrshire Milch Cows, nothing better.

3 Two-year-old Ayrshire Queys in calf.

3 Six-quarter-old Ayrshire Queys.

4 Ayrshire Calves.

1 Fat Pig, eight months old.

2 Close-bodied Carts with Wheels and Axles, and 3 Sets of Horse Harness.

1 Iron Plough.

1 Iron Land Break, by Potter.

1 Iron Land Grubber, by Wilson.

1 Iron Drill Grubber, by Taylor.

1 Pair of Saddle Harness, by Potter.

2 Pair of Grain, and 1 Pair of Grass-Seed Harrows.

1 Turnip Sowing Machine.

2 Land Rollers.

With the whole of the Small Farming Implements and Utensils of every description and denomination. Four Months' Credit.

The whole to be Sold without reserve, as the Exposer is giving up Farming.

Roup to begin at Eleven o'clock.

AMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald 26th August & 2nd September 1858

MUIRAVONSIDE.

AS the Old Metal of the Safes is Sold, if there is any who consider themselves entitled to a Dividend, they are requested to attend in Maddiston School-Room, on Friday the 3d day of November, at -Half-past 6 o'clock Evening, to receive their share of the Money, as all will be divided. Those failing to attend will have themselves to blame.

 JAMES ROBERTSON, Preses.

 

Falkirk Herald 16th September 1858

SHERIFF CRIMINAL COURT.

Janet Grey or Pettigrew, and Mary Forgie, from the Loan near Avonbridge, pled guilty to the theft of some coals from off the Railway at Avonbridge. They were each sentenced to pay 5s or go to prison for 5 days. The fines were paid.

 

 

Falkirk Herald 7th 21st 28th October 1858

To be Sold by Public Roup, on Saturday the 30th day of October, 1858, on the Farm of Strathavon, near Avonbridge, possessed by Mr. Wm. Waugh,

THE Whole of the Famous MILCH COWS, QUEYS and CALVES, HORSES, CROP, and FARM STOCKING, &c., on the above Farm, comprising –

10 Favourite Ayrshire Milch Cows in Calf.

3 Ayrshire Queys in Calf.

2 Six-quarter-old Queys.

3 Ayrshire Calves.

1 Six-year-old Draught Mare in Foal.

1 Draught Horse.

1 Draught Foal.

7 Stacks of Oats.

4 Stacks of Barley.

2 Stacks of Meadow Hay.

3 Close-bodied Carts, with Wheels and Axles.

1 Water Cart, with Wheels and Axle and Water Barrel.

1 Stone Cart.

1 Hay Waggon.

2 Wood and 1 Stone Rollers, with Frames.

2 Turnip Sowing Machines, 1 for Double and Single Sowing.

1 Iron Plough, by Gray of Uddingston.

1 Drill Grubber.

 3 Pair of Grain Harrows.

3 Sets of Cart and Plough Horse Harness.

1 Cheese Press and 2 Cheese Stones.

1 Cattle Boiler. &c.

2 Meal Girnals and 1 Horse Corn Chest, with the whole of the small Farming Implements and Utensils, &c. &c. Likewise,

A THREE-HORSE THRASHING-MILL, And a large quantity of MANURE, and some articles of Household Furniture. The whole to be sold without reserve, as the- Exposer is leaving the Farm.

The usual credit.

Roup to begin at 11 o'clock Forenoon.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald 7th 14th 15th October 1858

EXTENSIVE SALE OF CORN STACKS, MILCH COWS, QUEYS, CALVES, &c.; AND GRASS PARKS TO LET, AND LAND FOR CROPPING, AT BULLIONDALE, ON MONDAY, 18th OCTOBER.

To be Sold by Public Roup, on Monday the 18th day of October, 1858, on the Farm of Bulliondale, near Avonbridge, belonging to Mr. Andrew Mungal,

THE Whole CROP, MILCH COWS, QUEYS, CALVES, POTATOES, and TURNIPS, &c, on the above Lands, comprising - 

27 Stacks of Capital OATS.

1 Acre of TURNIPS.

Half-an-Acre of POTATOES.

6 First-Class Ayrshire MILCH COWS, four in Calf and two Farrow.

2 Ayrshire QUEYS in Calf. 4 Six-quarter-old Ayrshire QUEYS.

6 Ayrshire CALVES.

Also, at the same time will be Let for Ploughing,

ONE TEN ACRE FIELD, to be Cropped with Oats or Lint;

AND FIVE GRASS PARKS for next Season's Grazing, varying in size from 4 to 10 Acres, all of which are well Fenced and Watered.

The usual credit.

Roup to begin at Twelve o'clock Noon.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald 14th October 1858

The Harriers - The Stirlingshire Harriers will meet on Monday the 18th inst. at Linlithgow, and on Friday the 22d inst. at Maddiston, each morning at halt-past ten o'clock

 

Glasgow Herald 22nd October 1858

HUNTING APOINTMENTS.-

The Stirlingshire and Linlithgow foxhounds meet at Eastend on Saturdaly, 23d Oct., at 10.45. The Stirlingshire harriers meet at Maddiston on Friday the 22d Oct., at 10.30.

 

Falkirk Herald 28th October 1858

The Stirlingshire harriers meet on Monday at Avonbridge; and Friday at Larbert House, each day at half-past 10.

 

Falkirk Herald 4th November 1858

FARM IN MUIRAVONSIDE TO BE LET.

To be Let for 19 Years,

THE FARM of WESTER DRUMBROIDER on the Estate of Redford, in the Parish of Muiravonside, as possessed by Mr. Andrew Stevenson. Entry to Houses and Lands at Martinmas first;

Offers to be given in to John Graham, Esq., the Proprietor, at Redford House; or to James Neilson, Auctioneer, Falkirk, on or before the 10th November next.

Falkirk, October 16, 1858.

STOCK AND CROP FOR SALE.

There will be Sold by Public Roup, at HILLEND, near Avonbridge, on Saturday, the 6th November next, THE following STOCK, &c, belonging to Mr. Jas. Binnie, consisting of –

2 Excellent MILCH COWS, in Calf.

1 Farrow COW, in good condition.

1 Two-year-old QUEY, in Calf.

2 Prime Fat PIGS.

ALSO, 2 Stocks of OATS, well got.

1 Stack of STRAW.

1 Rick of MEADOW HAY.

A Small Field of YELLOW TURNIPS;

And a considerable quantity of Dairy Utensils.

USUAL CREDIT GIVEN.

Sale to begin at One o'clock p.m.

WM. GILLESPIE Auctioneer.

Hillend, 30th October, 1858.

SLAMANNAN FAIR. –

This half-yearly market for cattle and horses was held on Tuesday. The bulk of the stock exhibited was about the average. The market for all kinds was considered dull, though a good many sales were effected at prices a shade below those obtained at the last Falkirk Tryst. In the evening a concert was held in the Free Church School-room, and dancing was maintained with some spirit in the hall attached to the St. Lawrence Inn. The day was observed generally as a holiday.

FEEING FAIR. –

On Thursday last, the half-yearly (Martinmas) hiring fair for servants was held here. By an early hour all the roads and entrances to the town were literally crowded with "buirdly chiels and bonny lasses," wending their way in high spirits to the place of rendezvous. The arrival of the early trains from both stations also brought a large proportion of masters, servants, and other visitors; and by ten o'clock the principal portion of the High Street was blocked with people; so much so, that forcing a passage through the crowd was next to impossible. The number of servants apparently open to a hiring fee was above the average for a Martinmas market, and the fees were down from £1 to 30s, for servant who were changing their places, but those who were re-engaged by their former masters were allowed the same wages as formerly. Female servants' fees ranged from £3 to £4, and in some caaes £4 10s, for the half-year. Ploughmen (young lads) would have about £7; experienced hands from £9 to £10; and foremen from £11 to £13. Feeing continued brisk till about one o'clock, about which time it was considered that a large proportion of those wanting places were engaged.

IMPORTANT LAW POINT.

In the Small Debt Court, yesterday week, Sheriff Robertson gave a decision in a case - Dykes v. Bryce - arising out of the following allegations, and involving what may be much curious legal lore: A few weeks ago the herd of Mr. Bryce was driving from the pasture his herd of cows and bull, and, on the way, met the pursuer's cows on the road leading between Avonbridge and Linlithgow, near to Blackstone; the bull gored and seriously injured one of the pursuer's cows, as he alleged, and for this injury damages, &c, were claimed to the amount of £7 odds. For the defendant it was denied that his bull injured the pursuer's cow, and he pled that even had the fact been otherwise, he was not liable, in respect of the legal rule that "one who is not culpable is not liable to repair any damage which he may have done, and that one who, jure suo utitur, or does no more than he has a right to do, is not bound to repair the loss he hath caused another to suffer." The defender founded on a statute of David the Second, which, as a curiosity in law literature, may here be quoted - viz "Ane man passand be the king's hie way, callis before him twa schiep bund together with ane tow and with the twa ends thereof; and be chance ane horse, havand ane sair back, is lyand in the samine hie way: swa the ane of the scheip passes be the richt side, and the other scheip by the other side of the horse; and the tow, quherewith they are bound, tuiches his sair back; wherethrow he is moved to rise up, and caries the schiep hingand ane upon his ane side and the other upon the other side, here and there in sundrie places, and throw the fieldis until he comes to ane open miln without ane keiper, havand ane fire in the middle flure; and the fire being scattered, the miln is brunt with the twa schiep and the horse. It is demanded quha sail answer for this skeath and damages ? It is answered, the owner of the horse sail pay for the twa scheip, because the king's hie way sould not be occupied be the horse; and the milner sail answer for the burning of the miln, for the horse and for the scheip, and for all other skaith and damage done in the miln because he left the miln open, and fire in it without ane keiper. The recent ease of Major Orr and Captain Fleming was also pled in defence. After a lengthened proof, the Sheriff sustained the defences with costs.

Agents for pursuer-John Smith & Wilson; for defender - Adam Smith.

 

Falkirk Herald 11th November 1858

APPRENTICE WANTED FOR the BLACKSMITH BUSINESS. –

Apply at Maddiston Smithy.

 

Falkirk Herald 23rd December 1858

NOTICE.

IN an APPLICATION to the Commissary of the County of Stirling, at the instance of Jean Orr or Hardie, residing at Avonbridge, to have the Caution to be found by her as Executrix dative of the deceased Mary Orr or Waddell, who died at Boxton, in the Parish of Muiravonside, restricted to £50 Sterling, the Commissary-Depute, of this date, appointed the Petitioner to intimate, by advertisement in the North British Advertiser, Stirling Journal, and Falkirk Herald newspapers, the import of the prayer of the Petition; and that she had applied to the Commissary to restrict the Caution to be found by her to the sum of £50, that all parties might be certiorated of the Application; and ordained all parties having objections thereto, to lodge the same with the Clerk of Court within Ten days from the date of the advertisement, with certification.

Of all which intimation is hereby given.

Stirling, 20th December,

1859

 

Falkirk Herald 6th January 1859

The Stirlingshire harriers meet at Maddiston on Monday next, and on Thursday following at Linlithgow – each day at half-past ten o'clock.

 

Caledonian Mercury Thursday 20th January 1859

LAW INTELLIGENCE

TEIND COURT

AUG.-THE MINISTER OF MUIRAVONSIDIE  V. THE HERITORS.

 The last augmentation was granted so long ago as 1822, since which date the population has increased from 1500 to 3000. The stipend was fixed at 14 chalders, with L8 6s 8d for communion elements. The rental is L14, 932, and there is sufficient free teind. The minister asked an augmentation of, 4 chalders, and an increase of the sum, allowed, for elements to L10. The heritors made no opposition.

The COURT granted the augmentation, Counsel for the Minister - Mr. Cook. Morton, Whitehead, and Greig, W.S., Agents. –

 

Glasgow Herald Thursday 20th January 1859

TEIND COURT-

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19.

AUGMENTATIONS OF STIPEND.

The Court allowed an augmentation of four chalders to the stipend of Muiravonside, raising it to eighteen chalders, and raising the sum for communion elements to £10; and an augmentation of two chalders to the stipend of Old Deer, raising it also to eighteen chalders, there being no opposition on the part of the heritors of either parish. Mr. Cook stated the case for both ministers.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 27th  January 1859

SLAMANAN.

 Slamanan Ploughing Match. –

The above match came off on Friday the 14th inst., at Middlerigg, the farm of Thomas Brown, Esq. The day was most favourable, and at 9 A.M. sixteen ploughs started. By 3 P.M. the work was over, and the judges - Messrs Shanks, Gartliston, old Monkland ; Wilson, Kendyshill, Muiravonside; and Mitchell, Maidrox, New Monkland - after a very critical inspection of the work done, declared the following as priz men: -Seniors - 1st, John Jarvie, servant to Mr. Scott, Binniehill; 2d, William Wilson, farmer, Drumclair; 3d, George Nisbet, farmer, Longrigg; 4th, William Hodge, Wester Jaw; 5th, John Findlay, Todsbughts; 6th, James Shanks, jun., Oakersdykes. Juniors, under 20 years of age - 1st, Henry Shanks, Hillend ; 2d, James Ballantine, son of Mr. Ballantine, Jawcraig; 3d, Henry Brown, servant to Mr. Downs, Balquhatston. The society have to acknowledge the receipt of several articles of value to be given as prizes ; among the rest, a silver medal from Mr. Watt, Roughrigg; a collar, from Mr. Pender, saddler, Falkirk ; ditto, from Mr. Ballantine,Jawcraig; a pair of blinders, from Mr. Martin, Highstonerigg - and an excellent riding bridle fromMr. Smith Camelon; as also, £1 subscription from Mr. Horne, minister of Slamanan. After the labours of the field, the members, judges, and several gentlemen from a distance, sat down to a substantial dinner in the St. Lawrence Inn. Mr. Downs, president of the society occupied the chair, and Mr. Robert Taylor very ably discharged the duties of croupier. The usual loyal, patriotic, and local toasts were drunk and responded to, often with very telling effect, and the company, after spending a most harmonious evening, separated about 10 P.M.

 

Falkirk Herald 3rd February 1859

The Stirlingshire harriers meet at Laurieston  kennel, to-day ;on Saturday the 5th at Maddiston ;on Monday the 7th at Linlithgow ;on Thursday the  10th at Avonbridge; and on Saturday the 12th at  Larbert House - each day at half-past ten o'clock.

 

Falkirk Herald 3rd February 1859

PLOUGHING MATCH. –

On Tuesday a match, open to all who choose to compete, took place on the farm of Wester Bowhouse, in the parish of Muiravonside, possessed by Mr. John Binnie. The competitors, twenty-seven in number, came from considerable distances to test their powers in this almost artistic trade. The ploughing commenced at eight o'clock in the morning, and terminated some time in the afternoon. It was allowed on all hands that the ploughing performed was far above an average; indeed, we have rarely, if ever, witnessed   it done in better style. The judges were, Messrs William Neilson, farmer, Greenwells; John Walker  farmer, Inch ; John Deas, farmer, Clarendon ; John  Wilson, farmer, Kendieshill; and James Russell  overseer, Muiravonside; and who awarded the prizes as follows : 1st prize, to Daniel Russell, farmer, Dales, Whitburn; 2d, to John Hunter, servant to Admiral Hope, Carriden; 3d, to John Jarvie, servant to Mr. James Scott, Binniehill, Slamannan; 4th, to George Walker, servant to Mr. John Walker,  farmer, Inch, Grangemouth; 5th, to John Wilson, Melonsplace; 6th, to A. Russell, farmer, Dales Whitburn; 7th, to Henry Brown, servant to Mr. Thomas Struthers, farmer, Frinleymire.

Mr. Binnie entertained the judges, and several other gentlemen connected with the ploughing, to dinner at Bowhouse, in the evening. John Graham, Esq. of Redford, occupied the chair, and the evening was spent with the greatest hilarity.

 

Caledonian Mercury Thursday 3rd February 1859

N0TICE.

IN the Process of Augmentation, Modification, and Locality, at the instance of the Rev. JAMES McFARLAN, Minister of the Parish of MUIRAVONSIDE, in the Presbytery of Linlithgow, and County of Stirling, against the Heritors of said Parish, the Lord Ordinary, by an Interlocutor, dated on the 28th ult., appointed the whole Heritors to MEET in STEVENSON's Salerooms, ST ANDREW SQUARE, Edinburgh, on TUESDAY the 15th day of FEBRUARY current, at Half-past One o'Clock afternoon, for the purpose of naming a person to be suggested to his Lordship as Common Agent for conducting the Locality of the Pursuer's Stipend, and ordained the Heritors to produce their rights to Teinds, and Valuations thereof, in the Clerk's hands, betwixt and the 28th day of April next, under the usual certification.

MORTON, WHITEHEAD, & GREIG, W.S., Agents. Edinburgh, 2d February 1959

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 24th February, 3rd March 1859

MUIRAVONSIDE GRASS PARKS,

On SATURDAY, 5th MARCH.

To Let by Public Roup, on Saturday the 5th day of March, 1859, THE GRASS PARKS on the Estate of Muiravonside, comprising ELEVEN ENCLOSURES, To be Let for Cattle, Sheep, and Horses, as formerly. Roup to begin with the Parks at Drumbowie at One o'clock Afternoon, and to finish with the Parks at Seatrees, &c.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

LOCAL INTELLIGENCE.

The Stirlingshire harriers meet at Avonbridge on Monday the 28th instant, and on Thursday the 3d March next, at Linlithgow: each day at 11 o'clock.

 

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 24th February 1859

HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE AND OTHER EFFECTS FOR SALE.

There will be exposed to Sale by Public Roup, on Saturday the 5th day of March next, at the Dwelling-House, Garden, and Premises at Dykeneuck, Muiravonside, possessed by the late John Duncan, Blacksmith there, and now by Helen Morton, his Widow,

THE Following Effects, - viz., Two Chests of Mahogany Drawers, a Pembroke Table & Cover, Grates, Fenders, and Fire-Irons, two Dressing-Glasses, a Cupboard ; also a Pig, and numerous other Effects. Sale to commence at 12 o'clock noon. Falkirk, 21st February, 1859.

NUMBER OF PERSONS EMPLOYED ON SCOTCH RAILWAYS. –

From a return presented to Parliament on Monday, we learn that the number of men employed on Scotch railways on the 30th June 1858 was 12,647. The number of miles of railway opened for traffic on the same date was 1311, and the number of stations thereon 434. The number of miles of lines and branches in course of construction on the same day was 142; and the length of line authorised, but not commenced, 396 miles. On the lines in course of construction 6333 men were employed.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 31st March 7th April 1859

NOTICE.

ANY Persons having CLAIMS against the late Mr. ROBERT MARSHALL, of Bridgend, Avonbridge, are requested to lodge the same with Messrs Russel & Aitken, Writers; and all Parties INDEBTED to the deceased are requested to make payment of their Debts, to Russel & Aitken, within Four Weeks from this date. Falkirk, 18th March, 1859.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 7th April 1859

AVONBRIDGE.

FATAL RAILWAY ACIDENT. - Yesterday morning about half past nine o'clock, a man named William ] Dick, aged 60 years, and employed as a gatekeeper at the level crossing, near Blackstone, on the Monkland  Railway, met with his death under the following  melancholy circumstances. An engine was coming up the line, and deceased, having closed one gate was crossing the line to close the other; the engine, how- ever, came upon him before he had time to get out of its reach, and he was killed on the spot. The body, when lifted up, was much mutilated, an arm and leg were broken, and his skull fractured. A post mortem examination of the body was shortly afterwards taken by Dr. Kirk, Bathgate. As far as we have learned, no blame is attributable to the engine-driver.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 14th April 12th 19th May 1859

SMALL FARM IN STIRLINGSHIRE TO LET,

For 19 Years, now or at Martinmas.

THE FARM OF FOGGERMONT, at the Avonbridge Station of the Slamannan Railway, about five miles from Falkirk, six miles from Bathgate and Linlithgow, and 22 miles from Glasgow, containing about 50 imperial acres, including a piece of Moss. Nearly the whole of the arable land was thoroughly drained three years ago. The Farm has been in the hands of the Proprietor for some years, and can be let either at Whitsunday or Martinmas first. James Brown, the Foreman, will show the Lands; and further particulars will be given on application to R. G. Balderston, Bishopbriggs, who will receive offers till the 22nd of this month.

Bishopbriggs, 2nd April, 1859.

 

 

 

 

Caledonian Mercury Friday 29th April ; Glasgow Herald Monday 2nd ; Fife Herald Friday 5th ; Aberdeen Journal Wednesday 11th May 1859

PULPIT-GOWN ESTABLISHMENT

NEW STYLE OF CLERGYMEN'S GOWNS.

THERE being no good reason why improvements should not be made on this part of Clerical Costume as well as any other parts of Gentlemen's dress, the Subscriber begs to announce that he has recently succeeded in adding to his large and varied Stock of Gowns one of the most Elegant and Comfortable Styles yet introduced; it is very much admired, and gives general satisfaction; hence the large increase to his business in this Particular department.

LADIES, AND CONGEEGATIONAL COMMITTEES, who may take an interest in such matters, are respectfully invited to call and see the various Styles (prices ranging from £3 3s to £12 12s.) But, if this be not convenient, a Box with a few gowns can be sent on sight to any part of the United Kingdom when requested.

BY

JAMES MIDDLEMASS,

18 SOUTH BRIDGE STREET.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 5th May

FAMOUS FARM HORSES AND FARM STOCKING.

To be Sold by Public Roup,on Friday the 20th May, 1859, on the Farm of FOGGERMONT, near Avonbridge, belonging to R. G. BALDERSTON, Esq.

 THE Whole First-Class FARM STOCKING &C., on the above Farm, comprising –

1 Rare Clydesdale Brood Mare.

1 Draught Three-year-old Clydesdale Colt, out of the above by Heather Jock, perfection.

1 One-year-old Ditto.

1 Farrow Cow.

2 Ricks of Ryegrass Hay.

2 Close-bodied Carts with Wheels and Axles.

1 Hay Waggon. 2 Sets of Cart and Plough Horse Harness.

1 Iron Plough,

1 Iron Grubber.

1 Boiler and Furnace. Grain Harrows, Water Barrel, Grain Bags; with the whole other Farming Implements and Utensils, &c., &c., all of which are little worse than new. - Also, 3 Acres of Young Ryegrass and Clover Hay.

THREE MONTHS' CREDIT.

Roup to begin at Twelve o'clock Noon.

 JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 26th May

CATTLE MARKET. –

The May fair for cattle and horses was held on Thursday. There were between 400 and 500 bead of cattle exhibited, consisting principally of milch cows and queys, and a short supply of grazing cattle. The numbers were considerably less than we have seen at corresponding markets of previous years. The other fairs which have taken place so recently in the neighbouring districts gave intending purchasers an opportunity of being supplied. There were no fat cattle shown. The market, in the morning, was somewhat brisk, but sales afterwards were effected slowly, not because there was a scarcity of purchasers, but on account of the high prices asked. Prices were a shade lower than last Linlithgow market, but higher than those realised at Denny. The greater number of the cattle changed owners by one or two o'clock, when clearance was effected to make room for the horsemarket. In this department a number of good draught horses were shown, but few sales of any moment made. There seemed little demand for horses, owing to agricultural labour being in an advanced state. Of the general market the following are a few quotations:- Messrs Gentleman. Avonbridge, sold two excellent Ayrshire cows for £35. Mr. A. Liddell, Denny, had thirty-eight milch cows in market (as usual of good quality), eight of which were sold in one lot at £15 a head; others at prices ranging from £12 to £15 - all sold. Mr. Graham, Myothill, exhibited fifty head of cattle, consisting of milch cows, queys, two and three year old stots, and a few Highland queys: he sold a lot of four cows for £56; calving queys at £11 a head; a lot of stots at £9; two-year-old queys at £5 10s; farrow cows at £8 a head, and five Highland heifers for £28 2s 6d per lot; a lot of back calving cows brought £9 a head. Messrs Rennie, Gartcows, showed twenty excellent milch cows, at prices averaging from £9 to £16 a head. There was also a fine display of stallions on the Callendar Road at two o'clock. The greater number of these were noticed at Larbert fair, so that any farther description of them would be superfluous.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 30th June, Dunfermline Press Thursday 28 July, Dunfermline Saturday Press  Saturday 30 July 1859

ASSOCIATION OF INSPECTORS OF POOR OF THE COUNTIES of STIRLING & CLACKMANNAN.

THE QUARTERLY MEETING of this ASSOCIATION was held within the Council Chambers, at Linlithgow, on the 25th inst., when the following Office-Bearers were appointed for the current year, viz. : - Mr. JOHN BEEBY. Falkirk, President.

Mr. THOMAS RUSSEL, Clackmannan, Secretary and Treasurer.

 

Messrs REID, Torryburn,

STEWART, Carnock,

HENDERSON, Muiravonside,                       Councillors.

 MITCHELL, Larbert,

HARDIE, Linlithgow.

 

Since this Association was formed a few years ago, it has been the means of diffusing much useful information, tending to clear the ambiguities which experience has proven to be connected with the working of the Poor Law, more than almost any other law. Many disputed cases have been amicably arranged, thereby preventing litigation, and thus saving the funds of Parochial Boards for their legitimate purposes, whilst the members themselves have been mutually benefited by the friendly interchange of individual experiences acquired in the discharge of their onerous duties. This Association, though still comparatively local, is not now singular, as many of a kindred nature have more recently sprung up; and such is the confidence with which Parochial Boards have been inspired by the decisions of disputed cases submitted to some of these Associations, that several of these Boards have voluntarily agreed to submit disputed points for their decision, thus stamping them with their approbation, and proving that what was at first intended to be more immediately a personal benefit has resulted in subserving the public interest.

 

Glasgow Herald Monday 1st August 1859

MILLS TO LET,

For Seven, Ten, or Fifteen Years, Entry at Martinmas Next: -

THE FLOUR , BARLEY, and CORN MILLS of MANUEL, Parish of  Muiravonside and County of Stirling, in consequence of the death of the late occupier, Mr. Brock. They are situated upon the Water of Avon, within two miles of Linlithgow and six of Falkirk; have a plentiful supply of Water; and being in the neighbourhood of the Edinburgh and Glasgow and Monklands Railways, and the Union Canal, command ready access to the best markets. There is also a suitable Dwelling House and Offices. Along with the Mills there will be Let about 29 ACRES Imperial of LAND, of the best quality, and suitable for all kinds of Crops, as possessed, by Mr.Brock.

Offers to be lodged with Messrs. MacRitchie, Bayley and Henderson. W.S., 11 Royal Exchange, Edinburgh, betwixt and the 10th of September next: by whom, or Mr. Alexr. Brock, Randyford, by Falkirk further particulars will be given.

N.B.-The Proprietor not to be bound to accept the highest  Offer. Edinburgh, 20th July, 1859.

 

Falkirk Herald 4th August 1859

DEATHS

At Maddiston, Stirlingshire, on the 27th ult., John, aged 19 months, son of James Bain, bookseller, Glasgow.

LOCAL INTELLIGENCE.

Assault upon Police-Officers. –

On the evening of Saturday or Sabbath morning last, James Hunter, hawker, Avonbridge, entered the house of James Simpson Stewart, police officer, Slamanan, and assaulted him by striking him several blows about one of the eyes and face. The police-officer, however, got hold of Hunter, and succeeded in detaining him until more assistance arrived, when the hawker was secured. He was brought up on Monday, before Interim-Sheriff McFarlane, and upon pleading guilty, he was sentenced to pay a fine of 30s or 30 days' imprisonment.

 

Caledonian Mercury Saturday 6th August, Stirling Observer Thursday 11th August 1859

MARRIAGES.

At Muiravonside Manse, on the 4th inst., by the father of the bride, Archibald Campbell, Esq., Charlotte Square, Edinburgh, to Christian, second daughter of the Rev. James M'Farlan, minister of the parish of Muiravonside.

 

Falkirk Herald 11th August 1859

GOWANBANK CROP AND HAY On FRIDAY the 19th AUGUST.

TO be Sold by Public Roup, on Friday the 19th August, 1859, on the Lands of Gowanbank, near Avonbridge, belonging to the Trustees of the late Walter Gowans, Esq.,

13 Acres of SANDY OATS,

13 Acres of AYRE SEED OATS,

 and 13 Ricks of RYEGRASS and CLOVER HAY.

 The Oats are heavy and fine, being after green crop and old lea land; and the Hay is of sterling quality. FOUR MONTHS' CREDIT.

 Roup to begin at Two o'clock Afternoon, immediately after the Sale at Foggermont.

 JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

BIRTHS.

Here, at Bank Street, on the 4th inst., the wife of Mr. James Forgie, pawnbroker, of a daughter.

At South Logie Brae, Avonbridge, on the 2d inst., Mrs. John Miller, of a son.

 

Falkirk Herald 11th 18th August 1859

GROWING CROP, MILCH COW, &c, AT FOGGERMONT, On FRIDAY the 19th AUGUST.

To be Sold by Public Roup, on Friday the 19th August. 1859, on the Farm of Foggermont, near Avonbridge, belonging to R. G. Balderston, Esq.,

THE Whole GROWING CROP, MILCH COW, &c, on the above Farm, comprising-

18 Acres of Oats.

 4 Acres of Wheat.

2 Acres of Beans.

2 Acres of Turnips.

And Half-an-acre of Potatoes.

 Also, 1 Favourite Ayrshire Milch Cow.

 The whole to be Sold without reserve, as the Proprietor has let the Farm.

THE USUAL CREDIT.

Roup to begin at Twelve o'clock Noon.

 JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday25th August 1859

GROWING CROP AND FAT CATTLE AT CRAIGEND,

On WEDNESDAY the 31st AUGUST.

 To be Sold by Public Roup, on Wednesday the 31st August, 1859, on the Farm of Craigend, possessed by Mr. David Robertson,

THE Whole GROWING CROP, Old WHEAT STACK, and FAT CATTLE, on the above Farm, comprising –

23 Acres of Sandy, Hopeton, and Dun OATS

4 Acres of BEANS,

4 Acres of BARLEY,

1 Large Stack of OLD WHEAT, and

6 Fat QUEYS.

FOUR MONTHS' CREDIT.

Roup to begin at Twelve o'clock Noon.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

EXTENSIVE SALE OF CROP AT KNOW HEAD AND MANUEL-RIGG,

On WEDNESDAY the 31st AUGUST.

 To be Sold by Public Roup, on Wednesday the 31st August, 1859,

On the Farms of Know-Head and Manuel-Rigg, near Maddiston, possessed by Mr. David Robertson,

THE Whole GROWING CROPS and HAY on the above Farms, comprising –

55 Acres of Sandy, Dun, and other OATS,

10 Acres of BARLEY.

8 Acres of BEANS,

2 Acres of WHEAT, and

700 Stones of Ryegrass and Clover HAY, in Ricks.

The whole to be Sold without reserve, as the Exposer is leaving the Farm.

Four Months' Credit.

 Roup to begin at Two o'clock Afernoon, immediately after the Sale at Craigend.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 8th September 1859

POTATOES.

TO be Sold by Public Roup, on Saturday, 10th September current, on the Farm of Glenend, Parish of Muiravonside, and belonging to Mr. John M'Laren, about TWO ACRES OF WALKER'S EARLIES, a capital Crop, of first-rate quality.

Roup to begin at Five o'clock Afternoon.

R. SANDERSON, Auctioneer.

Linlithgow, 3d Sept 1859

ROUP OF POTATOES AT EASTER STRATHAVON. TO be Sold by Public Roup, on Monday 12th September current, upon the Farm of Easter Strathavon, near Avonbridge, and belonging to Captain Ovenstone, about FOUR ACRES GROWING POTATOES, PRINCE REGENTS. The Crop is one of the most abundant in the district, and the quality is unsurpassable.

 Roup to begin at Half-past Five o'clock Afternoon.

ROBERT SANDERSON, Auctioneer.

 Linlithgow, 5th Sept.,

SHERIFF AND JURY TRIALS. –

At a Sheriff and Jury Criminal Court, held at Stirling on Monday, presided over by Mr. Sheriff Robertson, of Falkirk, the following cases, at the instance of John Gair, Procurator-Fiscal, Falkirk, were disposed of:

Daniel Cassells was placed at the bar charged with assault on a pregnant woman, and previous conviction, in so far as on the 6th of July last near the house at Blackbraes, parish of Muiravonside, then occupied by the prisoner, he did wickedly and feloniously attack and assault Margaret Kindred or Heaps, then in a state of pregnancy, and did with his foot kick her violently to the injury of her person. Four certified copies of previous convictions were also produced against the prisoner, who pled not guilty, but after evidence was led, Cassells was found guilty and sentenced to two months' imprisonment.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 20th October 1859

GREENWELLS TURNIPS, On SATURDAY, 22d OCTOBER.

To be Sold by Public Roup, on Saturday the 22d October, 1859, on the farm of Greenwells, possessed by Mr. William Neilson, FIVE ACRES of ABERDEEN YELLOW TURNIPS, which are quite equal to the Crops of former years. Credit as usual.

 Roup to begin at Four o'clock precisely.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 20th 27th October 1859

FAT CATTLE, POTATOES, & TURNIPS, AT GOWAN-BANK, On SATURDAY the 29th OCTOBER.

TO be Sold by Public Roup, on Saturday the 29th October, 1859, on the Lands of Gowan- Bank, near Avonbridge, belonging to the Trustees of the late Walter Gowans, Esq.,

6 PRIME FAT CATTLE;

12 TONS OF POTATOES, WALKER'S EARLIES,

 A Treat to Eat; and

8 ACRES OF FIRST-CLASS TURNIPS.

THREE MONTHS' CREDIT.

Roup to begin at One o'clock Afternoon precisely.

 JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

DISPLENISHING SALE OF CROP, MILCH COWS, FARMING IMPLEMENTS, HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE, &c.,

AT MUIRHEAD, NEAR AVONBRIDGE, On FRIDAY the 28th OCTOBER.

TO be Sold by Public Roup, at Muirhead, near Avonbridge, on Friday the 28th October, 1859, belonging to Mr. Thomas Dykes, comprising :-

4 Stacks of OATS.

1 Rick of HAY.

2 MILCH COWS in Calf.

1 QUEY in Calf, at the drop, rising three years old.

1 Wooden House.

1 Stone Roller.

A Barn Floor.

Chest of Mahogany Drawers, Mahogany Table, two Close Beds, Kitchen Chairs, Milk Barrels, 2 Churns, and a quantity of Dairy Utensils, and other Articles.

Three Months' Credit on approved Bills, or Discount for Cash.

Sale to commence at One o'clock Afternoon,

WM. GILLESPIE, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 10th November 1859

A SMITHY and DWELLING HOUSE at Strathloanhead, in the Parish of Torphichen and County of Linlithgow. Business has been carried on in the above line for upwards of fifty years; and for a steady, good tradesman such an opening seldom occurs. For further particulars, apply to Mr. Wm. Shields, at Strathloanhead, by Avonbridge.

 A PUBLIC ROUP of the SMITHY TOOLS, &c, which belonged to the late Wm. Marshall, will take place at Strathloanhead, on Tuesday the 15th November current, at Twelve o'clock Noon.

M. CHAPMAN, Auctioneer.

 Strathloanhead, 2d Nov., 1859.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 17th November 1859

ASSESSED TAXES, 1859-60.

APPEAL COURTS-COUNTY OF STIRLING-

THE Commissioners of Supply for the several Districts of the County of Stirling will meet on the days, and at the places undermentioned, to hear and determine Appeals against the changes made by the Surveyor for the current year: -

For the Burgh and Parish of Falkirk, and the Parishes of Airth, Bothkennar, Larbert, Muiravonside, Polmont, and Slamannan - in the Court-House at Falkirk, on Wednesday the 30th of November current, at Twelve o'Clock Noon,

 JAMES CHRYSTAL, Clerk to the Commissioners. King Street, Stirling, 16th Nov., 1859.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 24th November 1859

LOST,

ON Wednesday the 16th current, between Polmont and Muiravonside, or between the latter place and Linlithgow Bridge, a SABLE BOA. –

Whoever has found the same will receive a suitable Reward, by returning it to Mrs. Reid, Smallburn House. Falkirk, 23d November, 1859.

AONBRIDGE

MELANCHOLY CIRCUMSTANCE.

On the evening of the 10th inst., a man named Thomas Rae, a labourer, residing near Avonbridge, retired to rest with a son about fourteen or fifteen years of age. On the following morning the son on wakening was horrified to find his father lying upon the floor of the apartment apparently lifeless, and a cat perched upon the body tearing away at the face of the unfortunate man. The young lad immediately arose, drove the cat off, discovered that his father was dead, and that the animal, with an instinct peculiar to its race, had succeeded in eating oft a part of the nose of the deceased. A.post mortem examination was held upon the body the same afternoon, when it was concluded that death had been caused by the bursting of a blood vessel.

Rae was 55 years of age.

 

 

 

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 22nd December 1859

BIRTHS

At Muiravonside Manse, on the 13th inst., the wife of the Rev. James McFarlan, of a daughter.

CORN STACKS, MILCH COWS, QUEYS, YOUNG HORSES, &c,

AT EASTER DRUMBROIDER, On SATURDAY, 24th DECEMBER.

TO be Sold by Public Roup, on Saturday the 24th December, 1859, on the Farm of Easter Drumbroider, near Avonbridge, possessed by Mr. Andrew Stevenson,

6 Large Stacks of Oats, part of which is crop 1858.

 2 Stacks of Barley.

 2 Stacks of Beans.

1 Rick of Ryegrass Hay.

4 Tons of Seeds Potatoes, Walker's Earlies.

A quantity of Turnips.

3 Ayrshire Milch Cows in Calf.

1 Farrow Cow.

2 Two-year-old Ayrshire Queys in Calf.

4 Six-quarter-old Ayrshire Queys.

4 Ayrshire Calves.

1 Two-year-old Draught Short-legged Clydesdale Colt.

1 Draught Foal,

 1 Iron Plough.

A Dreg Cart and Barrel, and a quantity of Farming Implements and Utensils, Dairy Dishes, &c, &c.

THREE MONTHS' CREDIT.

Roup to begin at Twelve o'clock precisely.

 JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

1860's

1860

 

Glasgow Herald Saturday 14th  January 1860

The Laurieston fox-hounds will meet on Monday the 16th January, at Avonbridge; Friday the 20th; at Maddiston-each morning at half-past ten o'clock.

 

Glasgow Herald 26th & 30th January 1860

The Laurieston fox-hounds will meet on Friday the 27th January, at Craigieburn ; Monday the 30th, at Maddiston; and Friday the 3d February, at Torwood Toll-each morning at half-past ten o'clock.

 

Falkirk Herald 2nd February & Glasgow Herald  2nd, 3rd,4th, 6th,February 1860

The Laurieston fox-hounds will meet on Monday the 6th February, at Maddiston; Friday the 10th, at Craigieburn; Monday the 13th, at Denny; Friday the 17th, at Slamannan Village-each morning at half-past ten o'clock.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 2nd 9th February 1860

CORN STACKS, MILCH COWS, PEATS, &c, AT MOSS-SIDE,

On MONDAY the 13th FEBRUARY.

TO be Sold by Public Roup, on Monday the 13th X February, 1860, on the Farm of Moss-Side, near Avonbridge, possessed by Mr. James Johnston,

4 Stacks of Oats,

 2 Ayrshire Milch Cows, near Calving,

1 Six-quarter-old Ayrshire Quey.

1 Ayrshire Calf,

1 Stack of Peats,

A Pair of Hand Fanners,

A Boiler and Furnace.

And a quantity of Dairy Dishes and Utensils.

 HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE, &c.

 THREE MONTHS' CREDIT.

Roup to begin at One o'clock Afternoon precisely.

 JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 9th February 1860

SHEEP-STEALING. –

On Tuesday night or Wednesday morning week, a sheep, the property of Mr. Wm. Cuthill, Gillandersland, parish of Muiravonside, was stolen from the flock and taken to an adjoining field, where it was slaughtered and carried off, with the exception of the fleece, head, and feet, which the thieves left on the spot, so as more easily, we would suppose, to escape detection. The authorities, though using every exertion to find out the delinquents, have hitherto been unable to bring home the perpetration of the crime to the offending parties.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 9th  23rd February 1860

MUIRAVONSIDE GRASS PARKS,

On SATURDAY, 25th FEBRUARY.

To be Let by Public Roup, on Saturday the 25th day of February, 1860,

THE GRASS PARKS on the Estate of Muiravonside,comprising ELEVEN ENCLOSURES, To be Let for Cattle, Sheep, and Horses, as formerly.

Roup to begin with the Parks at Drumbowie at One o'clock Afternoon, and to finish with the Parks at Seatrees, &c.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

GOWANBANK GRASS PARKS, AND LAND TO LET FOR LINT,

On SATURDAY, 25th FEBRUARY.

 TO be Let by Public Roup, on Saturday the 25th day of February, 1860, on the Lands of Gowanbank, near Avonbridge, belonging to the Trustees of the late Walter Gowans, Esq., 2 FIELDS of fine Feeding Pasture Grass - viz., 14 acres and 7 acres; and 1 FIELD of Young Grass for Hay, acres; also, I FIELD to be Let for being Cropped with Lint, 12 acres.

CREDIT TILL MARTINMAS ON BILLS.

Roup to begin at Half-past Eleven o'clock.

 JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Glasgow Herald, Caledonian Mercury, Morning Post, Wednesday 22nd , Fife Herald, Sheilds Daily Gazette, Thursday 23rd Newcastle Courant, Friday 24th , The Examiner Saturday 25th ,February 1860

SCOTCH BANKRUPTS.

(From the Edinburgh Gazette of Yesterday.)

SEQUESTRATIONS.

Feb. 18. DAVID TURNER, sometime farmer, Coxhill, in the parish of Muiravonside, in the county of Stirling, and now residing at Candiehead, in the said parish of Muiravonside, Creditors to meet within Stevenson's Rooms, 4 St. Andrew Square, Edinburgh, 28th February, at two o'clock.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 1st,8th, March 1860

MANUEL GRASS PARKS.

TO BE LET, for Pasture for the ensuing Season, on Wednesday the 14th of March next, SIX GRASS PARKS, On the Property of Manuel, in the Parish of Muiravonside. The Parks are of various sizes, and are all good Grass.

Roup to begin at Entryhead at One o'clock Afternoon.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 14th, March 1860

SCOTCH BANKRUPTS.

(From the Edinburgh Gazette of Yesterday.)

SEQUESTRATIONS.

EXAMINATIONS.

David Turner, sometime farmer, Coxhill in the parish of Muiravonside, in the county of Stirling, and new residing at Candiehead, in the said parish of Muiravonside, to be examined within the Sheriff Court Room, County Buildings, Lawnmarket, Edinburgh, 21st March, at twelve o'clock. Creditors to meet within the, Chambers of James Latta, chartered accountant, 32 India Street, Edinburgh, 30th March, at two o'clock.

 

Glasgow Herald Saturday 31st March 1860

The Laurieston fox-hounds will meet on Monday the 2d April, at Avonbridge: and Friday the 6th, at Torwood Toll-each morning at half-past ten o'clock.

 

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 5th April 1860

TOLLS TO LET.

To be Let by Public Roup, within Campbell's Golden Lion Hotel, Stirling, on Tuesday the 10th day of April, 1860, commencing at 11 o'clock Forenoon, for the Year from Whitsunday 1860 to Whitsunday 1861, THE TOLL DUTIES EXIGIBLE at the FOLLOWING BARS :-

  1. On the Road from Redrow to Peathill, &c. 1. The Bar at Dunipace Bridge, and other Bars and Side-bars connected therewith. 2. The Bar at Powmill. 3. The Bar at Higginsneuk Ferry.

Mr. James Monteith, Writer, Stirling, Clerk.

  1. On the Road from Bridge of Drip, by Blairdrummond, towards Doune and Callander; and from Blairdrummond, by Burnbank, to Bridge of Frew. 1. The Bar at Bridge of Drip, and Check-bars at Lochhills Wood and Kirklane. 2. The Bars at Frew.

Mr. P. J. Stirling, Writer, Dunblane, Clerk.

  1. On the Road from Parkend (near Polmont), by Kerse Bridge and Airth, leading to Alloa Ferry and Stirling. 1. Beancross Bar. 2. Kerse Bridge Tolls and Pontage. 3. Kersie Bar. And the following Bars on the Road from Dalgrain to Haining. 4. Dalgrain and Grangemouth Check-bars. 5. Avonbridge Bar.

Mr. J. Bruce, W.S., 38 Frederick Street, Edinburgh, Clerk.

  1. On the Road from Linlithgow Bridge to Stirling, and other Roads in the County of Stirling. 1. The Bar at Sheriffmuirlands, and Side-bar at Cornton Loan. 2. The Bar at St Ninians. 3. The Bar at Torwood. 4. The Bar at Laurieston. 5. The Bar at Linlithgow Bridge. 6. The Bars at Parkfoot and Bonnybridge. 7. The Bar at Queenzieburn. 8. The Bar at Kildean.

An Adjourned Meeting of the Trustees of the said Roads will be held within the Golden Lion Hotel, at Ten o'clock a.m. of said day.

Mr. John D. Mathie, Writer, Stirling, Clerk.

  1. On the Road from Burnbank to Thornhill and Port of Monteith. 1. The Bars at Port of Monteith. 2. The Bars at Thornhill, Mackeanston, and Cessentully.

Mr. John Maclaren, Middleton, Thornhill, Clerk.

  1. VI.On the Road from Crieff to Longcausewayhead, near Stirling. 1. The Bar at Muthill, and Check-bar at Bridgend of Crieff. 2. The Bar at Balhaldie, and Check-bar at Braco Village. 3. The Bar at Bridge of Allan, and Check-bar at Spittal.

Mr. P. J. Stirling, Writer, Dunblane, Clerk.

The Articles of Roup and Tables of Tolls for the above Bars respectively will be shown, and every information given, by the Clerks above-mentioned. And as those preferred to the Leases of the Tolls at the different Bars must find Caution for the Rents, immediately after the Roup, it is requested that Offerers will bring sufficient cautioners with them on the day of Roup, otherwise their offers will be rejected.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday12th July 1860

MARRIAGES

At Avonbridge,on the 2d inst by the Rev. William Eyval, Slamannan. Mr. JOHN BOYD, cooper, to JANE PATON.  reiict of the  late Thomas Forrester. The united ages of the bride and bridegroom nuinber 143 years.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday19th July 1860

JULY FAIR - 

This summer fair for cattle and horses was held on Thursday last, on the Callendar Riggs. Tbe supply of stock, as is always the case at the July market, was exceedingly scanty. There were few dealers on the ground. The cows exhibited however, were in excellent condition, but prices generally were back from those realised at the May fair. Calving cows were sold at prices ranging from £8 to £14, and an excellent Ayrshire, purchased from Mr. John Mitchell, Laurieston, by Mr. Andrew Liddell, brought £17. Mr. Gentleman, sold five excellent cows to a gentleman from Perth at £9 per head. Mr. Graham, Myothill; Mr. Henry Aitken, Avonbridge; and Mr Robert Davie, also sold cows, queys, and grazing cattle at remunerative prices. The horse market was considerably busier than might have been expected, and several fine animals changed owners. Serviceable work horses were sold at prices ranging from £15 to £35.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday20th July 1860

GOWANBANK CROP, On FRIDAY, 21st SEPTEMBER.

TO be Sold by Public Roup, on Friday the 21st September, 1860, on the Lands of Gowanbank, near Avonbridge, belonging to the Trustees of the late Walter Gowans, Esq.,

24 ACRES of OATS, and 8 ACRES of WHEAT.

The above Crops only require to be seen to be admired.

FOUR MONTHS' CREDIT ON BILLS.

Roup to begin at Two o'clock precisely.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

POTATOES AND OATS, AT DALQUAIRN,

On FRIDAY the 21st SEPTEMBER.

 TO be Sold by Public Roup, on Friday the 21st September, 1860, on the Rich Old Pasture Land of Dalquairn, near Avonbridge, possessed by Mr. Thomas McFarlane,

NINE ACRES OF POTATOES, which are the admiration of the district, and have been recommended to be entered for the Highland Society's Prize.

 also,

A LOT OF POTATO OATS, quite equal to the above, the usual credit.

Roup to begin at Half-past Five o'clock.

 JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Dumfries and Galloway Standard Wednesday 12th Stirling Observer, Dunfermline Press, Thursday 13th Dunfermline Saturday Press, Saturday 15th, September 1860

MARRIAGES

On the 6th instant, at Arngomery House, Stirlingshire, by the Rev. James M'Farlan, Muiravonside, the Rev. W. L. M'Farlan, minister of Tongland, Kirkcudbrightshire, to Isabella Leckie, second daughter of William Leckie Ewing, Esq. of Arngomery.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 4th,18th,25th October, 1st, 8th,16th 22nd November 1860

TO FARMERS.

DAVID BURNS, General Smith and Agricultural Implement Maker, Whitecross, Muiravonside, has much pleasure in returning his sincere thanks to his numerous Customers, and the Agricultural Public generally, for the kind patronage they have hitherto rendered him; and he hereby further intimates that he still continues to Manufacture and Repair all sorts of Farm Implements, at the most moderate charges; he hopes, by a regular personal attention to business, to receive a continuance of past favours. D. B. has much pleasure in introducing to the Agricultural Public his CAST STEEL MOULD-BOARDS for Ploughs, adapted for any soil; he feels assured these only require to be known to be duly appreciated - their lightness of draught, their cleaning properties, together with their durability, make them highly preferable to the Cast Iron Board. Numerous References can be made to parties using them.

Whitecross,

October, 1860.


Falkirk Herald Thursday 8th November 1860

THE LATE JAMES RUSSEL, ESQ. OF BLACKBRAES.

Now that the tremor in the public mind, caused by the announcement of this gentleman's demise, may be supposed to have subsided, and that the earth, scarce consolidated over the remains of the father, has just closed over those of the son, we should fail in our duty as local journalists were we to permit the sad event to pass without special record at our hands. By descent, on the maternal as on the paternal side, by birth, by early training, by engagement in the activities of business, and by connection with institutions, educational and charitable, Mr. Russel was, in the fullest sense of ttje term, a Falkirk man. Early in life it was intended he should have followed the legal profession, and with this view he attended law classes in Edinburgh University, where he became a distinguished student; but neither this success nor the large and lucrative practice in which his father was engaged, and to which he was naturally destined to succeed, sufficed to attach him permanently to a calling for which he felt himself by taste and temperament unsuited. Leaving the turmoil of legal practice for the quieter and more congenial duties of bank agent, Mr. Russel, whilst yet a very young man, received the appointment of manager of a branch in Falkirk of the Clydesdale Bank, and up till a recent date, when he resigned his office, he discharged its duties, at all times delicate in a small town, with a degree of discretion and courtesy which placed the branch on a firm footing and in a flourishing condition. For the last ten or twelve years Mr. Russel took the active management of several important undertakings in which his late father was concerned, and the success attendant upon these rendered his position one of affluent independence, with the prospect, or rather certainty, of realising at no distant date, a fortune of colossal dimensions. It is at this point in his career, with a bright, or we might say brilliant, future before him, and whilst still at the threshold of middle age, that we are called upon as a community to lament the loss of one whose abilities, acquirements, and amiable qualities peculiarly fitted him for a foremost place amongst the commoners of the land. The esteem in which Mr. Russel was held, and the deep and general feeling of regret with which his death is regarded, find testimony stronger than words of ours in the account which we subjoin of the funeral, and in the tribute, to which we here give place, paid to the deceased by Mr. Sheriff Robertson on opening his Court on Tuesday. As announced in our obituary of Thursday last, Mr. Russel expired at his residence, Arnotdale, on the morning of the 31st ult., and his remains were interred, on Tuesday last, in the family burial place in the parish churchyard, Muiravonside. The funeral cortege, consisting of nearly forty carriages, besides a numerous attendance of gentlemen on foot, left Arnotdale shortly after one o'clock, and proceeded slowly on its mournful journey. As a mark of respect, and as showing the general esteem, entertained for the deceased gentleman, the whole of the shops in the High Street were closed from one to two o'clock. The appearance of the public streets and the expression visible on the countenance of every person we met was that of pure and undisguised sympathy for the bereaved and regret for the departed. From the time the cortege left Arnotdale until it had passed a considerable distance beyond the town, the funeral bells, at measured intervals, pealed forth a mournful and impressive requiem.

 At the meeting of the Sheriff Court yesterday, Mr. Sheriff Robertson thus addressed the Bar, in reference to the late Mr. Russel, one of the interim Sheriff-Substitutes of the County : -Gentlemen, - Before commencing the business of this day, I should not do justice to my own feelings, and I think I would not do justice to yours, were I not to allude to the loss which we have all sustained, since we last met together, by the removal from amongst us of one universally esteemed and honoured, and who for years has occupied, as one of the Magistrates of Stirlingshire, and as one of the interim Sheriffs of this district, a seat on this bench. By the death of the late Mr. Russel of Blackbraes, this district and county has sustained a loss - which, standing by his grave yesterday, and thinking over all that he was, and all that, had Providence granted him longer life, he was likely to become -it is impossible to regard but as one of the heaviest which this district could sustain, and one which assuredly we can see no present probability of being repaired. Kindly, liberal, and enlightened, with the inclination and the power to do much good, no one has, in my memory, passed from amongst us, of whom it could more truly be said, that rarely has the tomb closed over one in whom there was so much to praise and so little to censure as the late James Russel. His early death, in the full possession of all his intellectual gifts, and in the exercise of his benevolent disposition, and just as a wider sphere and greater means of usefulness had opened to him - is one of those mysterious dispensations of the Divine will which our present limited faculties are unable to understand or explain, and which only tends to convince us of the perfect truth of the words of the great apostle to the Gentiles, when he says, "that now we see through a glass darkly." To you, gentlemen, who knew Mr. Russel from youth to manhood, and who are perfectly conversant with all his merits, his gentleness, his judicious benevolence, his unassuming simplicity of character and manner, it would be idle to dilate upon his many virtues; but I am sure that I only give utterance to your sentiments  - indeed, I may say the universal opinion of this town and neighbourhood, when I say that, since the death of his father, on the 4th of February, 1808, no death has occurred in this district or county which will be more widely felt or more sincerely lamented

ROBERT ADAM,Esq. of Springbank, rose and said As the senior member of the Faculty of Procurators present in Court to-day, I rise to express my entire concurrence, and, I am sure, the entire concurrence of the whole members of this Faculty, in the observations which have now fallen from your Lordship, and which, I am sure, will meet with the unanimous approval of all who knew the late Mr. Russel, and had an opportunity of estimating and appreciating his character and conduct through life.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 15th,22nd ,Stirling Observer 29th November 1860

ASSESSED TAXES-1860-61-

THE Commissioners of Supply for the several District of the County of Stirling, will meet on the days and at the places undermentioned, to hear and determine Appeals against the charges made by the Surveyor for the current year: -

For the District of FALKIRK, comprehending the Burgh and Parish of Falkirk, and Parishes of Airth, Bothkenner, Larbert, Muiravonside, Polmont, and Slamannan, - in the Red Lion Hotel Falkirk, on Tuesday, the 4th December next, at Twelve o Clock Noon.

 

 

 

 

 

1861

Falkirk Herald Thursday 31st January 1861

GRASS TO LET, BY PRIVATE BARGAIN.

To be Let for Pasture, for the Season from the Ist of May 1861 to Martinmas 1861, THE LANDS of SUMMERHOUSE, as sometime possessed by Mr. David Steel, extending to about 102 acres, reserving therefrom the Lands and Houses East of the public road leading from Balmitchell to Crossroads; and also the PLANTING and SMALL PARK adjoining, West of the public road, the reserved Lands extending to about 30 acres. and also,

The LANDS of CROSSHILL, as sometime possessed by Mr. Robert Johnston, extending to about 80 acres, reserving Crosshill House and Yard. If desired, the New Grass on these Lands, extending to about 50 acres, may be cut for Hay before the 15th July 1861, and afterwards pastured. The Lands are situated about four miles south of Falkirk, and one mile west of Avonbridge Station of Monkland Railways.

Apply to William Storie, Writer in Falkirk.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 7th February 1861

LOCAL INTELLIGENCE.

THE MILITIA. –

The Stirlingshire Militia are to be immediately disembodied, having been recalled in divisions from their present quarters to Stirling for the purpose. The regiment numbers about 700 men.

The Rev. JAMES MUIR acknowledges the receipt of one pound sterling from a gentleman in or near Avonbridge, signing himself "Garibaldi," and to be devoted to the circulation of Bibles in Italy.

Mr. M. has to-day forwarded the above sum to the proper quarter.

WINTER FAIR

The winter fair for cattle and horses was held on Thursday, on the usual stance in the Callendar Riggs . The stock exhibited was very limited m point of numbers, though, all things considered, in fair condition. A considerable number of farmers, dealers and others were in attendance, but the amount of business transacted was short of what might have been expected. The market was far from being a brisk one-intending purchasers not coming up to the prices asked for their stock by sellers. Indeed, it was apparent that a fall in the price of cattle is looked for. The reason of this state of matters is obvious the weather having set in fresh for the last few weeks, and turnips and straw being abundant. These facts seemed to weigh in the minds of buyers, and caused them to be shy in striking bargains. Upon the whole, it  was a dull market, and speaking generally, not in favour of the exposer. Calving cows and grass beasts, however, we may state, were in fair demand. Messrs Liddle and Graham, Denny ; Messrs Gentleman, Avonbridge ; Mr. H. Aitken, Foggermountain;  Mr. Rennie, Gartcows, and other local dealers, were upon the ground and showed, as usual, some fine milch cows. We observed also several dealers from Edinburgh. These, however, did not purchase to any great extent. The horse market was somewhat brisk, and good draught houses were in demand. The show of animals in this department was superior to what is generally seen at a winter Falkirk fair. For good draught, prices would average £30 to £40, and others at corresponding prices according to quality and conditions. Few saddle or harness were shown. At the close of the market, over the general stock, a clearance was not efffected.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 28th February, 14th March 1861

MANUEL GRASS PARKS.

TO be LET, for Pasture for the ensuing Season, on Tuesday the 19th of March next, SIX GRASS PARKS on the Property of Manuel, in the Parish of Muiravonside. The Parks are of various sizes, and are all good Grass.

Roup to begin at Entryhead at Twelve o'clock Noon.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

23d February, 1861.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 28th February, 7th March 1861

MUIRAVONSIDE GRASS PARKS

On TUESDAY, 12th MARCH.

TO be Let by Public Roup, on Tuesday the 12th day of March, 1861, the GRASS PARKS on the Estate of Muiravonside, comprising

ELEVEN ENCLOSURES.

To be Let for Sheep, Cattle, and Horses, as formerly.

Roup to begin with the Parks at Drumbowie, at One o'clock Afternoon, and to finish with the Parks at Seatrees, &c.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald 21st March 1861

District Intelligence

MUIRAVONSIDE.

School Examination.

The Parochial School of Muiravonside was on Tuesday examined by a committee of the Presbytery of Linlithgow, consisting of the Revs. Mr. Begg, Falkirk; Mr. Kerr, Polmont; Mr. Oswald, Camelon: and Mr. M'Farlane, Muiravonside. We also observed Mrs. Stirling of Muiravonside, and Miss Stirling; Miss M'Arthur, and Mr. M'Laren, mission agent, Blackbraes. The school was more numerously attended than formerly, and a marked improvement was apparent in the style of English reading, and also in orthography. At the close the Rev. Mr. Begg delivered a suitable address to the scholars. We may mention that Mrs. Stirling kindly treated each of the pupils, after the examination was over, to a bun, which they received with evident marks of satisfaction. The female school at Maddiston was examined upon the same day, and the rev. gentlemen expressed themselves satisfied with the manner in which the pupils acquitted themselves.

CHEAP WEEKLY NEWSPAPER, FOR THE COUNTY OF LINLITHGOW.

On SATURDAY the 18th MAY, 1861, PRICE ONE PENNY, will be issued, the first number of THE BATHGATE EXPRESS, AND CHRONICLE FOR THE COUNTY OF LINLITHGOW: A News Register for Bathgate, Linlithgow, Bo'ness, Carriden, Torphichen, Armadale, Whitburn, Longridge, Crofthead, Greenburn, Blackburn, Livingston, Dechmont, Houston, Uphall, Broxburn, Dalmeny, Carriden, Torphichen, Armadale, Whitburn, Longridge, Airdrie, Coatbridge, Falkirk, Blackbraes, East, West, and Mid-Calder, &c. Queensferry, Kirkliston, Avonbridge, Slamannan, and etc. and etc. ( the report blabbers on about nothing of interest really.)

 

Caledonian Mercury, Glasgow Herald, Wednesday 27th, Dunfermline Press Thursday 28th,Dundee Courier, Carlisle Journal, Friday 29th, Perry’s Bankrupt Gazette Saturday 30th March, Sheilds Daily Gazette Thursday 4th April 1861

SCOTS BANKRUPTS.

SEQUESTRATIONS

George Husband Baird Brock, otherwise George Baird Brock, miller and farmer at Manuel Mill, in the parish of Muiravonside, and county of Stirling- creditors meet in the Blue Bell Inn in Falkirk, 4th April, two o'clock-

John Smith & Wilson, writers, Falkirk, agents.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 2nd May 1861

AVONBRIDGE.

Mr. Dick's School.-

We have had the following handed to us, which we willingly print : -

Muiravonside Manse, 24th April, 1861. - Having lately  examined Avonbridge School, as taught by Mr. Dick, with Rev. Messrs Home and M'Laren, on the part of the Presbytery of Linlithgow, we were exceedingly pleased with the orderly conduct of the children, with their accurate and extensive knowledge of Bible history, and excellent appearance on the Catechism. Their reading and pronunciation was generally good, and they were well grounded in the meaning of what they read. Their proficiency in geography and arithmetic was fair, and we have good wishes for the prosperity of the school.

JAMES M'FARLANE, minister.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 16th 23rd May 1861

DESIRABLE RESIDENCE TO BE LET ON LEASE,

FURNISHED, With Entry at Whitsunday 1861.

THE MANSION-HOUSE of CANDIE, with good Garden, excellent Offices, and Right of Shooting over above 200 acres (pasture fields, if desired). The House, which is partly modern and well Furnished, consists of Dining-room, Drawing-room, and five good Bed-rooms, besides Kitchen and Servants' accommodation. The situation commands an extensive prospect over the surrounding country, and both sides of the Frith of Forth. Distance from Linlithgow five miles, Falkirk six miles, and Polmont Junction Railway Station three and a half miles. The Parish Church of Muiravonside is within three miles.

For further particulars application may be made to T. H. Ferrier, Esq., W.S., 136 Princes Street, Edinburgh.

Edinburgh, 10th May, 1861.

 

Falkirk Herald 8th August 1861

GROWING POTATOES FOR SALE, AT CROSSCROES, NEAR BLACKBRAES, On MONDAY, 12th AUGUST, 1861. TO be Sold by Public Roup, at Crosscroes, near Blackbraes, on Monday the 12th August, 1861, belonging to Mr Andrew Muirhead - About FIVE ACRES OF POTATOES, WALKERS EARLIES. The above are a particularly fine Crop, a proportion of which having grown upon ground which has not been broke up for many years. To parties wishing a change, they will be found peculiarly well adapfed for Seed. To be put up in Lots to suit purchasers. THE USUAL TERMS. Sale to commence at Half-past Five o'clock Afternoon. WM. GILLESPIE, Auctioneer.

HAY AND POTATOES AT PARKHEAD, belonging to Mr John Barclay.

About 1400 STONES of RYEGRASS and CLOVER HAY,

and TWO ACRES of POTATOES,

 on Thursday the 22d August, 1861.

For particulars, see future Advertisement.

WM. GILLESPIE, Auctioneer.

 SUNNYSIDE POTATOES,

 BELONGING to Mr John Brock, on Friday the 23d August,-1861.

 For particulars, see future Advertisement.

 WM. GILLESPIE, Auctioneer.

GROWING OATS FOR SALE,

AT TORAVON, near Maddiston,

on Saturday, 24th August, 1861.

For particulars, see future Advertisement.

WM. GILLESPIE, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald 15th & 22nd August 1861

Mr. Gillespie's Sales.

SALE THIS EVENING.

HAY & POTATOES FOR SALE, AT PARKHEAD,

On THURSDAY, 22d AUGUST, 1861.

TO be Sold by Public Roup, at Parkhead, on Thursday the 22d August, 18G1, belonging to Mr John Barclay –

About 1400 STONES of RYEGRASS and CLOVER HAY, in Ricks ; also,

TWO ACRES of POTATOES, Walker's Earlies.

The Hay has been secured in first-rate condition, and the Potatoes a fair average Crop.

THE USUAL CREDIT GIVEN.

Sale to commence with the Hay at 5 o'clock P.M. and with the Potatoes at 6.

WM. GILLESPIE, Auctioneer.

GROWING POTATOES FOR SALE, AT SUNNY SIDE,

On FRIDAY, 23d AUGUST, 1861. TO be Sold by Public Roup, at Sunnyside, on Friday the 23d August, 1861, belonging to Mr. John Brock,

A FIELD OF POTATOES,

An Extraordinary Fine Crop, and very Early.

To be put up in Lots to suit Purchasers.

THE USUAL TERMS.

Sale to commence at Six o'clock Evening.

WM. GILLESPIE, Auctioneer,

GROWING OATS FOR SALE,

AT TORAVON, near MADDISTON,

On SATURDAY the 24th AUGUST, 1861.

TO be Sold by Public Roup, at Toravon, near Maddiston, on Saturday, 24th August, 1861,

ABOUT SEVEN ACRES of GROWING OATS,

A Splendid Crop.

THE USUAL CREDIT GIVEN.

To be put up in Lots to suit Purchasers.

Sale to commence at Five o'clock Afternoon. WM. GILLESPIE, Auctioneer.

Mr. Neilson’s  Sales

THE WHOLE GROWING CROP AND HAY ON THE FARM OF CRAIGS,

On WEDNESDAY, 28th AUGUST.

 To be Sold by Public Roup, on the 28th August, 1861, on the Farm of Craigs, Rumford, possessed by Mr. Robert Stirling, the whole GROWING CROP and HAY on the above Farm, comprisingc –

14 Acres of Oats,

2 Acres of Beans,

 1 Acre of Barley,

 and 300 Stones of Ryegrass and Clover Hay.

The Crops are well known in the district, and require no further commendation.

 The whole to be sold without reserve as the Exposer is leaving the Farm.

FOUR MONTHS' CREDIT.

Roup to begin at Two o'clock precisely.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 27th June 1861

LOCAL INTELLIGENCE.

Caution to Bathers. - On Thursday the 2d inst., two men, Wm. Taylor and John Hodge, servants to Mr. Andrew Reid, Haining Valley, went into the Union Canal at Muiravonside "Stop Gate," to bathe. Hodge was nearly drowned; but Mr. James Robert, gardener to the Rev. Mr M'Farlane, happened to come up at the time. He at once leapt in - all his clothes on, from hat to boots - and took him out very much exhausted. Taylor could swim, and got out safely himself. Great credit is due to Mr. Robert for his prompt exertions, which, we are glad to know, were so successful.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 27th June 1861

AGRICULTURAL AFFAIRS. –

The weather now is everything that could be desired, copious showers and genial sunshine being the prevailing characteristics. Under such favouring influences vegetation is assuming vigorous proportions, and the crops are making rapid progress. Wheat appears, upon the whole, strong and luxuriant; barley is showing a healthy breadth, and is coming rapidly into ear; oats also bids fair for a good crop; beans are in bloom, and the fragrance from the fields as the traveller passes by is very agreeable. This crop, however, will not equal anything like an average yield. Potatoes are filling the drills well, and promise to be an abundant crop. The turnip fields present a very excellent appearance. Ryegrass, which in some instances is already being cut, is better than was anticipated some time ago, yet taken as a whole the hay crop will not equal the average of many previous years. This is owing, no doubt, to the long continued drought. The gardens in the town and neighbourhood are looking well, but there will be a great deficiency in fruit generally - the opening blossoms having been nipped by the protracted frosty mornings.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 8th 15th August 1861

OATS, BARLEY, HAY, AND POTATOES

AT MANUEL MILL, On TUESDAY, 20th AUGUST.

TO be Sold by Public Roup, on Tuesday the 20th X August, 1861, on the Lands of Manuel Mill, possessed by Mr. George R Brock, the following very Excellent Crops of OATS, BARLEY, HAY and POTATOES, comprising 7 Acres of Oats. 3 Acres of Barley, 700 Stones of Clover and Ryegrass Hay, in Ricks, and 2 Acres of Potatoes. The Crops are in every way most abundant, and will be sold in Lots without reserve. Four Months' Credit given on Bills, or Discount for Cash.

Roup to begin at Two o'clock precisely.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

3000 STONES OF HAY, AT BOWHOUSE, On TUESDAY, 2th AUGUST.

TO be Sold by Public Roup, on Tuesday the 20th August, 1861, on the Farm of Bowhouse, on the Estate of Muiravonside, possessed by Mr. John Binnie: - 

THREE THOUSAND STONES OF Splendidly-got RYEGRASS and CLOVER HAY, in 15 Ricks.

Four months' credit.

Roup to begin at Four o'clock precisely.

 JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Dundee Courier Tuesday 13th August 1861

CONFERENCE OF PAROCHIAL BOARD REPRESNTATIVES ON THE LUNACY ACT.

A meeting of representatives from various Parochial Boards in Scotland, was held on Saturday, by invitation from the City Parochial Board of Edinburgh, in the chapel of the City Poorhouse to consider the amendments required by the state of the various parishes on the present Lunacy Act and to take such steps as might be thought proper to bring the views expressed at the meeting under the notice of the Legislature. There was an attendance of about 90 or 100 gentlemen, including representatives from the Parochial Boards of the City. St Cuthbert 's and Canongate (Edinburgh); City, and Barony Glasgow; Brechin, Cupar-Fife, Dundee, Dunfermline, and Scoonie, &c. Bailie Blackadder, chairman of the City Parochial Board, Edinburgh, was called to the chair. Inspector George Greig was appointed clerk. The Chairman said there were several provisions in the present Act which required amendment for the public interest; and the great object which they had in view, and which they ought always to keep in view, was to get the provisions of the Act placed upon such a footing as would be most conducive to the interests and comfort of the pauper lunatics belonging to their several parishes, and then, that this should be accomplished with as little expense to the ratepayers as possible. Letters sympathising with the object of the meeting, and expressing regret at inability to be present, were read or intimated from Lord Kinnaird, Mr. Maxwell of Munches, &c. Lord Kinnaird, as well as several of the other correspondents, stated that he thoroughly concurred in the proposal that the Board of Supervision should have the entire control over the management of the lunatic poor. Bailie Macnab, Leith, moved the first resolution, as follows. -  “That in the opinion of this meeting the Lunacy Act 20 and 21 Vic, cap. 71, is most imperfect in its provisions and in many of its clauses injudicious and prejudicial both to the poor brought under its operation and to the public interest." In supporting the resolution Bailie Macnab expressed his belief that the duty of superintending the care and management of pauper lunatics throughout the country might with all safety be left in the hands of the Board of Supervision. (Applause.) Mr. F. Molison of Mayfield, chairman of the Dundee Parochial Board, seconded the resolution. He cordially agreed in what had been said as to the competency of the accommodation and arrangements existing in connection with most of the poorhouses for the care of the pauper lunatics of the parish. He was speaking from personal observation when he said that a large proportion of lunatic paupers at present confined in asylums were so quiet and harmless that they might be left perfectly well under the care of the Board of Supervision, as they used to be. (Hear.) Permission was given some time ago by the Board of Supervision to the Board of which he was chairman to erect wards to contain forty of such lunatics in their poorhouse; and after they were erected, they applied to the Lunacy Board for a license, but were refused. The result was that, after incurring a large expense for buildings, they had a large number of lunatics in asylums at a great and totally unnecessary expense, under the care of the Lunacy Board, (Hear.) Mr. Molison next referred to the great expense and trouble consequent upon the necessity, according to the present law, of bringing the lunatic before a Sheriff, and after undergoing several inquiries and formalities, getting a warrant for his confinement. This provision called for some reform in a new bill. The next matter to which he took exception was the interference of the Lunacy Board with the payments to be made to the lunatic asylums by the Parochial Boards for the keep of their pauper lunatics. He thought the committee of the Parochial Board and the managers of the Asylum were quite competent to settle that matter. He thoroughly concurred with what had been said by Bailie Macnab as to the confidence which ought to be reposed in the Board of Supervision in reference to this matter. Let the Board of Supervision be the authority with whom the Parochial Boards had to deal, and he was quite sure that there would be no well-founded complaints with regard to the management and care of the lunatic poor. (Applause ) Mr. I. Bayley, W.S. representative ot the parish of Muiravonside, said a case had come under his own knowledge illustrative of the expense to which parishes were sometimes put, in order to apprehend "dangerous lunatics" and get them lodged in an asylum. In this case a drunken, worthless fellow, who was sane enough when he kept from drink, had been twice apprehended and cognosced before the Sheriff within twelvemonths, at an expense of L.22 each time the parish. After a drinking bout he had an attack of delirium tremens, and became excited and "dangerous;" and after being brought before the Sheriff he was sent to the Dundee Asylum. He was dismissed in six weeks perfectly well; but in the course of a month or two he again fell into drink, relapsed into mania, and the apprehension and examination had to be gone through over again at an expense to the parish of L.22 more. (Hear, hear, and laughter.) The resolution was then adopted by acclamation. Mr. M'lnnes, Abbey Parish, Paisley, moved the second resolution, as follows: — "That the real interests both of the poor and ratepayers require that the whole question of the treatment of the insane be reconsidered, and that a statute ought to be passed dealing equitably with the interests of all, and this after due investigation and deliberation. Mr. Hay, writer, Dundee, had pleasure in seconding the motion of Mr. M'lnnes. He might say that there was no desire on the part of the Parochial Boards to curtail the proper treatment of the poor, quite the contrary. Most, however, were agreed as to the imperfections of the Lunacy Act, but when it was considered in what manner it was passed, there need be no surprise as to the imperfections. It was based on the report of Lunacy Commissioners, whose data has now been shown, at least to a large extent, to have been erroneous, and many of the facts highly coloured. No one could read the masterly and unanswerable refutation of that report by Sir John M'Neill, without seeing the errors on which the Commissioners proceeded. The bill, besides, was very hurriedly passed through Parliament. (Hear, hear.) Such being the Act we are considering, it was fairy open to criticism. It did not follow that we were antagonistic in the matter to the Lord Advocate—he received suggestions from any public body on all subjects on which legislation was desired. He considered the views suggested by the different parties, and did what he thought best in the circumstances; and he had no doubt His Lordship was open to consider whatever suggestions the Parochial Boards made on this important question. (Hear, hear.) That there was great injustice under the present Act both as to the poor and the public he had no doubt; and in corroboration of what was said by Mr. Molison, chairman of the Dundee Board, and also by the mover of the first resolution, he would instance the fact that Dr. Coxe, one of the Lunacy Commissioners, in his recent inspections, in writing recommended the Superintendent of the Dundee Lunatic Asylum to endeavour to have a number of the patients there confined sent to be boarded in the country. The Doctor further stated that a great number of the inmates of that Asylum, which is one of the old-established institutions, were of an incurable nature and harmless, and to whom no good could arise by their being continued in that curative establishment, while their removal would give room for the recent cases requiring such treatment. Now, all this showed the necessity of having the insane properly classified, so that the public should not be called on unnecessarily to pay a very high board for the poor who required safe custody merely. (Hear, hear.) It also proved the impropriety of erecting throughout the country large curative asylums in the meantime, until this whole question was properly investigated and discussed. (Hear, hear.) That there will be a classificationof some kind was clear, and many of these buildings might be made of a less expensive kind, and suitable for such purposes. The question would also arise how far it was sound policy to congregate together all classes of insane in large asylums. Take the cases of simple-minded, harmless people. These, by being closed up in such places with raving maniacs, as referred to by Bailie M'Nab, would become worse instead of better— (hear, hear)— and he thought that something of the home-training system might be found the more preferable, where harmless imbeciles might by mingling with the family be better and more advantageously located. In any view, it was unnecessary to charge the public assessments with sums of from L.20 to L.26 a-year for keeping a class of poor who did not  require the lunatic asylum treatment. (Hear hear.) Then it was said that the Lunacy Act expired in 1863; but that was not so. The Board only ceased, but their duties were transferred to the lunacy inspectors. That was much worse, for just now we have a board in Scotland to deal with, but after 1863 the inspectors are to have irresponsible powers, only to be controlled by the Secretary of State in London. (Hear, hear.) Now, he thought this was a strong instance of that sort of legislation which removed from the country the control by localities of the management of their local rates and affairs; and in any amendment of the Act this ought to be opposed. (Hear, hear.) Considerable difficulty occurred in practice as to the term "lunatic." The word in the Lunacy Act is restrictive, as there must be some danger to the safety of the person himself or to the public apprehended before he could come under the term. The Board of Supervision took the opinion of counsel on the subject, and the present Lord Justice-Clerk and the Lord Advocate were of opinion that the definition was attended with difficulty ; but they were clear that it did not include parties who, from weakness or facility of mind, were unable to manage their own affairs. But the Lunacy Commissioners tried to get the better of all such difficulties by having inserted in the bill, a few days ago withdrawn from Parliament, two lines to the effect that all persons were lunatics under the statute who were not of sound mind. (Hear, hear.) Now, that clause had little connection with the general context of the abandoned bill, but it just showed how necessary it was for all parochial boards to watch all r(L?)egislation on this question. He would only farther refer to the question of dangerous lunatics. He had no objections to the Procurator-Fiscal investigating such cases. But if it was put as a question of the public safety as stated by Mr. M'lnnes, then clearly the public ought to bear the expenses. (Hear, hear.) It was unfair in parishes where any such party might be apprehended, to force them to pay the heavy expenses, and the subsequent support of the individuals. It may be that he had only been an hour in the parish, and it was unjust to subject it to such a burden for the public interest. In addition to the cases of the nature mentioned, he knew a very bad case a few months ago: — An Englishman, stout and able- bodied, happened to be passing through a parish in the north of Scotland, and frightened a woman in a barn, when the police constable was called in, and the Englishman was brought in custody to the county town, a distance of forty miles. The Fiscal petitioned the Sheriff to have him declared a lunatic, and it was done, and he was removed a distance of 160 miles to a lunatic asylum in this county, where he now was at the expense of this Highland parish, which, besides being obliged to support this stranger, it may be for forty years, was found liable to the Fiscal in all expenses besides. All the while, the man was not truly of the character which requires his detention. Such cases are of common occurrence; and it was the abuse of the clause to which complaint has been made, and in any amendment of the Act it ought to be rearranged. He begged most cordially to second the resolution. The motion was then put, and carried unanimously. Bailie Johnston, St Cuthbert's Board, moved the third resolution as follows: — "That for these purposes it is most important that the Parochial Boards of Scotland unite, so that by joint action a proper legislative enactment may be obtained in next session of Parliament." Mr. Deas, Kirkcaldy, seconded the resolution, which was likewise unanimously adopted. Mr. Ewing, Barony Parish, Glasgow, moved: — " That a committee be appointed for the purpose of collecting information from the county authorities and parochial boards on the subject, and to prepare the heads of a measure which, while it would secure the due treatment of the insane poor, would at the same time meet the wishes of the country, to be submitted to another general meeting, to be afterwards called." This motion having been agreed to, a general committee was appointed, among whose members are Lord Kinnaird; Sir J. G. Baird, Bart. ; Mr. Maxwell, of Munches; Mr. Mollison, Dundee; and Mr. Hay, Dundee; Bailie Urquhart, Aberdeen; and Provost Whitelaw, Dunfermline.

The proceedings then terminated.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 29th August 1861

Sheriff Summary Court. -The following cases, since our last publication, have been disposed of before Mr. Sheriff Robertson: -

Mary Brannan or M'Vey, and Mary Bryson or Sweenie, both from Crownerland, Muiravonside, we're placed at the bar, charged with the theft of a quantity of coals from off the Slamannan and Bo’ness Railway. The accused pled guilty, and after a suitable admonition from the bench, were each sentenced to be imprisoned for ten days, or pay a fine of 10s.

James Baird, mason, Maddiston pled guilty to the charge of assault, and was sentenced to pay a fine of 25s, or the alternative of twenty-five days' imprisonment.

Thomas Hamilton, miner, Maddiston, charged with assault and breach of the peace, pled guilty and was sentenced to be imprisoned for twenty days, or pay a fine of 20s.

John Todd, miner, Maddiston, accused of assault, pled guilty, and was sentenced to pay a fine of 20s, or be imprisoned for twenty-five days.

 

Caledonian Mercury Tuesday 17th September 1861

STIRLING CIRCUIT COURT. Yesterday, the Circuit Court of Justiciary sat at Stirling for the trial of criminal cases. The L.ord Justice-Clerk was the judge. Alexander Burns Shand, Esq., officiated as Advocate- depute. The following cases were brought before their Lordships:-

THEFT BY HOUSEBREAKING.

William White and Michael McCann were charged –

(1.) with having, on the 9th of July 1861, stolen from the house of Newcraig Cottage, occupied by Cecilia Raffan or Nasmyth, widow, a pair of trousers, belonging to Alexander Nasmyth, engineer, her son;

(2.) with having, on 31st August 1861, broken into the house near the policy grounds of Lawrence Park, Muiravonside, occupied by Charles Rankin, gardener, and stealing various articles. The charge against White was aggravated by two previous conviction sunder the name of James Davie, before the Sheriff Courts of Berwickshire and Haddingtonshire. The prisoners pleaded guilty. William White was sentenced to penal servitude for six years, and Michael M 'Cann to 18 months' imprisonment.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 19th September 1861

STIRLING AUTUMN CIRCUIT COURT.

The Stirling Circuit Court sat in the Justiciary Court-room there on Monday and Tuesday last-the Lord Justice-Clerk presiding. Alexander Bums Shand, Esq., Advocate-Depute. His Lordship arrived from Edinburgh by the 10.30 train on Monday and, proceeded by the Provost and Magistrate and other civic officials, proceeded to Mr. Campbell's Royal Hotel where a guard of honour of the 42nd Highlander under the command of Captain McPherson, Lietenant Farquharson, V.C., and Lieutenant Baille was drawn up. The Provost and Magistrates, the military, with the Castle band, accompanied his Lordship to the Court House. The Court was opened with prayer by the Rev. Mr. Wilson, of the North Established Church, when the following cases were called: -

THEFT BY HOUSEBREAKING.

William White and Michael M'Cann were charged (1) with having, on 9th July, 1861house of Newcraig Cottage, occupied by Cecelia Raffan or Nasmyth, widow, a pair of trousers, belonging to Alexander Nasmyth, engineer, her son; (2) with having on 3d August 1881 broken into the house near the policy grounds of Lawrence Park, Muiravonside, occupied by Charles Rankin, gardener, by breaking a pane of glass in a window, and introducing their hand and removing the snib or fastening in the inside, and then opening the window and entering, and stealing three coats or thereby, a vest, two handkerchiefs, a pair of mittens and 2s 6d in silver belonging to Chas. Rankin; as also a pocket-bible belonging to Elizabeth Young, servant of Major-General James Kerr Ross, Lawrence Park; as also from a lockfast chest in the house which they opened by means of a false key or picklock, or the true key which they stole for the purpose, a pocketbook five £1 notes, and 25s in silver, belonging to Rankin. The charge against White was aggravated by two previous convictions under the name of James Davie before the Sheriff Courts of Berwickshire and Haddingtonshire. The prisoners pled guilty. William White was sentenced to six years' penal servitude, and Michael M'Cann to eighteen months' imprisonment.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 24th October 1861

TURNIPS AT BOWHOUSE,

MUIRAVONSIDE, On WEDNESDAY, 30th OCTOBER,

TO be Sold by Public Roup, on Wednesday, 30th October, 1861, on the Farm of Bowhouse, upon the Estate of Muiravonside, possessed by Mr. John Binnie, FOUR ACRES of Aberdeen Yellow TURNIPS,

The Crop of which is an honour to the Parish.

THREE MONTHS' CREDIT.

Roup to begin at Four o'clock precisely.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 21st November 1861

LINLITHGOW

LINLITHGOW UNION POORHOUSE AND THE ENFORCEMENT OF THE TEST.

 "A Ratepayer,"  writing to the Scotsman in favour of rigorously enforcing the poorhouse test in order to reduce pauperism, refers in this manner to the Linlithgow Union Poorhouse : -

 "Permit me to observe that it appears, from the last report to Parliament on the pauperism of the three kingdoms, that while there has been a decided decrease of registered poor in Ireland, there has been none in England and Scotland, a result which has been in like manner ascribed by a writer in a leading London journal to the strict enforcement of the workhouse test on the former portion of the United Kingdom. It is true that none of our poorhouses can contain the whole poor on the roll of the parish; but it is notorious and much to be regretted that many of the berths are not occupied so far as they can be so with propriety. Take, for example, the Union Poorhouse lately erected at Linlithgow by the parishes of Linlithgow, Borrowstouness, Bathgate, Whitburn, Carriden, Kirkliston, Muiravonside, and Abercorn, at a cost of not under £10,000, and which has been in operation for some years past. In 1860, the parish of Linlithgow, with a roll of 216 registered paupers and 70 berths in the house, had only an average for the year of 38 inmates, thus leaving 32 berths unoccupied ; Borrowstouness, with 122 registered paupers and 61 berths, bad 8 occupied, leaving 53 vacant; Bathgate, with 144 paupers and 42 berths, had 25 occupied, leaving 17 unoccupied; Whitburn, with 62 paupers and 25 berths, had 12 in the house, 13 being unoccupied; Carriden, with 64 paupers and 20 berths, had 4 occupied, leaving 16 vacant; Kirkliston, with 76 paupers and 20 berths, had 7 occupied and 13 unoccupied; Abercorn, with 35 paupers and 9 berths, had none occupied ; and Muiravonside, with 44 paupers and 15 berths, had 3 occupied, leaving 12 berths vacant. From this it appears that, while the house contains accommodation for 262 ordinary paupers, the average number of berths occupied during the year specified was 97, leaving vacant 165, which could surely have been easily filled by a selection from the 666 out-door paupers. It is true that during the current year the house has been better filled, but it is still unoccupied to the extent of one half of the berths. It may hardly be observed that the main objects of these institutions are to remove the poor from their filthy and miserable abodes, and to secure them a comfortable home, to prevent the generation and spread of disease, to prevent those misapplications of relief which generally accompany the out-door relief system, to educate the pauper children, and rear them with sound constitutions, and in habits of industry and morality, and especially to test the honesty of those claiming parish relief; and if such be the case, although a few vacant berths should be kept in reserve for this last purpose, yet to secure the thorough working of the establishment the berths should be filled up at least to the portion required as a test, so far as there are out-door paupers to occupy the berths. Undoubtedly, the practice of administering out door relief in so many cases proceeds from amiable but misdirected feelings, which should not be exercised at the expense of the wellworking of the establishment, both within and without doors. There is no reason why the Scotch paupers should be treated more tenderly than the Irish; and if a contrary rule is to be continued by our Parochial Boards, the cost of the poorhouses might as well have been saved. It was well observed by Dr Wood "that there was something radically wrong in our administration, and that it was a hard thing that those who were working for their bread by honest labour should be made to pay so large a sum for the maintenance of those who preferred to eat the bread of idleness and dissipation to the bread of honest labour, and the bread gained by the sweat of their brow." In the Linlithgow combination poorhouse there are 55 children, all carefully tended in every point of view. Upwards of 30 of the boys are exercised in gymnastics and military drill, and those of sufficient age are apprenticed to trades. Nor is the education of the girls in every department suitable for their condition in life neglected. While such is the case, it is to be feared that many of the children connected with the parishes of this Union, in place of participating in these advantages, are scattered about wherever they can be boarded, and where neither their comforts, education, nor morality can be properly secured, and where many of them may pursue a little begging trade perhaps under the eyes of those with whom they reside.

 

Falkirk Herald 28th November

Local Intelligence

Coal-pit Accident. –

 About ten o'clock on Monday forenoon, a man, named Alexander Ure, thirty-four years of age, residing at Maddiston, met with an accident while employed at his usual avocation, in Mungallrigg Ironstone Pit, belonging to the Carron Company. He was engaged "holeing," when a part of the roof gave way, falling upon and injuring him severely on the back and left side. We believe the unfortunate man, who is married, and has a small family, is progressing favourably.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 12th December 1861

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Thursday, December 5th

FIXTURE, "KINNEIL." –

Few honoured this meet with their presence, but those who came not may regret it. Thanks to Mr. Wilson of "The Dean" for the welcome he gave us, and for the fine fox he had so carefully kept for us (having never fired a shot in the big wood.) No sooner were the hounds thrown in than they told us all was right. "A quick find," said some; but a quicker get away than was ever seen from this covert put a stop to farther "parley." Away went the pack at a fearful pace for "Tod's Mill," and, nothing daunted by the water, crossed the Avon, and on to Haining Wood; rattling through this, the pack swam the canal, and on through Park Hall grounds to Polmont Station. Here a trifling check took place (time without check, thirty-five minutes.) Hit him off again, when Reynard took a southerly direction, skirting Maddiston, right on to Muiravonside, crossing the Avon at Woodcockdale Cottage; run through Bellesyde Woods to William Crags, over Cockleroy, to Hillhouse quarries: turning then eastwards, he made for Bee Craigs, meaning Champfleurie if possible; but the noble pack forced him out of his reckonings, and obliged him to retreat on Linlithgow. Getting no shelter, even in the Poorhouse,-he fled to the grounds surrounding Mr. Adie's house, and failing in his leap at a low wall into the garden, he was then and there broken up by the eager and well-deserving pack -time, one hour and forty minutes, with only two very trifling checks.

l am, &c.,

One who was There,

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 12th Dunfermline Saturday Press 14th December 1861

LOCAL INTELLIGENCE.

Alarming Fire –

A Cottar's Home Burned Down. - About ten o'clock on Tuesday evening, Craigmill Cottage, near Avonbridge, tenanted by James Carlaw, was observed by some of the neighbours to be on fire. The occupants, consisting of Carlaw, his wife, family, an aged relative, and a lodger who tenanted an attic room, had retired to rest at the usual hour, and were not aware of the circumstance until they were awakened up and apprised of the danger by those who observed the roof on fire The occupants escaped with difficulty, the lodger having effected an egress by the attic window. Every article of food and clothing of the poor but honest cottagers have been destroyed, so that at this inclement season they must be sadly put about, and the sooner a subscription by the right-thinking neighbours is set on foot the better, to compensate the sufferers for the damage they have sustained.

 

 

Falkirk Herald 26th December 1861

Deaths.

At Maddiston, on the 24th inst., William Baird, grocer.

 

1862

Stirling Observer Thursday 23rd 30th January 1862

MUIRAVONSIDE GRASS PARKS

On SATURDAY, 1st FEBRUARY.

To be Let, by Public Roup, on SATURDAY the 1st February, 1862, THE GRASS PARKS on the Estate of Muiravonside, comprising ELEVEN ENCLOSURES, to be Let for Sheep, Cattle, and Horses, as formerly. Likewise, immediately after the Roup of the Grass Parks, there will be sold at Muiravonside Offices,

FIVE FAT SHETLAND STOTS, of the First Quality.

Roup to begin with the Parks at Drumbowie, at One o'Clock, and to finish with the Parks at Seatrees, &c. JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Dundee Courier 22nd February 1862

MARRIAGES

At Holybush Cottage, Maddiston, on the 18th inst., by the Rev. Mr. McFarlane. Mr. John Baillie (late of Bathgate), clerk, Almond Ironworks, to Miss Baird, daughter of the late Mr. William Baird, builder, Maddiston.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 3rd April 1862

DUNCAN. - Suddenly, at Whiterigg, Mr. Thomas Duncan, Lochhead, Muiravonside, aged 64 years, factor to the late Miss Wilson, Greenknowes.

 

Dundee Courier Monday 7th April 1862

GENERAL NEWS.

Mr. Thomas Duncan, factor to the late Miss Wilson, Greenknowes, near Muiravonside, was binning some hay on a cart at Whiterigg, on Monday, when the rope broke, and he was thrown to the ground. He fractured his skull, and died in about an hour.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 1st May 1862

LIST OF NEW APPLICATIONS LICENSE CERTIFICATES, presented for hearing at the JUSTICE OF PEACE LICENSING COURT for STIRLINGSHIRE, to be held at Stirling, on TUESDAY, 6th May, 1862.

The applications marked a are for Premises at present Unlicensed.

Those marked b are for Premises already in possession of Applicant, under transfer of former Tenant's Certificate.

Those marked c are for an Alteration in the character of an existing License, from Grocers to Publicans, or Innkeepers, as the case may be, or for the addition of the Spirit License to that for Ale, &c. already held by Applicant; and the remainder are the Applications of New Tenants, entering upon Licensed Premises.

The Certificates applied for are, except where otherwise expressed, for Spirits, Porter, &c.

PARISH OF MUIRAVONSIDE

b Mrs. Ann Fisher or Stewart,

Widow of the late Robert Stewart or McCulloch, Publican, Linlithgow Bridge, - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Public House, Linlithgow Bridge.

FAT CATTLE AT GOWANBANK, ON TUESDAY. 6th MAY.

 TO be Sold by Public Roup, on TUESDAY the 6th May, 1862, at the Feeding Byres at GOWAN BANK near Avonbridge, belonging to James Gowan, Esquire, 11 FAT CROSS SHORT-HORN STOTS, of First Quality. Roup to begin at Two o'Clock precisely.

 JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 15th May 1862

LICENCE APPEAL COURT.-

An adjourned Court of the Justices of the Peace for the county was held in the Town-House, when the following Justices were present, viz William Leckie Ewing, Esq. of Arngomery, who presided; John Millar, Esq. of Millfield; Alex. Macfarlane, Esq.; Colonel Dundas of Carronhall; Robert Curror, Esq.; Thomas M'Micking, Esq.; and William Wright, Esq. of Broom.

Licences were granted for two hotels at Falkirk and one at Larbert; for one public house at Airth; eight at Falkirk, one at Muiravonside, and one at Polmont; one grocer's licence at Larbert, and two at Polmont. Two certificates were refused - one at Larbert the other at Polmont. A case continued from last week, for a licence at Bridge of Allan, was granted.

 

Stirling Observer - Thursday 22nd , 29th, May, 18th, 25th September 1862

LANDS IN THE PARISH OF MUIRAVONSIDE, TO SELL.

To be Sold, by Public Roup, within the Crown Inn, Falkirk, on THURSDAY, the 23d day of April next, at One o'Clock Afternoon,

ALL and WHOLE the LANDS locally known as STANDBURN, being part of the Lands of Farrenridge, as they sometime belonged to Mr. Nimmo, extending to Eight Acres, Nine Poles, conform to Measurement; with the HOUSES thereon. Valuable Coal exists in the Lands, and is wrought in adjacent Property-

Apply to Adam Smith, Writer, Falkirk.

Falkirk, 26th March, 1863.

 

London Standard, Morning Post, Saturday 28 June, Dundee Courier Tuesday 1st July,

Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette Thursday 3rd July, Stirling Observer Thursday 10 July 1862

DEATHS

STIRLING.— On the 36th inst., at 18, Curzon-Sreet, Mayfair,  London, Charlotte Dorothea, wife of Charles Stirling Muiravonside, Stirlingshire, and only daughter of the late Vice Admiral Charles Stirling (?)of Woburn Farm Surrey.

 

Caledonian Mercury 16th Wednesday; Stirling Observer Thursday 17th July 1862

LINLITHGOW HORTICUCLTURAL SOCIETY.-

The summer exhibition of this very flourishing Society was held on Tuesday in the Town Hall, Linlithgow. In the gardener's department there was an admirable display both of flowers and vegetables, the quality being excellent, although the varieties were not numerous. Mr. John Hardy, banker, exhibited some choice fuchsias in pots, which were much admired; and a number of beautiful plants from the conservatories of Rockvilleand Longcroft, added considerably to the floral display. The only fruits exhibited were strawberries; and one sample from the garden of Admiral Sir James Hope at Carriden, waspaticularly large and ripe. In the amateur'sdepartment, the show of vegetables was exceedingly good; indeed, considering the late ungenial weather, anything like it could scarcely have been anticipated. In the afternoon the exhibition was open to the public, and was numerously patronised. The following gentlemen officiated as judges:- Messrs Mickel, Avonbridge; Kilpatrick, jun. Wallhouse; Juck, Kinniel; and Scott, Millifeld.

 

Glasgow Herald Monday 21st July 1862

ADJOURNED SALE OF VALUABLE COAL FIELD AND GOING COLLIERY IN STIRLINGSHIRE.

UPSET PRICES REDUCED.

THE Extensive COAL FIELD on the Estate of CRAIGEND, In the Parish of Muiravonside, and County of Stirling, with the Whole of the Present WORKING PLAN of the COLLIERY, as formerly advertised will be re-exposed to Sale, by Public Roup, (unless previously disposed of by private bargain.) at Reduced Upset PrIces, within the Rooms of Gay and Black, 65, George Street, Edinburgh, on Wednesday, 11th August, 1862, at Two o'clock.

Partlculars may be had from Mr. Learmouth McKenzie, Craigend House; Messrs Russel & Aitken Writers. Falkirk; or Messrs. Gibson-Cralg, Dalziel & Brodies, W.S., Edinburgh, in whose hands are the title Deeds, Plans, and Articles of Roup.

ADJOURNED SALE OF LANDS IN THE PARISH OF MUIRAVONSIDE, AND COUNTY OF STIRLING.

UPSET PRICES REDUCED.

THE LANDS of GREENWELLS, HIRST, CROY, GLENHEAD, GLENEND, and Part of MANUELRIG, and MOSS CANDLE, and HOUSES in the VILLAGE of RUMFORD, forming the Unentailed Parts of the Estate of Craigend, as formerly advertised will be re-exposed to Sale, by Public Roup, (unless previously disposed of by private bargain,) at Reduced Upset prices, within the Rooms of Gay & Black, 65 George Street, Edinburgh, on Wednesday, 13th August, 1862, at Two o'clock.

Particulars may he had on application to Mr. Learmonth McKenzie, at Craigend House; to Messrs. Russel & Aitken, Writers. Falkirk; or to Messrs. Gibson-Craig, Dalziel & Brodies W ,S, Edinburgh, in whose hands are the Deeds Plans, and Articles of Roup.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 24th July 1862

MARRIAGES

HUNTER - MARSHALL.

At Avonbridge, on the 14th inst., by the Rev. Mr. Horn, Thomas Hunter, Esq., Alloa, to Janet fifth daughter of the late Robert Marshall, Esq., of Avonbridge.

 

Glasgow Herald Monday 4th August 1862

ADJOURNED SALE OF CRAIGEND BRICK AND TILE WORK.

UPSET PRICE REDUCED.

This Work, situated In the Parish of Muiravonside and County of Stirling, with upwards of 12 Acres of LAND, Containing FIRE and COMMON CLAY of first quality, and with TENANT'S DWELLING HOUSE, DWELLING HOUSES for, WORKMEN. STABLE. &c., and all the MACHINERY requisite for Grinding and Manufacturing Fire and Common Clay, Will be re-exposed to Sale, by Public Roup, (unless previously disposed of by private bargain) at a Reduced Upset Price, within Cay& Black's Rooms, No. 65 George Street Edinburgh, on Wednesday,13th August 1862, at Two o'clock.

Particulars may be had from Mr. Learmonth McKenzie, Craigend House; Messrs Russel & Aitken Writers. Falkirk; or Messrs. Gibson-Craig, Dalziel & Brodies. W.S. Edinburgh, In whose hands are the Title Deeds and Articles of Roup.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 7th August 1862

BIRTHS

BLACK. - At Hillend, Avonbridge, on the 27th ult., the wife of James Black, Esq., of a daughter.

 

Dunfermline Saturday Press Saturday 9th August 1862

NEW ROUTE FROM BATHGATE TO GLASGOW. –

We understand that the new line of railway, from Bathgate to Airdrie, and thence direct to Glasgow, will be opened for passenger traffic in a day or two. The Government inspector passed over the line towards the end of June, and recommended some alterations at different points. These have now been improved upon and completed, and the line will therefore be formally opened almost immediately. The line, we believe, from Bathgate to Cowdenhead, was formed several years ago, but was only employed for mineral traffic. The railway is now extended from Cowdenhead, to Airdrie and Coatbridge, thus joining the other lines at present in operation to the western metropolis. This new route will be a great boon to the inhabitants of Bathgate. The former line via Avonbridge and Slamannan resembled much the old coach system of travelling. One passage only could be effected each day from Bathgate to Glasgow. We hail with much satisfaction the completion of the works of this portion of the Monkland Railways Company.-

Glasgow Herald

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 14th August 1862

COUNTY OF STIRLING. REGISTRATION OF VOTERS' COURTS. INTIMATION IS HEREBY MADE, That the SHERIFF of the COUNTY of STIRLING has given Notice, in terms of the Acts 2d and 3d William IV. chap. 65, and 24th and 25th Victoria, chap. 83, that on the days, and at the places after specified, he will hold open Courts, for the purpose of Revising and Correcting the Register of Voters for the County of Stirling, and deciding on the merits of all Claims for Registration within the same, Objections to these Claims, and Objections to Persons continuing on the Roll of Voters, viz.:-

At FALKIRK –

And within the Sheriff Court- House there, on the 8th day of September next, at 12 o' Clock Noon, for the Parishes of FALKIRK - So far as not comprehended in the Burgh of Falkirk.

AIRTH, LARBERT, BOTHKENNAR, POLMONT, MUIRAVONSIDE, and SLAMANAN.

THOMAS L. GALBRAITH,

Sheriff-Clerk.

Sheriff-Clerk's Office, Stirling, 7th August, 1862.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 28th August, 4th September 1862

COUNTY OF STIRLING.

Valuation of lands and heritages, . Statute 17 and 18 Vie, Cap. 91.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That the Commissioners of Supply of the County of Stirling will hold a Court, upon the days and at the places undermentioned, for the purpose of hearing Appeals against the Valuations made by the Assessor for the current year, under the above mentioned Statute, viz : -

At Falkirk, upon WEDNESDAY the 10th of September, within the Court-House there, at 12 o'Clock Noon, for appeals from the parishes of AIRTH, MUIRAVONSIDE, BOTHKENNAR, POLMONT, FALKIRK, SLAMANNAN.

Notice is farther given, that to entitle parties to be heard on Appeal, notice in writing must be given to the Assessor at least six days prior to the foresaid 9th and 19th days of September, that the Appellant intends to maintain his Appeal; and the amount of valuation he alleges should be substituted for the amount assessed by the Assessor, must be specified in said notice .

By Order of the Convener.

ROB. CAMPBELL, Clerk of Supply.

Stirling, 27th August, 1862.

 

Glasgow Herald Monday 15th September 1862

ADJOURNED SALE OF VALUABLE COAL FIELD AND GOING COLLIERY IN STIRLINGSHIRE.

UPSET PRICES FURTHER REDUCED.

THE Extensive COAL FIELD on the Estate of CRAIGEND, In the Parish of Muiravonside, and County of Stirling, with the Whole of the Present WORKING PLAN of the COLLIERY, as formerly advertised will be re-exposed to Sale, by Public Roup, (unless previously disposed of by private bargain.) at Reduced Upset PrIces, within the Rooms of Gay and Black, 65, George Street, Edinburgh, on Wednesday, 11th August, 1862, at Two o'clock.

Partlculars may be had from Mr. Learmouth McKenzie, Craigend House; Messrs Russel & Aitken Writers. Falkirk; or Messrs. Gibson-Cralg, Dalziel & Brodies, W.S., Edinburgh, in whose hands are the title Deeds, Plans, and Articles of Roup.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 25th 29th September 1862

THE ADJOURNED SALE OF LANDS IN THE PARISH OF MUIRAVONSIDE, AND COUNTY OF STIRLING.

UPSET PRICES FURTHER REDUCED.

THE LANDS of GREENWELLS, HIRST, CROY, GLENHEAD, GLENEND, and Part of MANUELRIG, and MOSS CANDLE, and HOUSES in the VILLAGE of RUMFORD,

As formerly advertised, on Wednesday, 22d October, 1862, at Two o'clock, at greatly reduced Upset Prices

Particulars may he had on application to Mr. Learmonth McKenzie, at Craigend House; to Messrs. Russel & Aitken, Writers. Falkirk; or to Messrs. Gibson-Craig, Dalziel & Brodies W ,S, Edinburgh, in whose hands are the Deeds Plans, and Articles of Roup.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 2nd 9th October 1862

DESIRABLE RESIDENCE in STIRLINGSHIRE,

FOR SALE.

There will be exposed to Sale, by Public Roup, within the Faculty Hall, Saint George's Place, Glasgow, on WEDNESDAY the 22d day of October, 1862, (unless previously disposed of by Private Bargain,) THE ESTATE of LAURENCE PARK, in the Parishes of Polmont and Muiravonside, and County of Stirling, consisting of about 286 Imperial Acres, situated on the High Road from Edinburgh to Falkirk, about 4 miles from the latter. The Mansion House is a large and commodious modern building, containing Dining Room, Drawing Room, with Conservatory entering from it, Parlour or Library, and Six Bed Rooms, two of which have Dressing Rooms attached, with Kitchen, Attics and ample accommodation for Servants. There is Water in the House and all modern conveniences. It is advantageously situated between the Polmont and Linlithgow Stations of the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway, about 2 1/2 miles from each. The Pleasure Grounds are extensive and tastefully laid out. There is a good walled Garden, with Forcing House, Vinery, and Melon Pit, and a large Kitchen Garden. About 35 Acres are under Plantation. There are two Lodges, and the Stable accommodation is ample. Of the Agricultural portion of the Estate about 110 Acres (Scotch), are Let on a Lease which expires at Martinmas, 1868. The remainder is in the occupation of the Proprietor. The Public Burdens amount to about £21 per annum. A considerable portion of the Price will be allowed to remain on the security of the Property.

For further particulars, application may be made to M'Grigor, Stevenson &  Fleming, Writers, Glasgow, in whose hands are the Title Deeds and Articles of Roup.

Glasgow, 25th September, 1862.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 16th October 1862

LIST of APPLICATIONS for CERTIFICATES for the SALE OF EXCISEABLE LIQUORS for the COUNTY OF STIRLING, for New Premises, by New Tenants or Occupants, and for Renewal of Transferred Certificates: Name, Designation, and Residence of Applicant -       

John Heaps, Miner and Grocer, Mosscandle Cottage, near Blackbraes, Muiravonside.

Place and Parish of County of Premises -

Blackbraes, Parish of Muiravonside

Class of Certificate applied for -

Grocer's License

Name and Address of Landlord or Factor of Premises -

The Applicant, Proprietor.

 

Dundee Advertiser Saturday 25th, Dundee, Perth, and Cupar Advertiser, Tuesday 28 October 1862

The Craigend Brick and Tile Work, Muiravonside, Stirlingshire, was sold on Wednesday, for £2000.

 

Glasgow Herald Friday 7th November 1862

ADJOURNED SALE OF THE CHOICE AND DESIRABLE ESTATE OF GREENKOWE, I

N THE COUNTY OF STIRLING.

To be held, by Public Roup, within the Red Lion Hotel., Falkirk, on Thursday the 27th November, 1862, at Two o'clock Afternoon,

THE BAUTIFUL SMALL ESTATE OF GREENKNOWE which belonged to the late Miss Katherine Wilson,  situated in the Parish of Muiravonside and County of Stirling about Three Miles from Linlithgow, Five from Falkirk, and Two-and-a-Half from Polmont Station on the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway, and about three-quarters of a mile from Causewayend Station on the Monklands Railway. The Property is bounded on the west and south by the Public Roads leading to Falkirk and Linlithgow, and extends to 151 Acres, or thereby, of true bearing alluvial soil, including 16 Acres of Plantations. The Mansion House is delightfully situated on the south side of the Property, and consists of Dining Room, Drawing Room, Library, five Bed Rooms, Kitchen, Scullery, Butler's pantry, Laundry, and Servants' Apartments; with Stables, Coach House, and Offices attached.

The Farm of Gillandersland on the Estate, Possessed by Mr. Wm. Cuthill, an enterprising Tenant, has been mostly Drained, and is capable of bearing all kinds of Cereal Crops; and there is also an Excellent Farm Steading, with every necessary accommodation for Carrying on the Farm.

The gross Yearly Rental of the Property, including Mansion House, &c, is £288.

The Public burdens are moderate.

UPSET PRICE, £6000.

For further particulars, apply to Mr. John Gair, Writer, Falkirk, in whose hands may be seen the Title Deeds, Articles of Roup, and Plan of the Estate.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer,

Falkirk, 29th October, 1862.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 13th November 1862

MILCH COWS, HAY, MANURE, HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE, &c. AT REDFORD,

 On MONDAY the 17th NOVEMBER.

TO be Sold by Public Roup, by a Warrant from the Sheriff, on MONDAY the 17th November, 1862, on the Premises at Redford, Muiravonside, possessed by Mr. Henry Main, who has gone abroad -viz.: -

7 Excellent Ayrshire Milch Cows,

2 Pigs,

4 Ricks of Ryegrass Hay,

A Quantity of Byre Manure.

 Also, HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE, Consisting, of Eight-day Clock, Kitchen Dresser, Tables, Chairs, Dairy Utensils, &c.

Ready Cash.

Roup to begin at Twelve o'clock.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Stirling Observer 13th November 1862

WEATHER AND CROPS.-

To all appearances sterile winter has commenced his reign in this locality, a considerable quantity of snow having fallen for the last two days, which lies at present about four inches deep. This is somewhat to be deplored, on account of its earliness, and the lateness of certain of the cereal crops still to be cut down and secured in the barn-yard. We understand that there is still to be cut down a field of oats, of nine acres extent, in the neighbourhood of Causewayend Furnaces; besides other fields of grain farther to the west, near Maddiston and Slamannan.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 4th   December 1862

COUNTY VOTERS.

 The list of voters has now been published, and a glance at the undernoted statistics will show the good effects already accomplished by the Act passed last session to amend the law regarding the registration of County Voters in Scotland. Not less than 797 votes have been expunged from the roll, as representing voters either dead or disqualified, and 894 new votes entered on register - showing altogether an increase in the County constituency of 97 votes.

Voters on Register of 1861. Dead or Disqualified. Entered on Register 1862. Roll as amended 1862.

Polmont               67                                         27                                         30                                         70

Muiravonside     68                                         28                                         31                                         71

Slamannan          70                                         37                                        51                                        87

 

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 4th 11th, 18th, December 1862

ASSESSED TAXES, 1862-63.

APPEAL COURTS. - COUNTY OF STIRLING.

COMMISSIONERS OF SUPPLY for the Several Districts of the County of Stirling, will meet on the days and at the places undermentioned, to Charge and DETERMINE APPEALS against the Charge made by the Surveyor for the current year: -

For the DISTRICT of FALKIRK - comprehending the Burgh and Parish of Falkirk, and the Parishes of Airth, Bothkennar, Larbert, Muiravonside, Polmont, and Slamannan –

in the Red Lion Hotel, Falkirk, on TUESDAY the 23d December current, at 11.30 a.m.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 1st January 1863

WILSON. –

At Kendie's Hill, Muiravonside, on the 24th ult., Agnes Barrie, wife of Mr. James Wilson, farmer. Friends will please accept of this intimation.

 

Glasgow Herald Friday 30th January; Fife Herald Thursday 5th February 1863

FALKIRK CATTLE FAIR.

The winter fair for cattle and horses was held yesterday I on the usual stance in the Callander Riggs. The stock exhibited was limited in point of numbers, though, all things considered, in fair condition. The various lots, however, as they took up their respective positions, presented a somewhat tardy appearance, owing to the wetness of the day. The attendance of dealers was considerable, but the amount of business done was not great. The market throughout was dull, and at the close a few animals were driven off unsold. Prices were back compared with those obtained at the corresponding market last year. The follow- The following are a few quotations :- Mr. A. Liddle, cattle- dealer, Denly, sold his Ayrshire cows at from £11 to £12. Mr. Graham, Myrthill, Denny, sold his milch cows at from £10, 10s. to £12 a-piece. Mr. Henry Aitken, Avonbridge, exhibited some very fine milch cows, which he sold at prices ranging from £11 to £14. He sold some grass beasts at £6 each. A good many horses were shown, but few sales were effected.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 12th 19th 26th February, 5th March 1863

MUIRAVONSIDE GRASS PARKS, On SATURDAY, 28th FEBRUARY. To be Let, by Public Roup, on SATURDAY, the 28th February, 1863, THE GRASS PARKS on the Estate of Muiravonside, comprising ELEVEN ENCLOSURES; to be Let for Sheep, Cattle, and Horses, as formerly.

Roup to begin with the Parks at Drumbowie at One o'Clock Afternoon, and to finish with the Parks at Seatrees, &c.

JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 26th February 1863

SUMMARY COURT CASES. –

On Monday, John Robertson, baker, Avonbridge, was brought up before Sheriff Sconce for riot and assault, and was fined 10s. or 10 days' imprisonment.

 

Elgin Courier Friday 27th February 1863

AVONBRIDGE - COLLISION ON THE MONKLANDS RAILWAY. –

On Thursday morning about ten o'clock two goods trains came into serious collision at or near Avonbridge. We understand that several trucks were smashed, and that considerable damage was done to both engines. The men in charge of the engines were unhurt.

 

Glasgow Herald Friday 13th February 1863

DESIRABLE REISIDENCE IN STRLINGSHIRE FOR SALE.

UPSET PRICE REDUCED.

For Sale, by Public Roup, within the Faculty Hall, St. George's Place, Glasgow, on Wednesday the 25th day of February, 1803, at Two o'clock Afternoon, (unless previously disposed of by private bargain THE ESTATE of LAURENCE PARK, in the Parishes of Polmont and Muiravonside and County of Stirling, consisting of about 286 Imperial Acres, situated on the High Road from Edinburgh to Falkirk, about 4 ½   miles from the latter. The Mansion House is a large and commodious modern building, containing Dining Room, Drawing room, with Conservatory entering from it, Parlour or Library, and Six Bed Rooms, two of which have Dressing- Rooms attached, with Kitchen, Attics, and ample accommodation for Servants. There is Water in the House and all modern conveniences. It is advantageously situated between the Polmont and Linlithgow Stations of the Edinburgh and Glasgow, Railway, about -2 ½  miles from each. The Pleasure Grounds are extensive and tastefully laid out. There is a good walled Garden, with Forcing- House, Vinery, and Melon Pit, and a large Kitchen Garden. About 35 Acres are under Plantation. There are two Lodges, and the Stable accommodation is ample. Of the Agricultural portion of the Estate about 110 Acres (Scotch), are Let on a Lease which expires at Martinmas, 1868. The remainder is in the occupation of the Proprietor. The Public Burdens amount to about £21 per annum. A considerable portion of the Price will be allowed to remain on the security of the Property.

For further particulars, application may be made to M'Grigor, Stevenson & Fleming, Writers, Glasgow, in whose hands are the Title Deeds and Articles of Roup.

PETER BURN &, CO., Auctioneers.

Glasgow, 10th January, 1863.

 

Stirling Observer - Thursday 2nd, 16th, April 1863

LANDS IN THE PARISH OF MUIRAVONSIDE, TO SELL.

To be Sold, by Public Roup, within the Crown Inn, Falkirk, on THURSDAY, the 23d day of April next, at One o'Clock Afternoon, ALL and WHOLE the LANDS locally known as STANDBURN, being part of the Lands of Farrenridge, as they sometime belonged to Mr. Nimmo, extending to Eight Acres, Nine Poles, conform to Measurement; with the HOUSES thereon. Valuable Coal exists in the Lands, and is wrought in adjacent Property-

Apply to Adam Smith, Writer, Falkirk.

Falkirk, 26th March, 1863.

 

 

Stirling Observer 9th April 1863

LIST OF APPLICATIONS for CERTIFICATES for the SALE OF EXCISABLE LIQUORS for the COUNTY of STIRLING, for NEW PREMISES, by NEW TENANTS or OCCUPANTS, and for RENEWAL of TRANSFERRED

CERTIFICATES

 

Name and  Designation     Place and Parish of County, Class of Certificates applied for. Name and Address of

and Residence of Applicant    Place. | Parish                                                                           Landlord or Factor of Premises.                                                                           

FOR NEW PREMISES

Alexander Cunningham, Grocer,     Maddiston,     Muiravonside,            Dealer in Groceries                         Applicant

Maddiston, Muiravonside,                                                                                and Provisions                                 Proprietor

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 7th  May 1863

CIRCUIT COURT.

The Spring Circuit Court for the Stirling district was opened here on Tuesday - Lords Jerviswoode and Neaves presiding. The Judges marched in procession from the Royal Hotel to the Court House, accompanied by the usual military escort. The Rev. William Wilson inaugurated the proceedings with an appropriate prayer; and the Court thereafter proceeded to enpannel the Jury. Mr. Thoms acted as advocate depute, assisted by Mr. Hamilton, and Mr. Hamilton Bell as clerk. The counsel present were Messrs A. B. Shand, M'Kie, Couper, Lamond, Orphort, Balfour, Cattanach, and M'Laren. Among those present in Court we observed Sheriffs Moir, Tait, Robertson, Sconce, Provost Murrie, and the Magistrates.

THEFT.

Margaret Dick and Mary Ann Godfrey were charged with theft, aggravated by previous conviction, in so far as, on the 20th Dec, 1862, they stole eight and a half feet of lead or metal pipe, at or near the mansion house of Candie, in the parish of Muiravonside. Both panels pled guilty, and Margaret Dick was sentenced to 4 years' penal servitude and Mary Ann Godfrey to 9 months' imprisonment.

 

Glasgow Herald Wednesday 17th June 1863

SCOTCH BANKRUTPTS.

(From the Edinburgh Gazette of Yesterday.)

APPLICATIONS FOR CESSIO BONORUM.

Thomas Malcolm, sometime farmer, and residing at Broadhead, in the parish of Muiravonside, thereafter residing at Ballenbreich, in said parish, and presently a prisoner in the Prison of Stirling.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday June 18th 1863

FAIRS.

LINLITHGOW CATTLE FAIR.

Friday, June 12. The Linlithgow June Fair for cattle and horses was held to-day on the usual stance at the extreme west end of the burgh. The weather, though somewhat dull, was highly favourable to the exhibition of stock. The number of cattle on the ground was very much less than last year, and compared with the stock shown some ten years ago it sinks about one-half. It would be difficult to say the cause of this periodical falling off, but no doubt it is partly and indeed to a great extent attributable to the facilities now afforded by railway for the transit of cattle to other and more important markets. And in respect to the proceedings of to-day the fact of Renfrew Fair falling to be held on the same day told considerably against Linlithgow, because some dealers prefer taking their stock to the former market when such a coincidence as that mentioned occurs. The stock upon the ground to-day consisted chiefly of Ayrshire cows and grazing cattle, with several large lots of Irish calves and bullocks. The demand for good Milch cows was fair, and prices were considered to be about an average with those obtained at Rutherglen this week. Good grass beasts were specially picked up at remunerative prices, and it seemed to be the general impression that compared with the rates current at recent markets for this kind of stock, those realised to-day were if anything a shade better. The Irish grazers - as they have been at the bulk of the fairs on this district - were quite a drug, very few sales being effected, and these unimportant. Milch cows were selling at from £8 to £10 10s., and from £11 to £15, and calves at from £8 to £13. Grass beasts sold at from £7 10s. downwards. The following are a few sales:- Mr Andrew Liddell, cattle-dealer, Denny, showed a lot of good milch cows, a few of which he sold at prices ranging from £10 to £13 10s. Mr. Aitken Foggermountain, sold his grass boasts at from £6 10s. to £7 10s., and calving cows at from £12 to £13. Mr. Nimmo, Bathgate, sold several Milch cows at from £9 to £15. Mr. Graham, Myothill, Denny, showed about fifty head of cattle, consisting of Milch cows and grass beasts. He sold an excellent milch cow to Mr. John Martin, Edinburgh, at £14 10s., and a lot of grazers to Mr. Johnstone, banker, Bathgate, at a remunerative figure. Mr. William Gentleman, Avonbridge, sold a lot of grass beasts at £5 a-head, and a lot of calving cows at from £8 to £10. Mr. Charles Owens, from county Tyrone, Ireland, sold two small lots of Irish bullocks at from £7 to £8 a-piece. As a whole the market was considered a fair one for sellers. In the horse market little was done, and no sales worth particularising were effected.

 

Caledonian Mercury Monday 29th June; Stirling Observer Thursday 2nd July 1863

RONALD-PENDER-At Linlithgowbridge, on the 26th inst., by the Rev. Mr. Scrymgeour, Mr. Robert Ronald, Avonbridge, to Elizabeth, eldest daughter of the late Mr. Pender, corn dealer, Linlithgowbridge.

 

 

Dunfermline Press Wednesday 19th; Stirling Observer Thursday 20th August 1863

MAILER - MARSHALL.- At Avonbridge, on the 11th inst., by the Rev. Robert S. Home, Slamannan, Mr. John Mailer, builder, Alloa, to Margaret, daughter of the late Robert Marshall,. Esq., Bridgend, Slamannan.

 

Caledonian Mercury Wednesday 2nd September 1863

SCOTCH BANKRUPTS.

SEQUESTRATIONS.

Robert Geekie Dunn & Company, lately tenants of Glenrig Tile Works, near Falkirk, and now farmers at Collonshields and Gateside Farms, in the parish of Muiravonside and county of Stirling - creditors meet in the Golden Lion Hotel, King Street, Stirling, 10th September, twelve o'clock-

Jas. Peddie, writer, Stirling, agent.

 

Fife Herald, Dundee Courier, Thursday 3rd Perry’s Bankrupt Gazette Saturday 5th September 1863

SCOTCH BANKRUPTS.

SEQUESTRATIONS.

Robert Geekie Dunn & Company, lately tenants of Glenrig Tile Works, near Falkirk, and now farmers at Collonshields and Gateside Farms, in the parish of Muiravonside and county of Stirling, and Robert Geekie Dunn, farmer at Collonshields aforesaid, and Alexander Dunn, lately tenant of Teemvaily Tile Works, county of Durham, and now farmer at Gateside aforesaid, the only individual partners of said company, as partners thereof, and as individuals.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 3rd September 1863

COUNTY OF STIRLING.

VALUATION OF.LANDS AND HERITAGES, Statute 17 and 18 Vie, Cap, 91.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That the Commissioners of Supply of the County of Stirling Will hold a COURT, upon the days and at the places under-mentioned, for the purpose of hearing APPEALS against the Valuations made by the Assessor for the current year under the above-mentioned Statute, Viz.: -

At FALKIRK, upon TUESDAY the 15th day of September, within the Court-House there, at Half-past Twelve o'Clock, for Appeals from the Parishes of

 MUIRAVONSIDE,

POLMONT.

SLAMANNAN.

 

Glasgow Herald Saturday 5th September 1863

FARM TO LET,

With Entry to the Lands and Buildings at Martinmas.

THE FARM of GILLANDERSLAND, in the Parish of Muiravonside and County of Stirling, consisting of l60 Imperial Acres, or thereby, the whole of which is Arable. The Farm is within half a mile of Causewayend Station of the Slamannan Railway, two miles and a half from the Polmont Station on of the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway, and three miles from Linlithgow. By the Union Canal, Manure, &c., can be laid down within a mile of the Farm. The Boundaries will be pointed out by James Ryrie, Tarduf House; and Offers will be received and other information given by William Stirling, 179 West George Street, Glasgow.

 

Hampshire Advertiser Saturday 5th September 1863

SCOTCH BANKRUPTS.

R. G. Dunn and Co., Muiravonside, Stirling, farmers


Stirling Observer Thursday 17th September 1863

BURGH POLICE COURT. –

Thomas Turnbull, labourer, Avonbridge, for a breach of the peace, was ordered to pay a fine of 5s. or go to prison for five days.

 

Dundee Advertiser Monday 28th September 1863

FALKIRK.

 Fatal Accident.—On Thursday night,a carter, named John Shaw, residing Avonbridge, fell off his cart, and rolling in before one the wheels, it passed over and injured him fatally. Deceased was married, and has left a wife and family.

 

Stirling Observer 8th October 1863

BURGH POLICE COURT - At this Court on Monday –

Bailie RUSSELL on the bench

on MONDAY, Alex. M'Pherson, and James Ure, aged respectively ten and seven years, sons of miners residing at Maddiston, were brought up before Sheriff Sconce for shifting the points on the Blackbraes and Causewayend Railway, and also for placing two pieces of wood and a stone upon the rails at the same place, with the apparent intention of throwing a train off the line. Fortunately, however, both malicious acts were observed in time to prevent any accident. The boys, on account of their youth, were dismissed from the bar.

A DEAR TURNIP. -  On Wednesday, Wm. Dailly, drawer, Blackbraes, for stealing a turnip from Craigend farm, was fined 2s. 6d.

 

Dunfermline Saturday Press Saturday 24th,Caledonian Mercury Monday 26th,Stirling Observer Thursday 29th  October 1863

MARRIAGES

STIRLING - GROTE. - At Trieste, on the 14th inst., by the Rev. Samuel Tucker, H.M. Consular Chaplain, Commander Charles Stirling, R.N., second son of Charles Stirling, Esq., of Muiravonside, Stirlingshire, to Selina Matilda, daughter of Arthur Grote, Esq., Bengal Civil Service.


Dunfermline Saturday Press, Saturday 14th 21th 28th, Caledonian Mercury, Saturday 14th November, Glasgow Herald Saturday 28th November 1863

GLASGOW AND NORTH BRITISH RAILWAY.

(Incorporation of Company to Make and Maintain a Railway from Glasgow to Edinburgh, with Branches connecting it with the Glasgow and Paisley Joint Railway, the Monkland Railways, the Charleston Railway, and the South Queensferry Branch Railway - Branch to Grangemouth Docks and other Works and Connections - Powers to and Working and other Arrangements and Agreements with the North British Railway Company - Amendment of Acts, and other purposes.)

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That it is intended to apply to Parliament next Session for leave to bring in a Bill to incorporate a Company (hereinafter called "The Company") for making, using, and maintaining the following Railways and Works, or some of them, with all necessary conveniences connected therewith that is to say, - 1. A Railway commencing at a point in the City of Glasgow, and county of Lanark, in or near Blackfriars Street of the said City, 150 yards or thereabouts eastward of the Junction of Blackfriars Street with High Street, and terminating by a Junction with the authorised line of the North British (Edinburgh, Dunfermline, and Perth No. 1 Railway) at its Western terminus - viz., at a point 210 yards or thereabouts north-eastward of the Bridge carrying the North British, late Edinburgh, Perth, and Dundee Railway, under the Turnpike Road leading from Leith to Queensferrv, called the Queensferry Road, in the Parish of St Cuthbert's and County of Edinburgh, and which said intended Railway will pass from, in, through, or into the several Parishes, Royal Burghs, and other places following, or some of them, "that is to say : -Glasgow, St James' of Glasgow, Blackfriars' or College of Glasgow, St John's of Glasgow, St Thomas' of Glasgow, Barony of Glasgow, Camlachie, Shettleston, Old Monkland, New Monkland, and the Royal Burgh of Glasgow, in the County of Lanark ; Cumbernauld, in the County of Dumbarton; Slamannan, Falkirk, Polmont, and Muiravonside, in the County of Stirling ; Linlithgow, Borrowstouness, Carriden, Abercorn, Dalmeny, Cramond, Kirkliston, and the Royal Burgh of Linlithgow, in the County of Linlithgow; Kirkliston, Corstorphine, Cramond, North Leith, St Cuthbert's, the Royal Burgh of Edinburgh, and the Burgh or Town of Leith, in the County of Edinburgh, and In the County of the City of Edinburgh. 2. A Railway commencing by a Junction with the line of the Glasgow and Paisley Joint Railway, at or near a point 35 yards, or thereby, south-westward of the Bridge carrying the said Joint Railway over Cook's Street, Tradeston of Glasgow, in the Parish of Govan and County of Lanark, and terminating by a junction with Railway No. 1, at or near the foresaid Terminus thereof, in Blackfriars' Street of the City of Glasgow aforesaid ; and which said intended Railway will pass from, in, through, or into the several Parishes, Royal Burgh, and other places following, or some of them, that is to say: - Govan, Laurieston, Gorbals, Glasgow, St Enoch's of Glasgow, Tron or St. Mary's or Laigh Kirk of Glasgow, St Andrew's of Glasgow, St James' of Glasgow, Blackfriars' or College of Glasgow, St John's of Glasgow, and the Royal Burgh of Glasgow, all in the County of Lanark. 3. A Railway commencing by a Junction with Railway No. 1 at a point in the parish of Old Monkland and County of Lanark, 140 yards or thereabouts westward of the Gartsherrie Station of the Caledonian Railway, and terminating by a Junction with the Monklands Railway at a point 240 yards or thereabouts southward of the farm buildings of Hollandhirst, in the said parish of Old Monkland and County of Lanark, and which Railway will be situate in the last named Parish and County. 4. A Railway commencing by a Junction with the Railway No. 1 at a point in the parish of Muiravonside and County of Stirling, 200 yards or thereabouts southward of the Bridge carrying the Monkland Railways Company's Slamannan and Borrowstouness Railway over the Union Canal, and terminating by a Junction with the said Slamannan and Borrowstouness Railway at a point in the parish of Muiravonside and County of Stirling sixty yards or thereabouts south-westward of Muiravonside Cottage, all in the said Parish of Muiravonside and County of Stirling. 5. A Railway commencing by a Junction with Railway No. 1, at a point in the Parish of Abercorn and County of Linlithgow, 300 yards or thereabouts, measuring in a northeasterly direction from the Farm Steading of Mannerston, and terminating by a Junction with the Charleston Branch of the North British Railway Company, at a point in the Parish of Dunfermline and County of Fife, 420 yards or thereabouts, measuring in an easterly direction from the Bridge on the Road between Crossford and Limekilns, called the "Coal Bridge," and which said intended railway will pass from, in, through, or into the Parishes and extra parochial, and other places following, or some, or one of them, that is to say, - Abercorn, Carriden, Borrowstouness, and the bed and soil of the Firth of Forth, in or near to the Parish of Carriden, in tbe County of Linlithgow, and Inverkeithing, Torryburn, and Dunfermline, and the bed and soil of the Firth of Forth, in or near to the parish of Torrybarn, in the County of Fife, and the bed and soil of the Firth of Forth, situated between the said parishes of Carriden and Torryburn. C. A Railway commencing by a Junction with Railway No. 5, at a point in the Parish of Carriden and County of Linlithgow, 490 yards or thereabouts westward of the Farm Steading of Burnshot, and terminating by a Junction with Railway No. 1, at a point in the said Parish of Carriden and County of Linlithgow, 220 yards or thereabout eastward of the Farm Steading of Champany, and which said intended Railway will be situate in the Parishes of Carriden and Abercorn, and County of Linlithgow, or one of them. 7. A Railway commencing by a Junction with Railway No. 5 at or near the point of commencement of Railway No. 6, in the Parish of Carriden and County of Linlithgow, and terminating at a point in the Parish of Bothkennar, and County of Stirling, at or upon the South Quay or Wharf of the Grangemouth Docks, measuring 310 yards or thereabouts north-eastward of the existing Grangemouth Railway Station, and which said intended Railway will be situate within the parishes of Carriden, Borrowstouness, Polmont, Falkirk, and Bothkennar, or some or one of them, in the Counties of Linlithgow and Stirling, or one of them. 8. A Railway commencing by a Junction with Railway No. 1, at a point in the Parish of Dalmeny, and County of Linlithgow, 370 yards or thereabouts measuring in a northeasterly direction from the farm buildings of Wheatlands, and terminating by a Junction with the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway Company's authorised branch to South Queensferry, at a point in the said Parish of Dalmeny, 420 yards or thereabouts measuring in a northerly direction from the point on the road leading between Wester and Easter Carlowrie, where such road is authorised to be crossed by the said branch to South Queensferry, and which said intended Railway will pass from, in, through, or into the Parishes following, or some or one of them; that is to say, - Kirkliston and Dalmeny, all in the County of Linlithgow. And Notice is Hereby also Given, That power will be taken by the said Bill to the Company for the following among other purposes: -To deviate in constructing the said intended Railways and Works from the line or lines and levels delineated on the Plans and Sections to be deposited as aftermentioned, to such extent as will be defined on the said plans and sections, and be provided by the said Bill. To cross, alter, divert, and stop up, and to alter the lines, levels, and inclinations of such highways, turnpike, and other roads, railways, streets, paths, passages, rivers, canals, navigations, brooks, streams, firths or estuaries, sewers, waters, water-courses, gas and water pipes, and other works as may be necessary or expedient, for the purpose of making, maintaining-, and working the said Railways and Works, or any part thereof. To acquire by compulsory purchase, or otherwise, all such lands, houses, and other heritages, and property within the several Parishes, Burghs, Towns, and other places aforesaid, or some of them, as may be necessary for the purposes of the said Railways and Works, and to authorise and empower all owners of land, whether persons or corporations, or others holding under entail or other legal disability to convey, to sell or convey their lands and heritages, or any part thereof necessary for the purposes aforesaid, to the said intended Company, or for such annual feu-duty, ground-annual, or rent-charge, or for such consideration in shares, mortgages, or bonds of the said proposed Company as may be fixed or agreed on as the value of such lands and heritages, and to provide that such feu-duty, ground-annual, or rent-charge shall form a preferable lien and burden on the revenues and property of the said intended Company. To vary or extinguish all existing rights and privileges connected with the lands, houses, and other heritages, so to be acquired, and all other rights and privileges which would in any manner impede or interfere with the construction, maintenance, or use of the said Railways and Works, and to confer other rights and privileges in relation to all the matters aforesaid. To levy tolls, rates, and duties on and for the use of the said intended Railways and Works, and for the conveyance of passengers, goods, and other things thereon, and to confer certain exemptions from payment of such tolls, rates, and duties, and certain other rights and privileges in relation thereto. To empower the North British Railway Company to maintain and manage the said proposed Railways and Works, or some of them, or some parts thereof, and to work the traffic thereon, and provide the necessary plant therefore, and to fix, collect, and apportion the tolls, rates, and charges to be levied in respect of such traffic, and to provide for the appointment of a Joint Committee of the Company; and the North British Railway Company, with all usual and necessary powers for the regulation, management, and control of the said proposed Railways and Works, or some of them, or some parts thereof, and of the traffic thereon, as also to empower the said North British Railway Company, and the Company to enter into agreements with each other in relation to the aforesaid matters, or any of them, or otherwise in relation thereto, and to confirm any agreements between the Company and the North British Railway Company, with reference to any such matters as aforesaid.

 

Dunfermline Press Wednesday 18th Dunfermline Saturday Press 21st November 1863

COURT OF SESSION - FIRST DIVISION.

EXTRAORDINARY AFFILIATION CASE.

 Margaret Robertson, Hillhead, Parish of Muiravonside, v. James Cowie, Airdrie. This was an action of affiliation. The pursuer was thirty-two years of age, and the defender at the time he was said to have been father of the child was thirteen years of age. He was in the house along with the pursuer, as he was learning to be a farmer with her brother, to whom the house belonged, the pursuer being the housekeeper. The pursuer in her evidence said she only allowed the defender to use liberties with her because he said to her if she fell with child he would marry her, and after that she allowed him to do as he pleased. The defender denied that he ever had any criminal intercourse with her. The Sheriff-Substitute of Airdrie found the defender liable to the pursuer as the father of the child. The Sheriff Principal altered that interlocutor, and found that the pursuer had not proved that the defender was the father of her child. He said the pursuer being a woman of thirty two years of age, and the defender only a lad of thirteen, was evidently the seducer and he the seduced; but, apart from the pursuer's own testimony, there was no evidence any weight against the defender. He therefore found that she had failed to establish that he was the father of the child, and assoilzied him from the conclusions of the action.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 3rd 10th December 1863

ASSESSED TAXES, 1863-64. APPEAL COURTS - COUNTY OF STIRLING. THE COMMISSIONERS of SUPPLY for the several Districts of the County of Stirling, will MEET, on the Days and at the Places undermentioned, to hear and determine Appeals against charges made by the Surveyor for the current year :-

For the Burgh and Parish of Falkirk - and for the Parishes of Airth, Bothkennar, Larbert, Muiravonside, Polmont, and Slamannan - in the RED LION HOTEL, Falkirk, on WEDNESDAY the 16th day of December current, at Twelve o'Clock Noon.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 17th December 1863

THE REGISTRAR-GENERAL'S SPURS TO REFLECTION.

The Registrar-General's report on the Births, Deaths' and Marriages during the quarter ending 30th September, 1863, showed that over the whole of Scotland the births were in the annual proportion of 1 in every 29 of the population, the illegitimate births being as 1 in every 10 births; the deaths, 1 in every 17; and the marriages, 1 in every 159. It may interest our readers if we now give the results of these tables as regards every separate parish in the Stirling district.

In Stirling during the quarter 1 in every 9 births illegitimate; the deaths in the annual proportion of 1 in every 37; and the marriages in the annual proportion of 1 in every 92.

Falkirk, (burgh and landward,) 1 in every 13 births illegitimate; deaths 1 in every 52; marriages 1 in every 101.

 Alloa, 1 in every 26 births illegitimate; deaths 1 in every 37; marriages 1 in every 184.

Campsie, 1 in every 11 births illegitimate; deaths 1 in every 43; marriages 1 in every 231.

St. Ninians, (including Bannockburn,) 1 in every 8 births illegitimate; deaths 1 in every 49; marriages 1 in every 151.

Kilsyth, 1 in every 11 births illegitimate; deaths 1 in every 40; marriages 1 in every 127.

Tillicoultry, 1 in every 4 births illegitimate; deaths 1 in every 21; marriages 1 in every 126.

Denny, 1 in every 24 births illegitimate ; deaths 1 in every 36; marriages 1 in every 156.

Kirkintilloch, 1 in every 12 births illegitimate; deaths 1 in every 34; marriages 1 in every 136.

Larbert, 1 in every 13 births illegitimate; deaths 1 in every 45 ; marriages 1 in every 178.

Clackmannan, 1 in every 18 births illegitimate; deaths 1 in every 21; marriages 1 in every 368. Auchterarder, 1 in evcry 3 births illegitimate; deaths 1 in every 53; marriages 1 in every 210.

Crieff, 1 in every 4 births illegitimate; deaths 1 in every 45; marriages 1 in overy 280.

Polmont  - curiously enough, there are no births, deaths or marriages in this parish during the quarter. Alva, 1 in overy 9 births illegitimate; deaths 1 in every 45; marriages 1 in every 410.

Kilmadock, 1 in every 6 births illegitimate; deaths 1 in every 103; marriages 1 in overy 276.

Dunblane, 1 in overy 5 births illegitimate; deaths 1 in every 129; marriages 1 in every 193.

Logie, 1 in every 7 births illegitimate; deaths 1 in every 54; marriages 1 in every 435.

Muiravonside, 1 in every 25 births illegitimate ; deaths 1 in every 66; marriages 1 in every 95.

Blackford, 1 in every 3 births illegitimate; deaths 1 in every 40; marriages 1 in every 521.

Callander, 1 in every 3 births illegitimate; deaths 1 in every 38; marriages 1 in every 419.

Kincardine, no illegitimate births; deaths 1 in every 49; marriages 1 in every 592.

Lecropt, no illegitimate births ; deaths 1 in every 29; marriages 1 in every 132.

Aberfoyle, no illegitimate births; deaths 1 in every 282; marriages 1 in every 282.

Port of Monteith, no illegitimate births ; deaths 1 in every 68; marriages 1 in every 343.

Dollar, 1 in every 8 births illegitimate; deaths 1 in every 41; marriages 1 in every 222.

Airth, no illegitimate births; deaths 1 in every 25; marriages 1 in every 99.

Baldernock, 1 birth, and that one illegitimate ; deaths 1 in every 44 ; marriages 1 in every 90.

Balfron, 1 in every 5 births illegitimate; deaths 1 in every 63; marriages, 1 in every 250.

Bothkennar, 1 in every 23 births illegitimate; deaths, 1 in every 108; marriages 1 in every 430.

Buchanan, no illegitimate births; deaths 1 in every 33; marriages 1 in every 352.

Drymen, 1 in every 6 births illegitimate; deaths 1 in every 40; marriages 1 in every 401.

Dunipace, no illegitimate births; deaths 1 in every 18; marriages 1 in every 72.

Fintry, no illegitimate births; deaths 1 in every 57; marriages 1 in every 85.

Gargunnock, no illegitimate births; deaths 1 in every 182; marriages 1 in every 364.

Killearn, no illegitimate births; deaths 1 in every 42; marriages 1 in every 580.

Kippen, 1 in every 6 births illegitimate; deaths 1 in every 61; marriages 1 in every 143.

Slamannan, 1 in every 12 births illegitimate; deaths 1 in every 38; marriages 1 in every 145. Strathblane,1 in every 7 births illegitimate ; deaths 1 in every 173; marriages 1 in every 694.

This summary shows some very extraordinary results, particularly as regards the state of morality in the district; and that our readers may see and judge for themselves at a glance, we reiterate its results in a tabular form. During the quarter ending 30th September, the illegitimate births have been, in –

In the ratio 1 in every                                    In of the ratio of 1 in every

Aberfoyle                                                         Fintry

Airth                                                                  Gargunnock

Alloa 26                                                            Killearn

Alva , 9                                                              Kilmadock 6

Auchterarder 3                                                Kilsyth 11

Baldernock 1                                                   Kincardine

Balfron 5                                                          Kippen 6

Blackford 3                                                      Kirkintilloch 12

Bothkennar 23                                                Larbert 13

Buchanan                                                         Lecropt

Callander 3                                                       Logie 7

Campsie 11                                                      Muiravonside 25

Clackmannan 18                                             Polmont

Crieff 4                                                              Port of Monteith

Denny 21                                                          Slamannan 12

Dollar 8                                                             St Ninians 8

Drymen 6                                                          Stirling 9

Dunblane 5                                                       Strathblane 7

Dunipace                                                          Tillicoultry 1

Falkirk 13

Correspondents residing on the spot would greatly favour us if they could throw any light on the puzzling state of things indicated in the above table. How does it come that in Alloa only 1 in every 26 births are illegitimate, and in the neighbouring parish of Tillicoultry it is 1 in every 4, and in Alva 1 in every 9 ? Is the manufacture of ale more conducive to virtue, than the manufacture of shawls ? What peculiar and unfortunate cause is at work in the Western District of Perthshire, to raise the parishes therein to an almost uniform illegitimate notoriety - Callander lin every 3; Auchterarder ditto; Crieff ditto; Dunblane 1 in every 5, and Doune 1 in every 6. The inhabitants of these parishes are, generally speaking, engaged in agricultural pursuits; at least contrasted with mining and manufacturing places like Campsie, Kirkintilloch, Kilsyth and Denny, they are as the parish of Fintry to the town of Glasgow. And yet the four last-named parishes are twice as virtuous, though they contain a larger proportion of what is ignorant and loose in human nature. Is there anything in the air, whisky, or water, which can possibly explain away the low state of morality which seemingly prevails between this and Perth, and the comparatively high ditto between this and Glasgow. Then, again, travelling westwards, we find Drymen, Kippen, and Balfron, about a par of wickedness, and the contiguous parishes of Killearn, Fintry, Gargunnock, Kincardine, and Port of Monteith, paragons of innocence and morality. But to come still nearer home, how does it come that Bannockburn and St Ninians are worse than Stirling, and Stirling very much worse than Falkirk ?

 

 

 

 

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 24th December 1863

PROPERTY AND INCOME-TAX, 1863-64.

COUNTIES OF STIRLING, LINLITHGOW, Sc CLACKMANNAN.

THE COLLECTOR respectfully intimates to parties charged under the PROPERTY and INCOME TAX ACTS, that he will be at the undermentioned places, to receive Payment, on the days and hours specified; and as he will only have Receipts with him, applicable to the different Districts, parties are requested to attend at the places mentioned, and bring their Printed Notices with them: -

POLMONT –

Within Maxwell's Inn, upon Wednesday the 13th January next, from 9.30 a.m. to 12 Noon, for the Parishes of POLMONT and MUIRAVONSIDE.

 

 

1864

Stirling Observer Thursday 7th January 1864

PROPERTY AND INCOME-TAX, 1863-64.

COUNTIES OF STIRLING, LINLITHGOW, & CLACKMANNAN.

THE COLLECTOR respectfully intimates to parties charged under the PROPERTY and INCOME TAX ACTS, that he will be at the undermentioned places, to receive Payment, on the days and hours specified; and as he will only have Receipts with him, applicable to the different Districts, parties are requested to attend at the places mentioned, and bring their Printed Notices with them: -

POLMONT –

Within Maxwell's Inn, upon Wednesday the 13th January next, from 9.30 a.m. to 12 Noon, for the Parishes of POLMONT and MUIRAVONSIDE.

 

Glasgow Herald Monday 25th ;Caledonian Mercury Wednesday 27th; Stirling Observer Thursday 28th January 1864

 MARRIAGES. At Auchengain, on the 22nd instant, by the Rev. William Begg, Mr. John Robertson, farmer, Avonbridge, to Janet, daughter of Mr. Thomas Johnston, farmer, Auchengain.

 

Glasgow Herald Saturday 20th January 1864

SCOTCH BANKRUTS, (From the Edinburgh Gazette of Yesterday.)

APPLICATION FOR CESSIO BONORUM.

Robert Aitken, sometime spirit-dealer, Kelvinhead, near Kilsyth, now labourer or mineral borer, Avonbridge, and presently prisoner in the prison at Stirling.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 18th 25thFebruary 3 rd March 1864

MUIRAYONSIDE GRASS PARKS,

SATURDAY, 5th MARCH.

To be Let, by Public Roup, on SATURDAY the 5th March, 1864, THE GRASS PARKS on the Estate of MUIRAVONSIDE, comprising ELEVEN ENCLOSURES, to be Let for Sheep, Cattle, and Horses, as formerly. Roup to begin with the Parks at Drumbowie at One o'Clock Afternoon, and to finish with the Parks at Seatrees, &c.

JAMES NEILSON. Auctioneer.

 

Dundee Advertiser Saturday 5th March 1864

FALKIRK.

FATAL ACCIDENT.—

Wednesday the 24th ult, a young boy, named David Smart, residing Redding Muir, about three miles from Falkirk, met with an accident which terminated fatally on Monday morning last. The deceased had accompanied his sister to the smithy at No. 5 Pit, and while returning home with their father's picks, which were at the blacksmith's for being sharpened, the poor lad stumbled and fell over a pin which was projecting above the old wagon road, on which he was travelling. The consequence was that one of the points of the pick which the boy was carrying penetrated his windpipe, injuring him fatally. The unfortunate lad was seven years of age.

 

Dundee Advertiser Saturday 5th Belfast News-letter Monday 7th March 1864

MARCH FAIR.—

This annual fair for cattle and horses was held Thursday, at Callander Riggs. There was an unusually large attendance of dealers and farmers. Numerically the show stock was about an average, but the quality all kinds was indifferent. Business opened stiff, and continued so throughout. Prices were nominally unchanged, though practically weaker in some cases. Mr. Duncan, cattle-dealer, Newton of Falkland, Fifeshire, bought a lot of milch cows at an average of £12 a-piece. Mr. William Brock, Denny, sold his milch cows at from £10 to £13. Mr. Rennie, Bonnyfield, sold his milch cows at from £11 to £12, Mr. Gentleman, Avonbridge, sold a lot of grass beasts at from £4 to £6 13s. Mr. John Goodwin, Peathill, sold milch cows at from £10 to £12, and one — a neat little beast—at £16. Mr. Andrew Liddell, Denny, sold his milch cows at from £11 to £13, Mr. Aitken, sold milch cows at from £10 to £12, Mr. Andrew Liddell, Denny, sold his milch cows at from £11 to £13. Mr. Aitken, Fogger Mountain, Linlithgow, sold his milch cows at from £9 to £11 and £13, calving cows at £8, and grass beasts at £5 a head. One lot of one-year-old Highlanders fetched £5 a-piece. The horse market was dull.

 

Stirling Observer 24th March 1864

SHERIFF PLEADING- DIET.

On Friday, before Sheriff Robertson, the following cases were brought at the instance of John Gair, Esq., Procurator Fiscal, Falkirk: -Andrew Jolmie, was charged with theft and previous conviction, in so far as on the night of the 25th, or morning of the 26th December, 1863, be stole from a gatekeeper's lodge, on the Slamannan and Bo’ness Railway, at Blackston Junction, the following articles, the property of Matthew Russel, or Magaret Shanks or Russel his wife :- A pair of sheets, fine pillow-slips, a linen shirt, two pair of stockings, cotton screen, a quilt, a bedcover, a tin-pitcher, two pinafores, two child's bibs, and a harn bag; as also two pairs of stockings, two pair scissors, a crotchet collar, cap or "mutch," a wincie frock, a pair of stockings, a shift, a handkerchief, and two short-gowns. Also on the night of the 14th January, 1864, at a mineral bore on the farm of Candie, occupied by Robert Mirke, farmer, he opened a lock-fast chest, and stole an oil can, a saw, a hammer, and axe, the property of William Bell, mineral borer, Avonbridge; also, from the hedge adjoining the farm of Mainsland, on the 20th January, 1864, he stole a pair of blankets, the property of James Taylor, He pled not guilty, and was adjourned to Friday next

 

Glasgow Herald Wednesday 20th April 1864

GRASS PARKS &c to Let

TO BE LET, the GRAZING on the FARM of HEIGHTS, near Avonbridge. The Grazing over the whole of this Farm, extending to about 200 Acres, exclusive of the Moss Ground, is to be Let for the Pasturage of either Cattle or Horses, from 2nd of May to the 11th Nov. next. James Black, Gamekeeper, Tannoch, near Heights, will point out the Boundaries; and Offers will be received either by G. Fyffe Christie, Writer, 62 George Square, Glasgow, or H. Robertson, Factor, at Drumpellier, by Coatbridge, up to 26th Inst.

Drumpellier, 12th April, 1864.

 

Glasgow Herald Tuesday 26th Stirling Observer Thursday 28th April 1864

FALKIRK

FATAL ACCIDENT, -

 A young man 17 years of age, named Robert Wilson, son of David Wilson, farmer, Glenside, near Muiravonside, was accidentally killed on the Blackbraes Railway, about five miles from Falkirk, on Thursday evening, while attempting to jump on to a train while in motion. It would appear that after he had run a short distance alongside of the trucks he leapt up on one of them, but missed his hold, and fell upon the rails, when one of his feet was severed from his body, and a hurled to a considerable distance. He was also so severely injured in the abdomen that his bowels protruded, and he died in ten minutes after the accident in the arms of the engine-driver, who had stopped the train and gone to his assistance.

 

Newcastle Journal Monday 23rd May, Fife Herald Thursday26th May, Newcastle Courant Friday 27th May1864

SCOTCH SEQUESTRATIONS. (From the Edinburgh Gazette of Friday, May 20.)

WM. ANDERSON, Craigbank, near Avonbridge, county of Stirling builder.

 

Dundee Courier Monday 23rd May 1864

William Anderson, builders: Craigbank, near Avonbridge, in parish and county Stirling — Creditors meet in Red Lion, Falkirk .., 3lst May at two o'clock.

 

 

Dundee Advertiser Monday 23rd May1864

MAY FAIR.—

The annual Falkirk May Fair for the sale of cattle and horses was held on Thursday at Callender Riggs. The display of stock was about an average, and there was a numerous attendance of buyers and dealers. Business opened languid, and continued so throughout the day; but prices for all kinds were pretty well maintained. Altogether, the market was regarded as a low dear-selling one; and at the close a number of animals remained unsold. The following are the principal quotations Mr. Henry Aitken, Avonbridge, sold a lot of grass beasts at £10 a-head to Mr. Jones, flesher, Falkirk. Mr. John Goodwin, Peathill, Denny, sold his milk cows at from £12 to £18. Mr. David Nicoll, livestock agent, Falkirk, bought a lot of grass beasts at from £7 to £9, and milk cows at from £12 to £14. Mr. William Brisk, Denny, sold his calving queys at from £10 £12 12s, and grass beasts at £7 5s. Mr. Petter Scott, Yetts-o'-Muckhart, bought calving cows at from £12 to £15. Mr. William Duncan, Fife, bought a lot milch cows, selected from the general stock, at £14 on the average. Mr. David Duncan, Falkland, bought a lot year-old stots at £l 5s a-piece, and a lot of calving beasts at from £10 to £10 10s. Mr. James Graham, Myothill, Denny, sold a lot of two-year-old stots at £8 15s; a lot ditto at £7 10s; a lot of two-year-old queys at from £7 10s to £8; and milch cows at from £9 to £14 10s. Mr. Andrew Liddell, Denny, showed a capital lot of milch cows, and sold at from £12 to £16. He refused £36 for pair of three year-old queys. There was a good show of horses, but the market was dull, and no sales effected of any importance. A show of stallions in connection with the fair took place at two o'clock, when number of splendid animals were exhibited.

 

Perry’s Bankrupt Gazette Saturday 28th May 1864

SCOTCH SEQUESTRATIONS. - May 20, 1864. ANDERSON William, builder, Craigbank, near Avonbridge, in Slamannan: 31st May 2, Red Lion hotel, Falkirk. Claims Sept. 20

 

Glasgow Herald Tuesday 7th, Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette Thursday 9th June 1864

MARRIAGES

June 2, St. James's, Piccadilly, by the Hon. and Rev. John Sandilands, Captain and Brevet-Major William Stirling, R.A., third son of Charles Stirling, Esq., of Muiravonside, Stirlingshire, to Anne Douglas Stirling, daughter of the late Sylvester Douglas Stirling, Esq., of Glenbervie, Stirlingshire.

 

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 16th  June 1864

FAIR.

LINLITHGOW JUNE FAIR.

Friday, June 10. This fair was held to-day on the usual stance at the west end of the burgh. The stock brought forward consisted of Ayrshire milch cows, grazing beasts of different breeds, and a few young bulls. The show was about an average of the corresponding markets last year, and so was the quality of all kinds. There was a want of buyers, and sales were dull. In point of fact, the market was bad one for sellers, and at the close a great many animals remained unsold. The prices of all descriptions of stock were a shade less than those current at recent markets. The following may be accepted as the general prices of the day:- The best, milch cows from £12 to £16; secondary kinds from £6 to £11 10s; two-year old Ayrshire grass beasts at from £7 10s to £8 10s; and yearlings at from £5 10s to £6 10s; and Irish year olds at from £4 10s to £5. We subjoin few of the chief transactions :–  Cattle. Mr William Duncan, Falkland, Fife, bought a lot of calving cows at £12 a piece, and lot of stirks for grazing purposes at £6. Mr Gentleman, Avonbridge, near Linlithgow, sold his calving cows at from £16 downwards, and grass beasts at £11. Mr Gentleman bought milch cows at £17 to £18. Mr Andrew Liddell, Denny, showed a large lot of milch cows, and sold at from £12 to £16. Mr Arkley, Kingsfield, sold his calving queys at £8 10s., and queys for grazing at £7 2s 6d. Mr Peter Scott, Yetts o' Muckhart, bought lot of one and two year old grazing beasts from £7 to £9; a lot of Irish calves at £4 10s; and a lot of milch cows at from £10 to £12. Mr Henry Aitken, Linlithgow, sold his milch cows from £13 to £15; and a two-year old bull at £7. Mr James Graham, Mythoill, sold a large lot of grazing two-year-olds at £6 10s; a lot of milch cows at £10 10s; and a pair of two-year-old Ayrshire bulls at £7 a piece. - Horse Market.-There were not many horses shown and no sales of any importance were made. Mr Miller, Linlithgow, had the largest stud, and found a very dull market.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 23rd June 1864

MARRIAGES

WALKER - MORRISON. - At Boxton, Muiravonside, on the 17th inst., by the Rev. Wm. Tullo, George Walker Panston Green, to Miss Jean Morrison, daughter of Mr. James Morrison, farmer, Boxton.

 

Glasgow Herald Monday 27th June, 8th 11th July, 30th August, 27th September 1864

DESIRABLE ESTATE AND RESIDENCE IN THE FAVOURITE AND FERTILE COUNTY OF STIRLING,

FOR SALE. UPSET PRICE, £20, 00.

To be Sold, by Public Roup, at Dowell's, 18 George Street, Edinburgh, on Wednesday the 27th July next, at Two o'clock, unless previously disposed of by private bargain, THE ESTATE of CRAIGEND, in the Parish of Muiravonside and County of Stirling. This Property is judiciously subdivided and tastefully intersected by thriving Plantations. The Arable Lauds are nearly all Drained, and except such as are occupied by the Proprietor, are Let to substantial and enterprising Tenants. The House is surrounded by fine Timber, with beautiful Shrubberies; has an approach of nearly a mile in length, with Porter's Lodge and Gate; and Is situated about two miles distant from the Polmont Station of the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway, and situated about four miles from Linlithgow and Falkirk. The Game has been strictly preserved, is abundant, and the Linlithgow and Stirlingshire Foxhounds hunt the district, If desired, the Mineral on a considerable portion of the Estate can be bad. The Public Burdens are very moderate.

For particulars, apply to Messrs. Gibson-Craig, Dalziel &Brodies, W.S., Edinburgh;

Messrs. Russel & Aithen, Writers, Falkirk; or to the Proprietor, at Craigend House.

 

 

 

Glasgow Herald Monday 27th June 1864

LINLITHGOWSHIRE.

SALE OF MILLS, MILL LANDS, HOUSES, AND VALUABLE WATER-POWER, NEAR LINLITHGOW BRIDGE,

To be Sold, by Public Roup, within Cay & Black's Rooms, George Street, Edinburgh, upon Wednesday the 13th day of July, 1884, at Two o'clock Afternoon, in virtue of the Powers contained In a Bond and Disposition in Security, ALL and WHOLE the MILLS and MILL LANDS of LINLITHGOW, DWELLING HOUSE, STABLE, and GRANARIES connected therewith, and the astricted MULTURES and PERTINENTS of the same, situated upon the River Avon, near the Village of Linlithgow Bridge, and about a mile to the west of the Town of Linlithgow, all a presently tenanted by Mr. John Braes, The Mills consist of Corn, Barley, Flour, and Malt Mills,- and they are driven by Water-power, of which there it an abundant supply. A Steam-Engine of Ten Horse-power, which has been little used, was erected some years ago, and will be Sold along with the Mills. The Mills being within a mile of the County Town of Linlithgow, and about the same distance from the Station of the Monklands Railway at Causeswayend, are most eligibly situated for carrying on a very extensive Trade; and as the Water- power from the River Avon is constant and valuable, it might be applied to more extensive works, erected either in connection with the Mills or as a separate establishment,

For particulars, apply to Mr. John Walker, W.S., 2 Queen Street, Edinburgh; or to Messrs. Glen & Henderson, Writers, Linlithgow,

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 18th August 1864

REGISTRATION OF VOTERS.

COUNTY OF STIRLING.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That in terms of the 8th Section the Act 24 and 25 Victoria, Caput 83, LISTS of PERSONS entered in the REGISTER of VOTERS for the COUNTY of STIRLING who have Died or become Disqualified, and of Persons who have become entitled to VOTE in the ELECTION of MEMBER of PARLIAMENT for the said COUNTY, have been prepared; and that Copies of such Lists will be open to the inspection of all Persons, without payment of any fee, at the Office of the Assessor, 12, Murray Place, Stirling, between the hours of Ten o'Clock in the Morning and Four o'Clock the Afternoon of each day, except Sunday, from the 15th to the 25th days of August current, both inclusive. Persons qualified to Vote, whose names have been erroneously struck out or omitted from the said Lists, may lodge claims with the Assessor on or before the 25th instant. Persons whose names are entered on the Register of Voters may object to the name of any other Person being entered or remaining on the said Register, provided notice of such objection be given to the Assessor, and person objected to, on or before the 25th instant.

WILLIAM VOST.

Assessor of the County. 12, Murray Place, Stirling,

11th August, 1864.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 18th 25th August 1864

COUNTY OF STIRLING.

REGISTRATION OF VOTERS' COURTS.

INTIMATION IS HEREBY MADE, that the SHERIFF of the COUNTY of STIRLING has given notice, in terms of the Acts 2d and 3d William IV., chap. 65, 19th and 20th Victoria, chap. 58, and 24th and 25th Victoria, chap. 83, that on the days, and at the places after specified, he will hold Open Courts, for the purpose of REVISING and CORRECTING the REGISTER of VOTERS for the COUNTY of STIRLING, and deciding the merits of all Claims for Registration, within the same, Objections to these Claims, and Objections to Persons continuing on the Roll of Voters, viz. :-

for the Parishes of FALKIRK - So far as not comprehended in the Burgh of Falkirk.

AIRTH, LARBERT, BOTHKENNAR, POLMONT, MUIRAVONSIDE, and SLAMANAN.

THOMAS L. GALBRAITH, Sheriff-Clerk.

Sheriff-Clerk's Office, Stirling, 16th August, 1864.


Stirling Observer Thursday 18th August 1864

HAY AND POTATOES, AT GREENWELLS,

MONDAY, 22d August.

 TO be Sold, Public Roup, on MONDAY the 22d day August, 1864, on the Farm of possessed William Neilson,

EIGHTEEN HUNDRED STONES OF RYEGRASS AND CLOVER HAY 17 Ricks;

THREE ACRES POTATOES.

 The usual Credit.

Roup to begin with the Hay Five o'Clock, and with the Potatoes at Half-past Five,

 JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Caledonian Mercury, Glasgow Herald Tuesday 9th London Standard, Dundee Courier,Wednesday 10th Western Daily Press, Birmingham Daily Press, Thursday 11th Exeter and Plymouth Gazette, Dundee Perth and Cupar Advertiser, Friday 12th  Leamington Spa Courier, Bristol Mercury, Saturday 13th August 1864

SERIOUS AND FATAL COLLISION ON THE MONKLANDS RAILWAY.

A serious and fatal collision occurred on Friday night on the Bo'ness' branch of the Monklands Railway, by which one man lost his life and six others sustained injuries of greater or less severity. The accident, occurred at Binniehill Colliery, about half a mile from Slamannan, and the circumstances which gave rise to it are as follows:- about ten o'clock in the evening in question the driver of an engine, -which was in at Kipps for repairs, received orders to proceeded to Avonbridge to lift loaded waggons and carry them through to Bathgate. The driver-, whose name is Robert Stirling, having been officially informed that the line- which is a single one - was all clear, at once proceeded to carry out his instructions. Contemporaneous with the dispatch of this engine it would appear that another was under orders to proceed from Borrowstouness to Binniehill Colliery, which, we believe, is about midway between the two starting places, which are clearly the opposite extremes of the line. Neither of the engines, it is reported, carried lamps, though the night was dark and telegraphic communication suspended through the offices being closed The consequence was that both engines were approaching close quarters before either was descried by the men in charge, and a frightful collision occurred near the place already indicated. The effects of the concussion, though most severe and alarming, was in a measure neutralised by the immediate application of the brakes on the engines coming in sight. As it happened one man was sacrificed, and nine others placed in extreme peril. Six of these however, received injuries more or less of a severe character. It is a remarkable fact that the man who lost his life and those wounded all occupied places on the engine which was going from Kipps to Avonbridge. Nine of the men in the engine conveying the waggons from Bo'ness to Binniehill were not hurt in any way, a circumstance which is no doubt to be attributed to the fact that the effect of the shock was deadened by the weight of the waggons behind. One of the trucks was completely destroyed, and the engines were damaged to the extent of £300. The name of the man who was fatally injured was James Moffat, line inspector, aged forty years. Mr. Moffat was badly scalded in addition to sustaining other injuries, and died on Saturday evening. The following are the names of the other six men who were injured:-Robert Stirling, engine- driver, bruised on right shoulder and right thigh; Joseph Ramsay, fireman, Bo'ness, severe shock' to whole body; Robert Robertson; James Crossley,- Brownrigg, badly scalded on thighs and legs; Hugh McManus, labourer, Brownrigg, cut on right side of head; and Edward Cassidy, bruised on right knee and left ankle.

 

 

 

 

Glasgow Herald Wednesday 17th August 1864

THE HOME FARM OF PARKHALL TO LET,

As at Martinmas, 1864.

 THE HOME FARM and LANDS of PARKHALL,in the Parish of Muiravonside, and Shire of Stirling extending to 145 Acres, or thereby. The Farm lies within about 4 1/2 miles from Falkirk, 3 1/2 from Linlithgow, and 1 1/2 from Polmont Station on the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway, is of good quality and capable of bearing all kinds of crops. The Union Canal bounds the Farm, and is convenient for bringing forward manure. The Farm will be Let for 19 Years, or such other period as may be agreed on. The present Tenant does not offer.

For particulars, apply to the Proprietor, T. Livingstone Learmonth, Esq. of Parkhall,; or to Russel & Aiken, Writers, Falkirk, with either of whom Offers may be lodged up to 31st August next.

Falkirk, 7th July, 1864.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 18th August 1864

GROWING CROP, LINT, HAY, DRAUGHT HORSES, &c

On the FARMS of MANUELRIGG & CRAIGEND, TUESDAY, 23d AUGUST.

Sold, by Public Roup, on TUESDAY the 23d August, 1864, on the Farms of Manuelrigg and Craigend, in the Parish of Muiravonside, belonging to J. L. Learmonth M'Kenzie, Esquire, THE Whole GROWING CROPS, HAY, and HORSES, on the above Farms, comprising –

65 Acres of OATS,

10 Acres of BARLEY,  

2 Acres of BEANS,

11 Acres of LINT,

3 Acres of POTATOES,

6 Ricks RYEGRASS HAY,

1 Five-year-old BAY DRAUGHT HORSE,

1 Five-year-old DARK CHESNUT MARE,

Four-year-old BROWN DRAUGHT HORSE, and GREY DRAUGHT HORSE, rising Four years old.

The Crops are very Excellent, and the Horses are First-class, and True-drawing.

Four Months' Credit on Bills, or Discount for Cash.

Roup to begin with the Crop at Manuelrigg at Eleven o'Clock.

 JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 25th August 1864

County Voters. The following list of the voters for 1863-1864, from which it will be seen that there is decrease of 21:

Falkirk District.

                                             1864                     1863

Falkirk,                                200                       202

Airth,                                   49                          49

Larbert,                               72                          73

Bothkennar                        34                          32

Muiravonside,                   66                         69

Polmont,                            74                          70

Slamannan,                        87                          84

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 25th August, 1st September 1864

COUNTY OF STIRLING.

VALUATION OF LANDS AND HERITAGES, Statute 17 & 18 Vic, Cap. 91.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That the COMMISSIONERS OF SUPPLY of the COUNTY OF STIRLING will hold COURT, upon the days, and at the places under-mentioned, for the purpose of hearing APPEALS against the Valuations made by the Assessor for the current year under the abovementioned Statute, viz. : -

At FALKIRK, upon THURSDAY the 15th day of September next, within the Court-House there, Half-past 12 o'Clock Afternoon, for Appeals from the Parishes of

AIRTH,

 BOTHKENNAR,

 FALKIRK,

MUIRAVONSIDE,

POLMONT,

SLAMANNAN.

NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN, That to entitle Parties to be heard on Appeal, Notice in Writing must be given to the Assessor at least Six Days prior to the aforesaid 14th and 15th days of September, that the Appellant intends to maintain his Appeal, and the amount of Valuation which alleges should be substituted for the amount stated by the Assessor must be specified in said Notice.

By order of the Convener,

ROB. CAMPBELL, Clerk of Supply.

Stirling, 24th August, 1864.

 

Glasgow Herald Friday 26th August 1864

DEATHS.

 At Redford, Muiravonside on the 23d instant, John Graham, Esq. of Redford.-Friends are requested to accept of this intimation.

 

Morning Post Monday 5th, Glasgow Herald Tuesday 6th, Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette Thursday 8th, Hampshire Telegraph Saturday 10th September 1864

At St. Jude's, Southsea, on the 1st instant, by the Rev, Robert Wedgwood, rector of Dumbleton, Gloucestershire, assisted by the Rev. T. B. Brownrigg, incumbent of the district, Andrew, eldest son of Charles Stirling, Esq. of Muiravonside, Stirlingshire, to Georgina Louisa, second daughter of the late Sir Henry Martin Blackwood, Bart.

 

Glasgow Herald Thursday 6th October 1864

MARRIAGES

At Parkhall, Muiravonside, on the 5th instant, by the Rev. James M'Farlane, Andrew Brown, draper, Linlithgow, to Jessie, eldest daughter of Mr. Henry Mungall, farmer.

 

Glasgow Herald Thursday 19th October, Dundee Courier, Stirling Observer, Thursday 20 October 1864

MARRIAGES

At Avonside Cottage, Muiravonside, on the 18th inst, by the Rev. Don. McLeod, Robert Spence, Esq., M.D., Linlithgow, to Christina Miller, eldest daughter of John Wilson, Esq., Almond Ironworks .

 

Stirling Observer, Thursday 27th October, 3rd 10th November 1864

STIRLINGSHIRE.

TO LET, For such a term of Years may agreed on, with Entry at Martinmas first, 1864,

THE FARM BOXTON, with the TWO PARKS at BOXTON-RIG-HEAD, all situated in the Parish of Muiravonside, and lately possessed by the late William Salmond, and now by his son.

For particulars, apply to Trail & Murray, W.S., 7, Melville Street, Edinburgh.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 17th 24th November 1st 8th 15th 22nd December 1864

ASSESSED TAXES, 1864-65. APPEAL COURTS-COUNTY OF STIRLING.

THE COMMISSIONERS of SUPPLY for the several DISTRICTS of the COUNTY of STIRLING will MEET, on the Days and at the Places undermentioned, to hear and determine Appeals against Charges made by the Surveyor for the current year: -

PARISH of FALKIRK - and for the Parishes of Airth, Bothkennar, Larbert, Muiravonside, Polmont, and Slamannan - in the Red Lion Hotel, Falkirk, on THURSDAY the 22d day of December proximo, at Twelve o'Clock Noon.

JAS. CHRYSTAL,

Clerk to the Commissioners.

Stirling, 16th November, 1864.

London Daily News Saturday 19th November 1864

ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS OF ENGLAND.- The following gentlemen having undergone the necessary examinations for the diploma were admitted members of the College at a meeting of the Court of Examiners on the 18th inst., viz. :-

(Among others) John Moorehead McFarlan, Muiravonside, Stirlingshire.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 22nd 29th December 1864

FAT CATTLE, FAT SHEEP, AND MILCH COWS,

AT THE CROWN INN, FALKIRK,

THURSDAY, 29th DECEMBER.

MR. JAMES NEILSON begs to announce that he will Sell by public Roup, at the Crown Inn, Falkirk, on THURSDAY the 29th December, 1864.

8 Fat Shetland and Cross-bred CATTLE, from the feeding Byres of Muiravonside, of First Quality.

Also at the same time will be Sold 20 Fat SHEEP, and 10 Pure-bred Ayrshire MILCH COWS, recently calved, or near the Calving.

THE USUAL CREDIT.

Roup to begin at One o'Clock precisely.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 29th December 1864

PROPERTY AND INCOME-TAX. YEAR 1864-65. PARTIES CHARGED under the PROPERTY and INCOME -TAX ACTS for the current Year, will have an Opportunity of Paying their Assessments to the Collector, at the following Places, the Days and between the Hours mentioned, viz.: -

POLMONT - For the Parishes of POLMONT and MUIRAVONSIDE, within MAXWELL'S INN, on SATURDAY the 14th January, from 10 A.M. to 1 P.M.

1865

Stirling Observer Thursday 5th 12th January 1864

PROPERTY AND INCOME-TAX.

YEAR 1864-65.

PARTIES CHARGED under the PROPERTY and INCOME -TAX ACTS for the current Year, will have an Opportunity of Paying their Assessments to the Collector, at the following Places, the Days and between the Hours mentioned, viz.: -

POLMONT –

For the Parishes of POLMONT and MUIRAVONSIDE, within MAXWELL'S INN, on SATURDAY the 14th January, from 10 A.M. to 1 P.M.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 12th January 1864

DEATHS.

Forgie.  - At Lochead, Muiravonside, on the 4th inst., Mary Forgie, in her 78th year.

 

Dunfermline Saturday Press 25th March 1865

FALKIRK.

Fatal Accident on the Blackbraes Railway A boy named John Thomson, aged thirteen years, a greaser on the Blackbraes Railway, and residing with Anthony Murray, Causewayend, accidentally lost his life on Tuesday afternoon. He was seated in one of a number of waggons which were being removed from Blackbraes to Causewayend, when three of them, including the one on which he was riding, ran off the line near the bridge at Maddiston. Thomson was thrown out upon the line, and eight of the trucks passed over him in succession, cutting his body in two.

 

Glasgow Herald Monday 27th March, 23rd June 1865

ESTATE IN THE COUNTY OF STIRLING FOR SALE.

UPSET PRICE REDUCED.

To be Sold, by Public Roup, within the Faculty Hall, St. George's Place, Glasgow, on Wednesday the 5th day of April, 1865, at One o'clock Afternoon, THE Very Desirable ESTATE of TARDUF, This Property consists of the Lands of Greenknowe, Over and Nether Gillandersland,  Cairneymount, and other, all lying contiguous. It is situated about four miles west from Linlithgow, and two and a half miles from the Polmont Station of the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway at which station trains from Edinburgh and Glasgow stop almost every hour of the day. The property extends to 163.453 Acres of which the great portion is Arable, the remainder lying either under plantation or occupied with the house and B---- and three small Fues. The Mansion House has recently been greatly extended, but is not yet finished. It contains Dining Room, Drawing Room, Library, Seven Bed Rooms, four Dressing Rooms, ample Servants' accommodation, and all necessary conveniences for a large Family. There is a Three Stalled Stable, Double Coach House, Harness Room, and other Offices, all in good order. The rental is about £370, and the Public and Parochial Burdens are about £20 per annum.

The term of Entry will be Whitsunday, 1865.

The Property will be shown by Lames Ryrie, Overseer at Tarduf; and for further particulars application may be made to James Wylie Guild Esq., Accountant, Glasgow; Messrs Dundas & Wilson O.B. (?), Edinburgh; or Messrs Stevenson & Fleming, Writers, Glasgow, the last of whom are in possession of the Title Deeds and Articles of Roup.

Glasgow, March, 1865

 

 

Dundee Advertiser Tuesday 23rd May 1865

FALKIRK

MAY FAIR – The May fair at Falkirk was held on Thursday, The show of cattle and horses was rather better in point of numbers than that of last year. In cattle the prices were dear, and the sales, although not brisk, fair in number, “Fancy” prices were common, ranging from £13 to £18, Ayrshires in calf being in strong demand. Mr. Graham of Myothill sold 46 grazing and milch cows at prices ranging from £12 10s to £15 10s to Mr. Johnstone, banker, Bathgate; he sold a lot of three-year-old queys at £11 each to Mr. Stewart, flesher, Bo’ness, and a lot of fat Highland queys at £10 10s each. Mr. James Hillhouse, sold a couple of Ayrshires in calf at £38. Mr. Hardie, Eskend, sold a good fair Ayrshire at £15 10s, and a grazing ox at £9. The leading buyers – including Mr. Aitken, Avonbridge; Mr. Goodwin, Peathill, Denny; and Mr. Duncan, Fife – were present, and transacted business; but owing to the stiffness experienced, a considerable number of beasts were driven off unsold. The horse market was pretty extensive in bulk, but prices were remarkably low, and a very dull sale.

 

Glasgow Herald Wednesday 9th August 1865

DESIRABLE ESTATE AND RESIDENCE FOR SALE,

AT A CONSIDERABLE REDUCTION ON FORMER UPSET PRICE.

 To be Sold  by Public Roup, at Dowell's, 18 George Street, Edinburgh, on Wednesday, 20th Sept., at Two'clock, unless previously disposed of by private bargain, THE ESTATE of CRAIGEND, in the Parish of Muiravonside and County of Stirling, This Property is tastefully intersected by thriving Plantations, and the House beautifully surrounded by Shrubberies and Timber, having an Approach of nearly a mile, with Gate and Lodge, and, is about two miles distant from Polmont Junction of Edinburgh and Glasgow railway.

For particulars, apply to Messrs. Gibson-Craig, Dalziel & Brodie, Thistle Street, Edinburgh.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 10th  August 1865

CAUTION TO BULLET PLAYERS

On Wednesday, John and Gilbert Fowler, miners, Arnloss, were brought before Sheriff Sconce, for contravention of the “Statute Labour Roads Act,” for having been guilty of bullet playing on the road leading from Arnloss to Avonbridge. John was fined 10s. and 15s. expenses; Gilbert, 5s. and 10s. expenses.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 31st August 7th September 1865

COUNTY OF STIRLING.

VALUATION OF LANDS AND HERITAGES,

Statute 17 & 18 Vic, Cap. 91.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That the COMMISSIONERS of SUPPLY of the COUNTY of STIRLING will hold a COURT, upon the days, and at the places under-mentioned, for the purpose of hearing APPEALS against the Valuations made by the Assessor for the current year under the abovementioned Statute, viz.: -

at FALKIRK, upon THURSDAY the 14th day of September next, within the COURT-HOUSE there, at Half-past 12 o'clock Afternoon, for Appeals from the Parishes of

AIRTH,

BOTHKENNAR,

FALKIRK,

MUIRAVONSIDE,

POLMONT,

SLAMANNAN.

NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN, That to entitle Parties to be heard on Appeal, Notice in Writing must be given to the Assessor at least Six Days prior to the aforesaid 11th and 14th days of September, that the Appellant intends to maintain his Appeal, and the amount of Valuation which he alleges should be substituted for the amount stated by the Assessor, must be specified in said Notice.

By order of the Convener. ROB. CAMPBELL, Clerk of Supply.

Stirling, 24th August, 1865.

 

Dundee Courier Thursday 14th September 1865

FALKIRK TRYST

WEDNESDAY, September 13.

The proceedings of this market were concluded to-day, when the show of cattle was the largest that has been seen on the third day of Falkirk September Tryst for a number of years. This was caused by a fresh contribution of cattle from Ireland, which arrived in Glasgow yesterday. The remainder of the stock on sale was the residue of the previous days’ market, and consisted of Irish stirks, and a few West Highland queys. All the lots were examined by the inspectors as they entered the market, and pronounced to be in a healthy state. There were very few buyers in attendance, and the most of the lots of cattle in consequence stood desolate all the day. Bargains were very slowly made, and any sales effected were slightly under the prices current yesterday. Among the attractions, the following took place: - Mr. MaNaughton, near Castlecary, sold a lot of 20 Highland queys at £6.10. Mr. Donald McCrimmon, Glenelg, sold a lot of three-year-old Highland stots at £12 a-piece; and a lot of 40 stirks at £3 10s. Messrs Spence and sons, salesmen, Glasgow, sold a lot of Irish stirks at £5 5s. Mr. Murray, Ireland, sold a lot of 20 Irish bullocks to Mr. James Graham, Myothill, at £9 10s each. Mr. Hope, Carbrock, bought a lot of Irish stots at £5 3s 6d. Mr. Wm. Dawson, Dunipace, sold on Tuesday a lot of 20 crosses two-year-olds at £13 each. Mr. Alex. Graham, Larbert, sold a very superior calving quey to Mr. John Wilson, Avonbridge, at £26. The number of horses on sale to-day was considerable. The show included some very good Irish animals, but the others were of an inferior stamp. Mr. Christie, Stirling, sold to Mr. William Dunse, Newcastle, 20 Highland ponies at £7 a-piece, other 20 at from £4 to £6, and cart horses at from £15 to £34. Mr. Scott, Yetts of Muckhart, sold cart horses at from £25 to £30, and one at £40. Mr. Robert Allan, Glasgow, sold cart horses at from £15 to £27. At the close a good part of the Irish cattle and the most of the horses remained unsold.

 

Dunfermline Saturday Press Saturday 16th September 1865

DISTRICT NEWS

STIRLING.

Pit Accident. - Alexander Ballantine, aged 20, engineer in a coal pit near Campbeltown, was killed last week by being struck on the head with a shaft while in motion. Deceased was of excellent character, and a native of Blackbraes, Muiravonside, Stirlingshire.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 16th November 1865

ASSESSED TAXES, 1865-66. THE COMMISSIONERS of SUPPLY for the several DISTRICTS of the COUNTY of STIRLING will MEET, on the Days and at the Places undermentioned, to hear and determine Appeals against Charges made by the Surveyor for the Current year : -

For the BURGH and PARISH of FALKIRK - and for the Parishes of Airth, Bothkennar, Larbert, Muiravonside, Polmont, and Slamannan - in the Red Lion Hotel, Falkirk, on THURSDAY the 16th day of November proximo, at Twelve o'clock, Noon. JAS. CHRYSTAL, Clerk to the Commissioners. Stirling, 25th October, 1865.

 

Glasgow Herald, Lancaster Gazette Saturday 18th November 1865

NORTH BRITISH RAILWAY.

A Railway, hereinafter called Railway No. 4, commencing in the Parish of Muiravonside, in the County of Stirling, by a junction with the Slamannan and Borrowstounness Branch of the North British (late Monklands) Railway, at a point thereon 600 yards or thereabouts southward of the Bridge which carries the Turnpike Road between Linlithgow and Polmont over the said Branch, and terminating in the Parish of Muiravonside, in the same County, by a junction with the North British (late Edinburgh and Glasgow) Railway, at or near a point thereon 140 yards or thereabouts west from the west end of the Viaduct which carries the last-mentioned Railway over the River Avon; which Railway and Works will be wholly situated in the Parish of Muiravonside and County of Stirling. And it is proposed by said intended Act to authorize deviations from the line of levels of the intended lines of Railways as shown upon the Plans and Sections thereof hereinafter referred to, within the limits usually authorized by Parliament, or to be prescribed by the said Act, and to confer power for the compulsory purchase of lands and buildings in the several parishes, townships, and places aforesaid, or some of them, and also for the purchase of lands and buildings by agreement; and to cross, stop up, alter, or divert, temporarily or permanently, all or any roads, streets, highways, railways, tramways, river, streams, reservoirs, canals, navigations, waters, water-courses, mains, pipes, bridges, telegraphic wires or apparatus, erections, or works of any description, which it may be necessary or convenient so to stop up, alter, or divert, for the purposes of the undertaking, and to vary or extinguish all existing rights and privileges connected with any land or building to be purchased, or which would or .might in any way prevent or interfere with carrying into effect any of the objects of the intended Act, and to confer other rights and privileges; and to levy tolls, rates, duties, and charges, and to alter existing tolls, rates, duties, and charges, and to confer, vary, or extinguish exemptions from tolls, rates, duties, or charges.

 

 

1866

Stirling Observer 4th 11th January 1866

PROPERTY AND INCOME-TAX.

YEAR 1865-66.

THE COLLECTOR respectfully intimates to PARTIES CHARGED under the PROPERTY and INCOME TAX ACTS, that he will be at the undermentioned Places to receive Payment, on the Days and Hours under specified; and as he will only have Receipts with him applicable to the different Districts, Parties are requested to attend at the places mentioned and bring their Printed Notices with them : 

POLMONT –

For the Parishes of POLMONT and MUIRAVONSIDE, within MAXWELL'S INN, on SATURDAY the 13th January, from 10 A.M. to 1 P.M.

 

Stirling Observer 25th January 1866

FALKIRK

Sudden Death. –

On Wednesday night, a quarryman, residing at Maddiston, named James Kay, died suddenly in bed. He retired to rest along with his wife in his usual good health, but about 11 o'clock, Mrs. Kay heard a gurgling in her husband's throat, and spoke to him without getting any reply. She then at once got up, and called in a neighbour, only to find her husband, however, lifeless. Deceased, who was 34 years of age, leaves a child on the breast of his widow

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 10th May 1866

SUDDEN DEATH. –

On Saturday as John Gray, labourer, was returning home from Avonbridge, and when about fourteen yards to the South of Avonbridge Railway Station, he observed a man lying on the road with blood issuing from his mouth and nose, apparently dying. Gray at once went to the public house of James Bell, of Avonbridge, and secured the assistance of the landlord and another man. The three immediately went to the spot where the man was lying, and identified him as Robert Paterson, sixty- seven years of age, a hawker, residing in Avonbridge. Immediately after being lifted up, he drew a long breathe and expired.

 

Glasgow Herald 14th September 1866

BOY DROWNED IN A WELL.-

An accident of a most distressing nature took place near Maddiston on Saturday, under the following circumstances:-Shortly after one o'clock on the afternoon of that day, a boy named John Stavert, eight years of age, residing with his grandfather at Cairneymount, in the neighbourhood of the village of Maddiston, was sent to draw water from an open well a short distance from the house. For this purpose he was provided with a small pint pitcher. About ten minutes after the boy left the house, his grandmother went out to seek him, and on looking into the well was horrified to find that he had fallen into the water. Assistance having been procured, the body was taken oat, and medical aid sent for. Dr. Hadden was shortly afterwards in attendance, and did all he could to restore animation, but life was found to be quite extinct. The mournful event has cast quite a gloom over the village, and much sympathy is felt for the bereaved relatives. The well, we may state, is only five feet in depth, and it is conjectured that the accident happened by the boy missing his footing.

 

 

 

Stirling Observer 18th October 1866

LIST OF APPLICATIONS for CERTIFICATES for the SALE OF EXCISABLE LIQUORS for the COUNTY of STIRLING, for NEW PREMISES, by NEW TENANTS or OCCUPANTS, and for RENEWAL of TRANSFERRED

CERTIFICATES

 

Name Designation and            Place and Parish of County of Premises.        Class of Certificate    Name and Address of Landlord

Residence of Applicant                       Place.                Parish.                                       applied for                                 or Factor of Premises.

                                                                   BY TENANTS OR OCCUPANTS

Charles Rankine, Publican,      Maddiston,     Muiravonside,                             Public House                         Robert Robertson,

 Maddiston, Muiravonside,                                                                                                                                         Farmer,Netherton                                            

                                                                                                                                                                                              Proprietor

 

Glasgow Herald Saturday 27th October 1866

FALKIRK

SERIOUS - ACCIDENT – A HORSE KILLED.

An accident happened on Thursday night at Avonbridge, a few miles from Falkirk, by which a horse was killed, a gig destroyed, and another considerably damaged. It would appear that Mr. James Waddell, farmer, Woodend, in the parish of Torphichen, was on his way home from Falkirk Feeing Fair in a gig, and was returning from Bulliondale Farm, where he had been calling, to get on to the turnpike road, about ten o’clock on the night in question. At the same time it unfortunately happened that a “hire” from the Crown Inn, Falkirk was going towards Bulliondale Farm, and in consequence, as it is alleged, of Mr. Waddell taking the wrong side of the road, the two horses came into violent collision, and resulted in the immediate death of the Crown Inn horse, one of the shafts of Mr. Waddell’s gig entering its breast and penetrating the heart. The gig belonging to the Crown Inn was completely desatroyed, and one of the shafts of the other machine was broken. None of the men in the gigs were injured. The Falkirk police were engaged yesterday investigating the matter, and the information they obtained is likely to result in Mr. Waddell being brought up on the charge of malicious mischief – he having, it is alleged, broken open the front door of Bulliondale farmhouse, and smashed the fan glass immediately above it.

FEEING FAIR

This great half-yearly hiring market for farm servants was held yesterday, and was as usual very numerously attended both by male and female servants. Long before mid-day the High street was so crowded from side to side as to be almost impassable, and presented a scene of bustle and gaiety only to be witnessed twice a year, and perhaps not surpassed at any other market of the kind in Scotland. The number of servants open to engagements was quite as large as that at the April Fair, and there being the brisk demand for both males and females a slight rise in wages took place. This was particularly the case with good hands, who experienced little difficulty in obtaining engagements, as well as an advance on their former fee. It was remarked that the wages were considerably higher than those current in the Lothians, as some men from these parts could have been engaged at less money than is being paid in the Stirlingshire district. First-class men were getting from £12 to £15 per half-year, with the usual allowances; second class from £8 10s to £11 10s; third class, from £6 to £8; and young lads from £3 to £4. Female servants – dairymaids, from £3 10s to £5; second class from £2 15s to £3 5s; and girls from £1 5s to £2 10s. The weather was uncommonly fine, and the ordinary amusements of the occasion were engaged in heartily throughout the day.

 

 

1867

Stirling Observer 3rd 10th January 1867

PROPERTY AND INCOME-TAX, 1866-67.

COUNTIES OF STIRLING, LINLITHGOW, & CLACKMANNAN.

THE COLLECTOR respectfully intimates to parties charged under the PROPERTY and INCOME TAX ACTS, that he will be at the undermentioned places, to receive Payment, on the days and hours specified; and as he will only have Receipts with him, applicable to the different Districts, parties are requested to attend at the places mentioned, and bring their Printed Notices with them: -

POLMONT - Within Maxwell's Inn, upon Saturday the 12th January next, from 10 am to 1 p.m., for the Parishes of POLMONT and MUIRAVONSIDE.

 

Falkirk Herald 10th January 1867

THE FOXHOUNDS – The Linlithgow and Stirlingshire foxhounds meet to-day (Thursday), January 10, at Winchburgh; Saturday, Jan. 12, at Bathgate Toll; Tuesday, Jan.15, at Laurieston Kennels; Thursday, Jan. 17, at Avonbridge; Saturday, Jan. 19 at Hainingside – each day at 10.45 a.m.

 

Falkirk Herald 17th 24th January, 7th 14th February 1867

TO LET,

THE FARM of COXHILL, in the Parish of Muiravonside, and County of Stirling.

The Farm contains 89 imperial acres, or thereby, of excellent land, all drained, every 18 feet, within the last seven years. There is a first-rate House of 5 Rooms, W.C., Kitchen, and Servants' Room. The other Buildings are ample for the land. Bowhouse Station is half-a-mile from the Farm.

Offers will be received up till the 15th February, by Alex. Cuthill. 51 Rose Street, Edinburgh.

 

Stirling Observer 24th January 1867

CURLING

DENNY (LESLIE PARK) V. MUIRAVONSIDE. –

These clubs met on Thursday to compete for one of the Royal Caledonian Curling Club medals. The match took place on Larbert Loch, and each club was represented by four rinks. The ice was very much twisted, but the play notwithstanding was, on the whole, tolerably good. At the close, the Muiravonside Club was declared victorious by the large majority of 49 shots. This is the first time the Leslie park curlers have suffered defeat for a number of years. Mr. James Laing, Denny, officiated as umpire, and at the close of the game handed over the medal to the winning club.

 

Falkirk Herald 31st January 1867

CURLING.

SLAMANNAN V. MUIRAVONSIDE. –

On Tuesday week the Slamannan and Muiravonside Curling Clubs had a friendly game, on Ellrigg Loch. The weather was brisk and frosty, and the ice was in beautiful condition. There were three rinks from each club, and the play generally was good. After three and a half hours' exciting play, victory declared itself in favour of the Slamannan club by a majority of forty-three. The following is the score:

 SLAMANAN.                      MUIRAVONSIDE.

George Waddell,39          Peter Forgie 13

Matthew Hay, 26              John Baird, 14

James M'Killop, 24           John Robertson 19

89                                         46

Majority for Slamannan, 43.

POLMONT AND WESTQUARTER CLUB.

Jan. 19th –

Polmont and Westquarter Club met the Vellore Club on Vellore Pond with three rinks aside, and after a contest of three hours, Polmont and Westquarter gained by 36 shots. At the close of the game, J. G. Urquhart, Esq., gave the players a substantial luncheon. It may he mentioned that the Vellore Club was only formed this year through the energy of J. G. Urquhart, Esq. of Vellore, who has at great expense constructed a pond for the benefit of the club, which shows that he is also a keen supporter of the roaring game, as well as of other sports.

 

Falkirk Herald 31st January 1867

Local Intelligence

Fatal, Railway Accident. Peter Duncan, a railway guard on the North British Railway, residing at Craigend, near Muiravonside, met his death on Tuesday last on the North British Railway, near the Almond Iron Works, in a very singular way. Deceased, along with a companion, named Felix Hart, were engaged shunting several trucks on to the main line of rails by means of a rope attached to an engine. The rope having been fastened to the engine and the trucks, deceased gave the signal to the driver to start the engine, which was accordingly done. Deceased, who happened to be betwixt the two lines at the time, was struck somewhere about the head by the rope, and fell insensible on the ground. He was at once removed to the office of the Almond Ironworks, where he died in about five minutes afterwards. Dr. Moffat of Polmont was immediately in attendance, but his services were of no avail, as life was quite extinct. Deceased was 42 years of age, and has left a wife and family to mourn his loss.

 

Falkirk Herald 7th 14th February 1867

CROP STOCK, AND STOCKING, AT GLENEND,

On FRIDAY, 15th FEBRUARY.

To be Sold by Public Roup, at Glenend, in the Parish of Muiravonside, on Friday the 15th February, 1867, the Whole CROP, STOCK, and STOCKING, belonging to Mr. John Heigh, consisting of - 

8 Stacks of Oats,

1 Stack of Beans,

1 Rick of Ryegrass and Clover Hay,

2 Ricks of Seed Hay,

2 Work Mares,

3 Milch Cows,

2 Six-quarter Bulls,

1 Quey Calf,

1 Shot Pig,

2 Carts, with Wheels and Axles,

1 Hay Cart, Wheels and Axle,

2 Iron Ploughs,

1 Iron Drill Plough,

1 Iron Grubber,

1 Pair Iron Drill Harrows,

2 Pair Harrows,

1 Turnip Sowing Machine,

1 Stone Roller and Frame,

2 Sets of Cart and Plough Horse Harness,

2 Boilers, with Furnaces complete,

A Four-horse Thrashing Mill,

A large Quantity of Manure ;

With the whole of the Small Farming Implements, Dairy Utensils, &c. ;

Also, 1 1/2 ACRES OF YELLOW TURNIPS, AND Several Articles of HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE.

THREE MONTHS' CREDIT ON BILLS, OR DISCOUNT FOR CASH.

Sale to commence at Twelve o'clock. DAVID NICOL, Auctioneer.

 

Falkirk Herald 7th February 1867

AVONBRIDGE.

CURLERS' SUPPER. –

The annual supper of the Muiravonside Curling Club took place in Middlestone School-room, on the evening of Tuesday the 29th ult. - James Dougall, Esq , of Craigend Brickworks, in the chair. Grace having been said by the chairman, an excellent supper, served up in Mrs. Cunningham's best style, was partaken of. The chairman then gave the usual loyal and patriotic toasts, which were all duly honoured and cordially responded to; after which he called for a special bumper for the toast of the evening, "Curling, and the success of the Muiravonside Curling Club," which was received with boisterous applause. Other toasts were, "The President, John L. Learmonth M'Kenzie, Esq., of Craigend," by Mr. James Bell; " William Stirling, Esq., J.P., of Tarduff, and family," " Success to our noble opponents, the Slamannan curlers." The chairman then presented Mr. Andrew Stevenson with a handsome pair of curling-stones and silver-mounted handles, given by the club. Mr. Stevenson made a feeling reply. Several other toasts were given, and a number of excellent songs enlivened the meeting; and after joining in a verse of " Auld Lang Syne," the company broke up at a seasonable hour.

 

Falkirk Herald 14th February 1867

MUIRAVONSIDE.

The third annual ploughing match of the Muiravonside Ploughing Society took place on Wednesday last week, on the farm of Hillhead, possessed by Mr. Robertson. Twenty-four competitors appeared on the ground, being an increase over former years, which shows that the efforts of the society are being appreciated by the agriculturists in the parish.

The judges - viz., Messrs Robert Ferguson, farmer, Greenrigg ; Donald McArthur, overseer, Inveravon ; and Peter Gray, overseer, Woodbank  - awarded the prizes as follows: -

Senior Class 1st, £1, and Highland and Agricultural Society's Medal, John Gentleman servant to Mr. Learmonth, Parkhall ; 2d, £1, David Bennie, servant to Messrs J. & J. Dougal, Knowhead ; 3d, 15s, Alexander Taylor, servant to Mr. Inglis, Easter Manuel ; 4th, 10s 6d, James Bennie, servant to Mr. Walker, Candy end ; 5th, 7 s 6d, George Strathie, servant to Mr. Inglis, Manuelhaugh ; 6th, 5s, John Graham, servant to Mr. Learmonth, Parkhall; 7th, a whip given by Mr. William Roberts, saddler, Polmont, Samuel Smith, servant to Mr. Robertson, Maddiston.

Junior Class. 1st, 10s 6d, given by Messrs J. & J. Allan, Bo'ness, and a medal given by Mr Bauchop Castlehill, Andrew Baird, servant to Mr. Stevenson, Drumbroider ; 2d, 10s, given by Mr. Robertson, Hillhead, Peter Morrison, servant to Mr. Robertson, Kaemuir; 3d, 6s, John Meikle, son of Mr. Meikle, Candy; 4th, 3s 6d, Thomas Storer, son of Mr. Storer, Gateside.

Extra Prizes. A pair of leather leggings, given by Mr. Calder, draper, Falkirk, for the most useful pair of horses on the ground, Mr. Kirkwood, Bogo.

A number of members of the society afterwards met in the house of Mr. James Bell, Avonbridge, where an excellent dinner was discussed, Mr. Bauchop, Castlehill, occupying the chair.

 

 

 

 

Falkirk Herald 14th February 1867

MANUEL GRASS PARKS.

MR. JAMES NEILSON will Let by Public Roup, for Pasture, for the ensuing Season, on Tuesday the 5th March next, SIX GRASS PARKS On the property of Manuel, in the Parish of Muiravonside. The Parks are of various sizes, and are all good Grass.

Roup to begin at Entryhead at Twelve o'clock Noon. February, 1867.

 

 

 

Falkirk Herald 14th February, Glasgow Herald 27th February 1867

DESIRABLE RESIDENCE.

To be Let, for One or more years,

TORAVON HOUSE, about a mile South of Polmont Station, Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway. The above is beautifully situated on the rising ground of Muiravonside. The House consists of dining-room, drawing-room, parlour or library,8 bed rooms, laundry, scullery, &c., with Coach House and four-stalled Stable, Walled Garden of about Half an-Acre, Gardener's House, abundance of spring water, and every accommodation for a Family, More or less Ground could also be given. Grates and a considerable quantity of Furniture already in the House. The premises can be seen on any lawful day.

Rent Moderate.

 Apply to Messrs Whytock & Co., 9 George Street ; or W. H. Muir, 18 Picardy Place, Edinburgh.

 

Falkirk Herald 14th February 1867

THE LATE PETER CRAWFORD.

The death of Sergeant Peter Crawford has removed from the scene the best known man, perhaps in this part of the country. While Peter distinguished himself as a police-officer, he was a big hearted man, obliging and ever pleasant – elements which are frequently said to be foreign to the nature of policemen. Peter's death was not unexpected but still it has none the less excited general regret in the community; and the esteem of all classes, the vagrant section included, have followed him to the tomb. Though Peter may be said to have died in harness, he was, for a year previous to event, in indifferent health, and it was only within the last fortnight that he relinquished his duties, after an uninterrupted service extending over a period of 25 years. Before he finally lay down he was seen to visit the grave in which he now lies buried and we may suppose that he was not unmindful of heavenly things, and that he knew full well his end was rapidly approaching. On Sunday night he breathed his last. Peter was born at Linlithgow Bridge in the summer of 1802, and was consequently coming into his 65th year. He spent his early manhood in driving a milk cart, and was afterwards employed as policeman at Slamannan while the railway there was in course of construction. In 1842 he was appointed rural policeman for Falkirk and by the excellent performance of his multifarious and unenviable duties, he soon found favour in the eyes of the people. Indomitable energy, complete self-mastery, instinctively shrewd and smart in the adoption of the means to the end, and of a strong constitution, singled him out as a man eminently fitted for the position to which he was elected. The criminal classes knew this well, for few indeed who committed any crime escaped the penalty with which it was associated. Peter was familiar with all his "children," and was moreover thoroughly acquainted with their respective tendencies, and could lay his finger on them when wanted. While he was esteemed by the well-doing people, he was a terror to them who did evil. He was not harsh, however, in his treatment of those who might unfortunately come under his notice, and instead of using force would say, kindly "K’wa, k’wa, the fiscal wants to speak to you ; he'll no hinder ye a minute - maybe yell get half-a-crown for being a witness." Many instances are told in which this policy succeeded, while had the more high-handed method been adopted the consequences would probably not have been so satisfactory or so pleasant. In one case it is related that a strong, fearless moulder, at one time employed in Carron, was wanted for a serious assault, and despite every effort he for a long period escaped detection. The matter was entrusted to Peter, who having ascertained that the moulder was at his occupation at Carron, hired a vehicle and went down to apprehend him if possible. Peter's quick eye was not long in finding the delinquent, and going towards him, he gave his familiar tap on the shoulder, and says K’wa, k’wa - the fiscal's wanting ye." The moulder turned round fiercely, and demanded what the fiscal wanted with him. "Oh," says Peter, " to be a witness in that business - ” ye'll be paid for't - ”never mind your coat, yell no be lang hindered." The bait took, the result was that the hitherto unapproachable moulder got 60 days' imprisonment for the assault with which he was charged. In the means which Peter adopted to find out thieves he was none less successful. On one occasion a sheep went amissing about Stenhousemuir. The circumstance was reported to Peter, and he at once proceeded to investigate the matter. The first thing which he did was to go into one the schools in the village, and put the following question to the scholars: - "Noo, bairns, just tell wham a ye a' had beef the day to your dinner?" There was no response, and Peter proceeded to the next school and repeated the question, when one little urchin, more honest than his parents, exclaimed, had beef the day, and the skin's lyin below bed."  Peter had now all the information he wanted and, on examining the house where the boy's parents resided, he discovered the state of matters to be exactly as the little fellow had represented. There was sufficient evidence to prove the case, and the parties involved got seven years' transportation each, incidents similar to this could be multiplied by the score but the one given is sufficient to show the astute manner in which Peter went about his work in his eventful history, and in all the disturbance which he appeared as the conservator of the peace, Peter escaped invariably without injury. On one occasion, however, while bringing a man from Glasgow for cow stealing at Carmuirs, he made a somewhat extraordinary escape with his life. At this time trains were what were called the stand-ups, and Peter was handcuffed to his prisoner. Unobserved the fellow got the carriage door opened, and threw himself out, and by the suddenness of the movement, Peter was nearly following, when he seized a firm hold of the side of the carriage and bore himself and his prisoner up till he received assistance from the passengers, the thief was reinstated to his old position. He was pretty severely hurt by his escapade, and one Peter's wrists was cut and bruised. The charge this case was proved, and the cow stealer was sentenced to fourteen years' transportation. In 1843 he assisted in the apprehension of Allan Mair for murder of his wife at Muiravonside, and in all the crimes which have since disgraced the history of district, Peter, generally, had some important office to discharge in their expiscation, In 1845 he was presented with a handsome silver watch by the public of Falkirk for the faithful performance of his duties, and in a few years thereafter he received another present in the shape of a purse of soverigns. Till the passing of the General Police Act in 1858, Peter was the only constable in the district, and the reader may estimate the immensity of his work, while the older bairns can say how well it was executed. Indeed, it may be safely said that Peter, in his palmy days, was one of the best officers in Scotland. He appointed a sergeant in 1858, and continued so till his demise. On Wednesday, all that remained of him was consigned to the grave in the Established Church-yard in presence of the most influential company of mourners that has been seen at a funeral in Falkirk for a lengthened period. The bell tolled out its solemn note on the occasion, and the streets through which the funeral cortege passed were lined with hundreds of spectators. The body was carried shoulder high by Peter's co-workers, and the peagant altogether was solemn and suggestive. Considering the harrassing and fatiguing nature of his work, Peter may be said to have died full of years, and no lessfull of honours. General esteem has followed him to his last home, and we believe that even with the lamp of a Diogenes no one could be found who would speak otherwise than kindly of the memory of "Lang Peter."

 

 

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 21st February 1867

FAT CATTLE AT GOWANBANK

ON MONDAY, 4TH MARCH.

MR JAMES NEILSON begs to announce that he will sell by Public Roup, on MONDAY the 4th March 1867, at the FEEDING BYRES of Gowanbank, near Avonbridge, belonging to James Gowans, Esq., 12 FAT POLLED ANGUSSHIRE BULLOCKS, which have been fed upon Turnips and Hashed Grain,

and are of the first quality.

Roup to begin at Two o’clock.

MANUEL GRASS PARKS

MR. JAMES NEILSON will Let by Public Roup, for Pasture, for the ensuing Season, on TUESDAY the 5th March next,

SIX GRASS PARKS

On the property of MANUEL, in the Parish of Muiravonside.

The Parks are of various sizes, and are all good Grass.

Roup to begin at Entryhead at Twelve o’clock Noon.

February, 1867

 

Falkirk Herald 21st 28th February 7th March 1867

MUIRAVONSIDE GRASS PARKS,

On SATURDAY, 9th MARCH.

MR. JAMES NEILSON will Let by Public Roup, on the Estate of Muiravonside, belonging to Charles Stirling, Esquire, on Saturday the 9th March, 1867. THE GRASS PARKS On the Lands of Drumbowie, comprising 5 ENCLOSURES, To be Let for Cattle and Horses ; also, ONE FIELD OF YOUNG GRASS, To be Let for Sheep. Roup to begin at Two o'clock.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 21st  28th February7th March 1867

LET OF GRASS PARKS

ON AVONHILL. STIRLINGSHIRE.

THREE ENCLOSED PARKS OF PASTURE GRASS will be LET for the Season. Mr. MAIN, Loanend, Avonbridge, will point out the fields; the Offers may be addressed to CHARLES McBEATH, Fraserburgh, the Proprietor, till 8th March ensuing, when the Grass will be Let.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 28th February 1867

TEACHER WANTED

A TEACHER WANTED for DYKEHEAD SCHOOL, with Free House and Garden, and Sum of Money may be added – Applications with Testimonials, to be lodged with the Preses, JAS. JOHNSTON, Barns, Avonbridge, Falkirk, on or before Tuesday the 5th of March next.

Dykehead, 27th Feby., 1867.

 

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 28th February 14th 21st 28th March 4th April 1867

 (Special Circular for Gentlemen)

TAILORING DEPARTMENT

MESSRS GEO. FORRESTER & CO.,

64&66 STIRLING STREET, AIRDRIE,

Beg to inform Gemtlemen residing in Slammanan, Avonbridge, Camelon, Bonnybridge, and Neighbourhood that they have just added a TAILORING Department to their General Drapery Business, and have been successful in securing the services of a First-Class CUTTER, who was trained in the first Houses in London, Edinburgh and Glasgow, and who can be depended upon in giving a Good Fit.

Always on hand a Large Assortment of

BROAD BLACK CLOTHS, DOESKINS, SCOTCH TWEEDS, WITNEY’S MELTON’S &c.,

To select from, and Made Up on the shortest notice;

BOYS’ KILT & KNICKERBOCKER SUITS,

Very Neatly Made Up;

Also, LADIES’ JACKETS & PALETOTS.

FASHIONS RECEIVED MONTHLY.

Patterns Post-free on application.

Parties can be measured at their own residence (if the distance does not exceed 20 miles) without extra charge, and the Clothes returned by Rail, Cattiage paid.

All Suits warranted from 10s to 20s less than Edinburgh of Glasgow houses.

 

Falkirk Herald 7th March 1867

Situations

DRAINERS.

A NUMBER of MEN Wanted. –

Apply to Samuel. M'Kenzie, Glenend Farm, Muiravonside.

LABOURERS WANTED.

LABOURERS WANTED at STANRIGG COLLIERY, Slamanan.

Also, a Steady, Active MAN who can write and take charge of the weighing of the Coals on the Pithead, and who is acquainted with Waggon Trimming. –

Apply at the Colliery on or before Saturday, 9th March.

Mr. NEILSON’S SALES - Continued

MILCH COWS, QUEYS, CALVES,

AND FARM INPLEMENTS,

AT STRATH MILL,

ON SATURDAY, 23RD MARCH.

MR. JAMES NEILSON begs to announce that he has been instructed by Mr. Walter Gowans, Esq., to Sell by Public Roup, on SATURDAY the 23rd March, 1867, his very Select Stock of MILCH COWS, QUEYS, CALVES, and FARM IMPLEMENTS, at STRATH MILL near Avonbridge, in consequence of the Lands being laid down in permanent Pasture, comprising –

4 Famous Ayrshire Milch Cows, near the Calving,

3 Ayrshire Queys, in Calf,

2 Cross Shorthorn Stots, First Class Beasts,

3 Ayrshire Calves; and

A Quantity of the Newest Improved  FARM IMPLEMENTS,  by Ponton.

THREE MONTHS CREDIT ON APPROVED BILLS.

Roup to begin at One o’clock.

 

Stirling Observer Leeds Times 16th March 1867

THE OLD BODY-SNATCHERS AND THEIR CRIMES.

When Burke and Hare were arrested, and Burke convicted, in 1829, on a charge of murdering a poor old Irish mendicant, who had accepted their hospitality, all Scotland rang with execration on the number and villainousness of their crimes. Burke having obtained his priest's permission, made a full confession of his crimes. He owned to sixteen murders between the spring and the October of 1828. He and Hare had been first set on to it by an old drunken pensioner named Donald, dying of dropsy in Hare's house. After his coffin was closed, they decoyed the undertaker away with drink, took out the corpse, and filled the coffin with tanner's bark. They took the body in a sack to Dr. Knox, who gave them seven pounds ten for it. The first person they murdered was a woman from Gilmerton who came to lodge with Hare. After a revel, Hare closed her mouth and nose, and Burke lay upon her to keep down her arms and legs. They then put the corpse in a chest, and met Dr. Knox's porter by appointment at night at the back of the Castle, who took the box on to the class-rooms. The next victim was a miller named Joseph, who lay ill at Hare's lodging-house, as it was supposed of a fever, which kept away other lodgers. Burke held a pillow down over his mouth, and then lay across the body until he was dead. The price of the old pensioner's body had been a temptation which these monsters could not resist. On one occasion Burke met a policeman dragging a drunken woman to the West Port watchhouse. Burke, who had a good character with the police, volunteered to see her home; he took her to Hare's, and they murdered her like the others. One of the most revolting of Burkes murders was that of Daft Jamie, a poor halfwitted, barefooted lad, with a withered hand, who used to sing and dance about the Old Town, and pick up what alms he could. Mrs. Hare decoyed him to her house, under pretence of taking him to his mother, of whom the lad was peculiarly fond. Burke was taking a dram at the time at Rymer's shop, and Mrs. Hare came in for a pennyworth of butter, and stamped on his foot as a signal. Jamie would not take much whisky; but as he lay on the bed, Burke, eager, kept saying to Hare “Shall I do it now?" Hare replied, “Bide awhile ; he is too strong for you yet; you had better let him alone awhile." Burke at last, irrestrainable, threw himself upon the poor harmless lad, and they fell off the bed struggling. Roused to a sense of the imminent danger, Jamie leaped up, and by a dreadful effort threw off Burke, who then closed with him. Burke was for a moment almost overpowered. Shouting that he would run his knife into Hare unless he came and helped him. Hare ran, tripped up Jamie, dragged him about with Burke lying on him, and held his hands and feet till he was dead. It was after breakfast when Jamie was lured in. By twelve his body was in a clothes-chest of Hare's, and on its way to Surgeons-square. Burke gave the clothts to his brother's children, and they quarreled about them. The dress of the other persons had been destroyed to prevent detection. Burke also murdered a poor girl of loose character called Mary Paterson. He had taken her home, given her breakfast, made her drunk, and then butchered her. When inquiries were made, he said she had gone off to Glasgow with a packman. There were other murders still more terrible committed by these wretches. Hare one day invited a poor Irishwoman to his house, with her deaf and dumb grandson. They intoxicated her and then suffocated both herself and grandson. They crammed the two bodies into a herring-barrel. This they put in Hare's fish-cart and at dusk set out for Surgeons-square. The horse, a miserable half-starved beast, at the entrance to the Grass-market refusing to go a step further, a crowd assembled. Burke said he thought at that time that the old horse bad risen up in judgment against them. While the crowd tugged at the horse, Burke and Hare hired a porter with a hurley, and put the barrel on it to carry to Surgeons-square. The wretched horse was, in revenge, instantly taken to a tanyard and shot. While Burke and his wife were on a visit at Falkirk, during the festival of the anniversary of Bannockburn, Hare decoyed home a drunken woman, murdered her unaided, and sold her body for eight pounds. When Burke returned, and asked he had been doing any business, Hare replied in the negative; but Bnrke ascertained from Dr. Knox that he had brought a subject, and Hare then confessed the secret to his partner. They also murdered a married cousin of Burkes wife : Hare taking the chief part in the horrible business, because he was not a relation. They put the body in a "fine trunk" Paterson supplied. Broggan, in whose house they were, discovered tke murder, and they gave him three pounds, and sent him out of Edinburgh, to keep the secret. Another of their victims a Mrs. Hostler, a washerwoman at Broggan's. She had ninepence-half penny in her hand when they smothered her, and they could scarcely remove it after she was dead, it was clutched so hard. This poor woman had been heard on the evening of her murder singing "Home, Sweet Home," with Burke. The only person Burke murdered by himself was the daughter of Mrs. Holdane, whom they had previously disposed of. Burke also confessed that Hare's wife had urged him to murder the woman with whom he lived, but he would not agree to it. They were distrustful of her because she was a Scotchwoman. The plan was that he was to go into the country after the murder, and write word to Hare that she had died there, so as to deceive the neighbours. Nine of the people had been murdered in Burkes house (five of these in an inner room where he used to cobble shoes—it looked out only on the waste ground and the pig-stye), four in Broggan's room, two in Hare's stable, and one in Burkes brother's house. They had marked out a great many for murder, but were disappointed of them in various ways. They were generally drunk when they committed these murders, and also while the money lasted. They very often did not know the dates of the murders, nor the names of their victims. They had arranged a plan that Burke and another man were to go on a tour to Glasgow and Ireland, and to forward bodies to Hare for the surgeons. Their regular price was ten pounds in winter and eight pounds in summer. Burke said they had got so daring, that he believed they might have gone on even to seize people in the streets. At first they removed bodies only in the dark: latterly they grew more bold and went in the day time. When they were carrying the girl Paterson, some boys from the High School-yard followed them, crying, “They are carrying a corpse." They nevertheless got her safely delivered. Hare could sleep well after a murder, but Burke kept a "twopenny candle" all night by his bed-side, and a bottle of whisky. If he awoke, he sometimes gulped half a bottle at a draught, and that made him sleep. When their money was spent, they pawned their clothes, and took them out again as soon as they got a subject. The excitement in Edinburgh during Burkes trial was unequalled in intensity. The mob shouted for the blood of Hare, the two women, and Burkes other accomplices. Two guineas were offered the turnkeys for one peep at the murderer. Eager enthusiasts paid enormous sums for Burkes shoemaking hammer; and Hare's whisky-bottle brought a high price. The blood-soaked bed was cut up into relics, and the chairs were hollowed into snuff-boxes, Mrs. Burke, venturing back into the West Port, was nearly torn to shreds, and was besieged in the watchhouse. Fiually, she left the town and went to Glasgow. Mrs. Hare, alias Lucky Log, was pelted nearly to death with snowballs, mud, and stones ; was nearly killed also at Glasgow ; and eventually escaped to Belfast, quite indifferent to her husband's fate. It was felt to be a blot on Edinburgh, and a stain on Scotland; for although the two men were Irish, the woman who had been deepest in it was a native of Maddiston, in the county of Stirling. The populace were savage, also, against the doctors. The night of the trial, Dr. Knox's and Dr. Munro's class-room windows were broken, and, but for a stormy night, their houses might have been destroyed. The night before Burke’s execution, the gibbet had been raised by torchlight. An immense crowd remained till two in the morning, cheering as every fresh beam was fixed. Hundreds slept in the adjacent closes and on stairs, and at the windows of neighbouring houses in the Lawn Market. Many well-dressed ladies were among the spectators, and half a crown for a single hasty look from a window was freely given. By seven o'clock the rain had almost ceased. When the raw cold day had begun, every avenue to the High-street was thronged, and the area between the West Port and the Tron Church was one close-wedged mass of heads. About forty thousand persons were waiting eagerly for St. Giles's clock to strike eight. There were crowds on the Castlehill and in Bank-street, and stragglers as far as the Advocate's Library. The rough and ribald jests and street-cries changed to a demoniacal roar of joy when Burke appeared ascending the stairs to the platform; then there rose yells, savage curses, and stormy cries of “The Murderer!" “Burke him!" “Choke him, Hangie!" " Hang Hare, too !'' An Edinburgh mob is always fierce, and now their deepest passions were thoroughly roused. Burke stood before them at last, a thickset, cadaverous man, with very light hair, an old black coat too large for him, a white neckcloth, and mouldy boots. He turned deadly pale, and shook when he heard the appalling shouts: but he still cast at the heaving mob one look of fierce and desperate defiance. He then knelt and prayed, with his back to the people, and told the priest that he died in the full assurance that he should be saved. When he arose, he took up the silk handkerchief on which he had knelt, and carefully put it into his pocket. He looked at the gallows, and took his place on the drop, giving a withering scowl at a man who pushed him a little on one side. He told the hangman how to untie his neckcloth. As he put on the white cap, the yells grew tremendous. “Don’t waste rope on him," they cried. "You'll see Daft Jamie in a moment." But the murderer stood unflinching, and even manifested a repugnance to the cap being drawn over his face. He then said the Belief, uttered a cry to God, and, jerking the signal handkerchief from him angrily, fell and died with hardly a struggle.

 

Falkirk Herald 28th March & 4th April 1867

MR. NEILSON'S SALES.

TORAVON GRASS PARKS,

On FRIDAY, 5th APRIL.

MR. JAMES NEILSON

 Will Let by Public Roup, on Friday the 5th April, 1867, THE GRASS PAKKS on the LANDS of TORAVON, Near Maddiston, Belonging to W. H. Muir, Esq., For Grazing Sheep, Cattle, and Horses.

Roup to begin at Two o'clock

 

Falkirk Herald - Thursday 4th April 1867

SALE OF

MILCH COWS, YOUNG CATTLE, HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE, AT BEEDYKE,

NEAR AVONBRIDGE,

ON MONDAY, 15TH April.

To be sold by Public Roup, at BEEDYKE (about half a mile from Avonbridge), on Monday the 15th April, 1867

3 Milch Cows, 3 and 4 years old, 2 of them calved,

1 Two-year-old Quey,

1 One-year-old Do.,

1 One-year-old Bull,

1 Pet Ewe,

1 Fat Pig.

ALSO

A Chest of Mahogany Drawers, Eight-Day Clock in Mahogany Case, Close Press with Drawers, 3 Harwood Tables, a Dozen Hardwood Chairs; Grates, Fenders, and Fire Irons, with the whole of the Kitchen and Cooking Utensils, and a lot of Dairy Utensils.

THREE MONTHS CREDIT ON THE CATTLE

The whole to be Sold without Reserve, as the Exposer is leaving the country.

Sale to commence at Two o’clock Afternoon.

DAVID NICOL, Autioneer.

TO LET.

To be Let for such number of years as may be agreed on, THE HOUSES, and that Part of the LANDS of BEEDYKE, in the Parish of Muiravonside lying on the South side of the Bathgate Railway.

For particulars apply to the Proprietor, John Boyd, Babbitbill, who will receive offers till the 16th April current.

Babbithill, Ist April, 1867.

 

Falkirk Herald - Thursday 11th April 1867

MUIRAVONSIDE.

CONCERT.-

On Friday week, Mr. Simpson, teacher of music, gave one of his unique entertainments on Scottish songs in Muiravonside School-room. The initiatory part consisted wholly of Jacobite songs, which were rendered in first-rate style and in character - Mr. Simpson being in Highland costume. Before the singing, he gave a lecture upon our Scottish songwriters, Burns, Tannahill, Hogg, and Lady Newton as standing in the very first class. Hogg, he affirmed, was at the head of the Jacobite department. Each song was introduced by a criticism on its merits, and an account of the circumstances under which it was written. This can only be done properly by a poet; but Mr. Simpson possesses in a high degree the poetic faculty, and we are not sure but some of his own pieces would have pleased the audience as well as any given in the course of the evening, such, for instance, as the "Fold Stream Land." Mr. Simpson was assisted by Miss Bruce, from Edinburgh, a lady who is well known as a first-class singer in Edinburgh, Glasgow, and London. She excelled equally in the harmonious and the pathetic, and held the audience quite entranced while singing "Afton Water," "Clap your hands, bairnie," "The Flower o' Dumblane," "Whistle, and I'll come tae ye my lad," "Wee Jouky Daidles," and "Roy's Wife of Aldivalloch."

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 18th April 1867

COUNTY LICENSING- COURT.

The annual meeting of the Justices of the Peace, held for the purpose of granting licenses for the County, took place in the Justiciary Court-Room on Tuesday A. G. Speirs, Esq., of Culcreuch, Convener of the Court, presiding. The other Justices present were Sir J. E. Alexander of Westerton; Mr. Buchanan of Carbeth; Mr. Campbell of Boquhan; Provost Murrie; Mr. Wilson of Banknock; Dr. Muschet of Birkhill; Mr Wright of Broom; Mr. Blackburn of Killearn; Mr. Munnoch of Cringet, &c. The existing licenses having been read over by the Clerk, The Chairman asked with regard to those parties at present holding a license and who had during the year been convicted of a breach of their certificate whether the Justices would deal-with these cases at the present meeting; or if they would continue them until next court day, so that the bench might be made aware of the several offence for which the parties has been convicted. Mr. Wilson thought it desirable to pass over those who had been convicted once with the usual admonition, and let cases of those who had been twice convicted be continued till next Court day. Mr. Buchanan said this matter was before them last year, and they resolved at that time - seeing that "first convictions" were becoming so numerous - to inquire into the nature of the offences. After some further conversation, the meeting disposed of the cases of those parties who were present in Court, and continued the others.

Applications by Wm. Stevenson, for public house, Dunipace; John Smith, for inn and hotel, Falkirk; and Thomas Pennycuick, for public house, Loan, Muiravonside, were all remitted to the Falkirk Justices.

 

Glasgow Herald Monday 13th 15th 20th May, 6th 13th 20th 27th June 4th 11th July 1867

EILGIBLE INVESTMENT & DESIRABLE PROPERTY, WITH RESIDENCE.

FOR SALE, at Present, by Private Bargain, and at a Moderate Price, THE ESTATE of CRAIGEND, in the Parish of Muiravonside and County of Stirling, extending over 500 Acres, and situated about two miles from Polmont Junction, Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway, and one mile from a Station on Monkland and Bo'ness Railway, The Polices and Lands are tastefully ornamented with Shrubberies and Timber, and the Farms Let to substantial Tenants.

Apply to Messrs Gibson Craig, Daziel & Brodies, Edinburgh; M'Grigor, Stevenson & Fleming, Glasgow; or Russel & Aitken, Falkirk

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 30th May 1867

MUIRAVONSIDE.

The Bowling Green. - Muiravonside Bowling Green was opened on Saturday evening, when several matches were played. The Polmont Brass Band were in attendance. The members of the club take the opportunity of publicly thanking Mr. David Strang jeweller, Falkirk, for his very handsome present of silver medal, given to promote the welfare of the Working Men's Club in this district.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dundee Advertiser Saturday 1st June 1867

FALKIRK MAY TRYST

FRIDAY, MAY 32.

The third of the new Trysts established at Falkirk this year was held to-day on the usual stance at Stenhousemuir. The weather, though the wind was easterly, was pleasant enough, and the attendance of dealers and the general public was fully greater than at the two preceding markets. Unfortunately, however, the number of buyers present was unusually limited, which silted in the worst trade known in this part of the country. The clashing of the meeting with that at Stirling had, no doubt, an injurious effect on it, while owing to the want of grass, and absolute determination exists among farmers against increasing their stock till summer appears to have permanently set in. The sheep on sale to-day consisted mainly of half-bred and Cheviot hogs, a considerable number of which were from Dumfriesshire. A few cross hogs, and two lots of blackfaced ewes with their lambs were also on sale. For all kinds trade was uncommonly slow, and prices were a shade easier than last month. In the cattle market the supply from Ireland was exceedingly large, and included some very good lots of fresh healthy cattle. There was no sale, however, and at the close of the market fully three-fourths of them remained unsold. For Ayrshire milch cows there was a dull demand, while for grazing beasts of this breed the inquiry was more than usually restricted. Highland cattle would have met a fair market, but only a few lots were shown. The following, among other sales, were recorded:-

CATTLE

 Mr. James Graham, Myathill, sold a lot of two-year-old West Highland queys to Mr. Speak, Lancashire, at £8 8s, and a lot of stots to the same gentleman at £8, a lot of calving queys and milch cows at from £12 to £15 10s, and calving queys at from £8 to £10. Mr. Walker Smith, Edinburgh, sold Irish two-year-old bullocks at from £10 to £12 10s, and stirks at from £4 to £7. Mr. Dougall, Househill, sold three two-year-old Ayrshire bulls at £12 a-piece. Mr. Henry Flockhart, Edinburgh, bought a lot of two-year-old West Highland beasts at £6, and a lot of two-year-old Irish cattle at £8. Mr. Stark, Midcalder, bought milch cows at from “10 to £15. Mr. Henry Arthur, Avonbridge, sold milch cows at from £7 10s to £13. Mr. Willaim Brock, Denny, sold milch cows at from £8 to &14. Mr. J. Goodwin. Peathill, sold ditto at from £10 to £15. Messrs Tiernan & Son, Glasgow, sold a lot of two-year-old bullock at £10 12s 6d. Mr. Rennie, Bonnyfield, sold 23 milch cows at prices ranging from £10 10s to £14.

SHEEP-

Mr. Kennedy, Edinburgh, bought a lot of Cheviot hoggs a 22s 6d, and a lot at 18s 6d. Mr. Mudall, Dumfries, sold a lot of Cheviot hoggs at 23s. Messrs Swan & Sons, salesmen, Edinburgh, sold a lot of Cheviot hoggs to Mr. Logan, Legerwood, at 20s; a lot of blackfaced ewes and lambs at 27s; and half-bred hoggs at from 22s to 28s. Provost Keir, Falkirk, bought a lot of half-bred hoggs at 30s. Mr. Stark, Camelon, bought a lot of half-bred hoggs at 22s; a lot of Cheviot hoggs at 10s; and a lot of blackfaced ewes and lambs at 27s. Mr. Ross, Glasgow, sold a lot of half-bred hoggs at 26s. Mr. Forgie, Edinburgh, sold a lot of Cheviot hoggs at 18s; and a lot of crosses at 24s. Generally Cheviots hoggs ranged from 18s 6d to 23s, and half-breds from 28s to 35s.

In the horse market no business of importance was transacted.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 6th June 1867

THE MUIRAVONSIDE GAMES are fixed to come off on FRIDAY the 12th July, on the same as last year.

By Order of the Committee,

DANIEL BINNIE, Secy.

Bowhouse.

 

 

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 4th 11th July 1867

MUIRAVONSIDE GAMES will take place on FRIDAY the 12th July on the Grounds of VELLORE.

Games to commence at 12 o'clock, when PRIZES will be awarded for open competition in Vaulting, Mile Race, and Donkey Race. For particulars see Handbills.

DANIEL BINNIE, Secy. Bowhouse, Muiravonside.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 18th July 1867

MUIRAVONSIDE. ANNUAL GAMES.

These games, which were instituted last year, came off on Friday in a field adjoining Vellore Castle, kindly granted by the public-spirited proprietor, John G. Urquuart, Esq. The weather was delightful, the sun being obscured by fleecy clouds which drifted lazily along the sky, while a fine cool breeze blew from the east, thus rendering the day one of the most pleasant that could have been wished for. The view from the field is magnificent embracing, as it does, Linlithgow town and palace in the distance, with the Almond iron works smoking away in the foreground. From a rough calculation we should suppose there were between 2000 and 3000 spectators, including a goodly sprinkling of the gentry of the neighbourhood. Among the ladies and gentlemen present were - Col Stirling, of Tarduf, and Miss Stirling; T. S. M'Caul, Esq. of Haypark, and Lady; Miss Maxwell; Dr M'Farlane, Polmont; Archibald Gault, Esq., Grangemouth ; John Thomson, Esq., Carronflats ; John Hardy, Esq., Linlithgow; Thomas Gaff, Esq., Laurieston ; Mrs. and the Misses Gair, Kilns ; Thomas Kincaid, Esq. of Quarrybank, Greenock, and Miss Kincaid; Patrick Murdoch, Esq., Falkirk; Alex. Kincaid, Esq, Liverpool, and Lady; Mrs. and Misses M'Farlane, Muiravonside Manse; Allan Bell, Esq., Abbotshaugh, and Miss Sherriff; M. M. Henderson, Esq.; R. W. Dorward, Esq, &c. The Camelon Band was present, and discoursed a variety of pieces during the day, while the various competitions were being carried on. Much praise is due to them for the manner in which they performed their part. The committee also, and especially Mr. Daniel Binnie, secretary, deserve a word of praise for their indefatigable exertions to preserve order and harmony throughout the day. Mr. C. Denford of Shieldhill officiated as starter and umpire, to the satisfaction of every one present. In connection with the meeting, it has to be stated that the children attending the Parish School, under the care of Mr. Henderson, and the Female School, under the care of Miss Ross, numbering altogether 150, were kindly entertained by Mrs. Urquhart, in front of Vellore House. No accident that we are aware of occurred, except that an ale-cart driver's horse took fright, and upset nearly the whole of the contents of the cart; the beverage running down the "brae" in a clear stream, and affording a delightful draught to several "drouths'' who happened to be on the ground at the time. Subjoined is a list of the various competitions which were gone through, and which were all confined to the parish except the mile race, vaulting, and a hurdle race : -

Quoiting (6 competitors) 1st (£1), Wm. Morrison; 2nd (10s), John Bryson; 3rd (5s), Alexander Fleming. Several good ends were witnessed in this competition, which was carried on from 9 o'clock till about 1. Putting the 18 lb. ball (6 competitors) - 1st (10s), Robert Heaps; 2nd (5s), John Muirhead; 3rd (2s 6d), John Gow. The winner threw 30 ft 8 in.

300 Yards' Race (5 competitors) -1st (10s), Samuel Smith; 2nd (6s), Neil Forsyth; 3rd (4s), Richard Williams.

Running High Leap (5 competitors) - 1st (10s), Wm. Heaps; 2nd (6s), James Gray; 3rd (2s 6d), William Hardie, height of the winner's leap 4 ft. 4 in.

Throwing the 16 lb. hammer -1st (10s), John Muirhead; 2nd (6s), William Heaps; 3rd (4s), David Flint. The winner of the first prize threw 56 feet.

Vaulting with the Pole, confined to the parish (5 competitors) - 1st (10s), Wm. Heaps, 8ft. 1 in.; 2nd (6s), James White, 7ft. 9 in. ; 3d (4s), Thos. Rae, 7ft. 6 in.

Running Hop, Step, and Leap (6 competitors) - 1st (12s), Alex. Roberts, 36 ft. 8 in.; 2nd (8s 6d), James Wardrobe; 3rd (5s), Wm. Muir.

Tossing the Caber - 1st (10s), Neil Stevenson, 18 ft. 5in.  2nd (5s), Wm. Heaps; 3rd (2s 6d), Robert Heaps. Half Mile Race - 1st (£1 5s), Samuel Smith; 2nd (15s), Neil Forsyth; 3rd (7s 6d), Wm. Muir. Smith took the lead at the second round, was never overtaken, and won easily by several yards.

Vaulting with the Pole (open), (6 competitors) - 1st (15s), Anderson Turner, Salsbury, 9 ft ; 2d (10s), Wm. Heaps, 8 ft. 7 in.; 3d (5s), Wm. Bruce, Falkirk, 8 ft. 6 in.

Three-Legged Race (7 couples entered) 1st (10s), Gray and Heaps; 2nd (5s), White and Tod; 3rd (2s 6d), Muir and M'Luckie.

Boys' Race, under 5 feet (8 competitors) - 1st (6s), Wm. Meek; 2nd (4s), Henry Weir; 3rd (2s 6d), James Scobbie.

Boys' Race, under 4 1/2ft. (9 competitors) - 1st, (4s), Robert Monro; 2nd, (3s), John M'Lay; 3rd, (2s), John Bishop; 4th, (1s), James Conolly.

One Mile Race, open (3 competitors) 1st, (30s); 2nd, (15s) This was decidedly the "Derby" of the day. Turner, after playing with Lumsden of Bo'ness, and Samuel Smith, eventually shot ahead, and came in 20 yards before Lumsden, while Smith had to relinquish the contest before reaching the winning-post.

Sack Race (3 competitors) - 1st, (6s), James White; 2nd, (4s), Matthew Forsyth.

Hurdle Race, confined to the parish, (4 competitors) 1st, (10s), William Heaps; 2nd, (5s), Samuel Smith; 3rd. (2s 6d), Robert Forsyth.

Wheelbarrow Race (5 competitors) - 1st, (6s), Robert Nimmo; 2d, (4s), Peter Wilson; 3d, (2s), James Drysdale.

Hurdle Race (Open). - 1st (10s), Anderson Turner ; 2nd (5s), Alex. Lumsden; 3rd (2s 6d), William Bruce. This was substituted tor the donkey race, none of the above animals putting in an appearance.

A leg of mutton was also hoisted on a greasy pole for competition, but there were no entries.

 

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 25th July 1867

THE LINLITHGOW TALES. No. 6. - THE RESURRECTIONISTS.

At a period of between fifteen and twenty years ago I used to pay frequent visits to the ancient burgh of Linlithgow under circumstances which caused me then to regard that somewhat dingy, irregularly built town as the most interesting and romantic spot on the face of the whole earth. Part of my midsummer holidays were regularly spent there, for I was at the time attending classes in the Edinburgh University, and a great deal of my spare cash was absorbed by fares for running in and out by the new railway,which seemed truly the magic power able "to annihilate both time and space." We all know how foolish and sentimental young men become at a certain age, which some people call the poetical, and how silly they sometimes appear to onlookers and to their seniors who have already passed by that time in their lives.The fact is, that my present wile's father, an ex- baillie of the burgh, and one of the 27 gods of Linlithgow, shortly before abolished, was then living there, and I made all manner of excuses and took every possible opportunity for running out to see the young lady after having first met her at her brother's lodgings in the city, often to the serious interruptionand neglect of my studies. During my first year at college one of the professors - the Greek I think it was - took occasion to remark to the class that "a student should never, on any account, fall in love till the end of the session;" yet, the year following, I myself failed in passing a mathematical examination through the same infatuation. It was a saying of my father-in-law's, the bailie, that the difference between old men and young men was, that the young men thought the old ones were fools, but that the old men knew the young ones to be so. Like all old men who have had a great deal of experience in the practical affairs of life, the bailie was fond of enlarging upon the great inferiority in stamina of the rising generation around him, compared with the youth of a by-gone age when he was a young man, notwithstanding all their newfangled notions and appliances. He would tell me that I hardly knew I was born, and, on one occasion, when I quoted the passage in the 2d Book of the Odyssy, 1. 245, which may be thus rendered, "few children grow up equal to their sires, but most of them inferior, although a few are found to surpass them," he was pleased to allow that learning Greek might not be quite useless after all. My wife was an only daughter, and had lost her mother many years before we became acquainted. She was not esteemed remarkably good-looking, yet "there is no accounting for taste," as the man said when he kissed his cow. At any rate, I thought, and still think, her both good and clever, and in those days would have done anything in the world to get possession of her. Most of my courting had to be done by coups d'aeil, or by short snatches during walk, or wandering among the ruins of the old Palace, where, under pretence of a strong antiquarian interest, I often persuaded the old gentleman and her to accompany me. Through being acquainted with Miss M'C----, the lady to whose care it was formerly entrusted, he was always able to obtain a ready access to that venerable pile of deserted yet still impressive grandour. The repairs which it has undergone, and the removal of the dirt and rubbish which had accumulated in every corner, have, since it was taken possession of by the Government and put under the care of a regular keeper, greatly enhanced the safety and pleasure with which an hour may be spent in rambling through its innumerable passages, staircases, and halls; nevertheless, it was as charming and full of interest to me when I first knew it as the fairy palace of Aladdin to the Arabian Nights. The venerable Baillie, who was too shortwinded for such efforts, remained below in the quadrangle, while we climbed the stairs and walked along the parapets and tops of the walls together, discussing our music, poetry, novels, acquaintances, and other subjects of mutual interest, until he became impatient and called us down again. At length, much to my chagrin, this manoeuvre was discovered, and put a stop to. When I ventured to hint matrimony he fairly laughed me out of countenance, and told me that she would be too young for five or six years to come, although when I once told her that she was "only a wee lassie," she got angry, boxed my ears smartly, and replied that I was "just a big laddie" myself. When I offered to run away with her, and go into a Government situation, to which I had a claim, she had sense enough to put me off until the end of my carriculum. This went on for three or four years, however, and I had to spend, or, as I thought, waste, many an evening over the toddy telling stories and listening to his recollections of old Linlithgow. What I remember of his sayings and observations cause me to entertain a great respect for his memory, and lead me to believe that he was a man of most remarkable shrewdness and common sense. In this way I became acquainted with the characters and histories of many of the natives of Linlithgow, and was told everything remarkable that had taken place in the town for the last half century. Most of these particulars have now faded from my memory, although it will not be difficult to recall them if some day I can find time to compare notes with two or three of the oldest inhabitants who must have taken an active part in them. The following incidents referring to the days of the resurrectionists, being more in my way as a doctor, made a somewhat deeper impression, although the reader must make some allowance for discrepancies, seeing that they are all taken down from hearsay. Linlithgow and the towns and villages in its neighbourhood, no doubt owing to their position upon the Edinburgh and Glasgow road, were often exposed to the visits of the body-snatchers or resurrectionists, who opened the new made graves, and carried off the occupants for the use of the doctors, lecturers on anatomy, and medical men of all descriptions in the city, among whom there was always a large and continued demand for that commodity. My mind has never been altogether made up as to the reprehensibility of such a traffic, and it has always to me appeared a most sensible proceeding on the part of the man who, having been afflicted in life with an unusual and complicated disorder, specified expressly in his will that his body should be given over after death to the doctors to dissect for the advancement of science, and the benefit of his fellow creatures. Without doubt, exceedingly disagreeable to the personal friends of the deceased, it has yet supplied to Barclay, Liston, and other of our great anatomists, the means of founding in Edinburgh one of the finest modern schools of medicine, and just as there is but a step between the sublime and the ridiculous, so there is often a still smaller remove between man's greatest glory and his shame. Taking into consideration that a student of medicine or surgery has to go through the whole body two or three times, piece by piece, and fibre by fibre, until he is able to recognise and name every joint, suture, muscle, sinew, vein, artery, nerve, &c, why should the useless dead body be grudged which is employed solely to aid in preserving the living. The inhabitants of Linlithgow were troubled with no such compunctions, however, as the sequel will shew. The older half of them quite well remember having to take their turn in watching to keep away the bodysnatchers up at the church-yard, for the practice was kept up for many years, and every householder had to go himself or find a substitute, which came round once or twice a year. The watch-house, provided for that purpose, stood about the centre of the south side of the church-yard between the grave stones of Robert Aitken and George Hendry. The first body known to have been lifted from there was that of Benjamin Jamieson or Davidson, which was tracked over the soft ground of the Peel to the Duke's entry, at that time still open, and where there was most likely a conveyance in waiting to carry it off to Edinburgh. At another time, two brothers by the name of Henderson, when hoeing potatoes in a field at the east end of the town, came upon something buried in a sack which turned out to be a corpse. The same day, a man belonging to Linlithgow, happened to pass through Kirkliston, and saw a person with a horse and gig watering his animal at the inn. He informed him of the discovery of the body, and warned him not by any chance to stop or alight from his gig near to the place, for there was a party lying in wait who would "yoke on him, and maybe kill him afore he kent." Ere the sentence was completed, however, the fellow had turned his horse, and was driving off as hard as possible back towards Edinburgh. One week day evening also when two persons, still living and well-known in Linlithgow, were standing at the door of the Morrisonian Chapel, about to enter in order to attend a meeting, one of them observed a gig, containing apparently three persons, driving rapidly round the back of the town. The centre figure of the three was muffled up in a great coat and cravat, but had such a pale face and such a stony stare in its eyes, that there was no mistaking it for a corpse, which the other two had bolstered up between them. Before the alarm was raised they were far away in the distance. For a long time corpse-lifting was carried on so cleverly that there was believed to be a traitor within the camp, well acquainted with all the burials which occurred, until at last one M'Leod, the town piper, was caught with a spade under suspicious circumstances, and first mobbed in his own house, and then driven from the town, when the depredations ceased. Linlithgow was not the only place which was annoyed and terrified in this manner. At Muiravonside, where the canal when in making cut off a corner of the lonely churchyard, the boatmen were in the habit of raising the bodies before they were twenty-four hours in the ground; sometimes having the audacity to ring the church bell, the rope of which hung on the outside; and before the people of the parish could collect and learn what was wrong the rascals were well on the way to Edinburgh with their barges. A story is told of a man, belonging to Torphichen, who had emigrated in his youth, and returned in afterlife to his native village to pay his friends a visit. He found them all either scattered or dead and buried, and went up to the churchyard to see the grave of one said to be therein buried. Before long a woman espied him from her cottage door, and took him for a body-snatcher taking stock for a midnight robbery. "Awa ye get out o' that," cried she, "y'ell get naething here. Awa ye gae doun tae Lithgo', their no sae strick there noo;" and her cries having turned out the villagers in a body, he had to run pretty smartly to escape violence. ‘Didn’t I see him," said the woman to her neighbours after he was gone, "didn't I see him sittin' on Johnny Nicol's grave, plannin' hoo a' he would dae tae get him up i' the night time."Many more such stories the Baillie was able to relate. For the present we will content ourselves with a single addition. About seven o'clock one evening during the month of July or August in the year 1822, while my friend was seated in his office, he was disturbed by a great noise in the street, which, on going out, he found to be caused by the capture of a body-snatcher, along with a gig full of corpses. The particulars of the seizure, as he related them, are pretty nearly as follows - That afternoon a herd boy, while quietly seated in a held by the main road near to Polmont, had observed two men drive up with a horse and gig and pull out three dead bodies from a large midden heap, where they had previously hidden them. He immediately ran up to the farm-house, three-quarters of a mile distant, and told his master, Mr. Scott of Gilston, what had taken place. Mr. Scott was a man of energy and spirit, and to mount his pony and start in the pursuit was the work of an instant. He rode with neither stirrups nor spurs on a saddle which was commonly used in those days called sunks ,and he kept his pony going at full speed by probing him continually behind with a long nail or spike held in his right hand. My goodfather, who quite well remembered his appearance when he entered the town that evening, said that he wore knee breeches, long stockings and shoes. He spoke, too, with a very strong burr, so that when he first overtook them and began to cry out at Linlithgow Bridge, " Crrrpse in the; gig, crrpse in the gig, crrpse, crrpse," as they drove furiously past, pursuing and pursued, no one could make out what he said, or what was the cause of the outcry. On reaching Linlithgow, one of the men jumped out of the gig and escaped down the Bo'ness road, while the other drove straight on. At last, a young man, by the name of Douglas, son of a character well known over all the country side as the Duke o' Douglas, who knew Mr. Scott, and heard him shouting "Crrpse in the gig, crrpse, crrpse," ran forward and seized the horse's head to stop the machine, and find out what was the matter. The driver tried to force his way past, but one Hugh Christie went to assist, and they came to a stand still a little to the west of the shop now occupied by Mr. Oliphant, baker. The driver then jumped out, and ran for his life. As soon as Mr. Scott came up and explained what was wrong, part of the crowd which collected gave chase, and part remained to find out what was in the gig. Both the apron and the curtain which covered the opening of the box below were whipped off and sent flying, exposing to view three human bodies, which lay underneath, without the slightest further covering. Each one was doubled up and tied together by a string drawn round its neck and under its knees. One was that of a young woman, about sixteen, and another of a young man of twenty, which one of the onlookers recognised, notwithstanding its sunken eyes, as that of an old school-fellow, named John Brown, son of Wm. Brown, farmer at Ochiltree Castle, and buried in the Parish Churchyard of Larbert six weeks previously. The third was of a man unknown. After being untied and lifted out on to the road, they were carried slowly and carefully up to the Town House. The sight of the corpses had meanwhile roused the fury of the mob to the very highest pitch. They hunted the driver of the gig out of every corner in which he attempted to take shelter. Having fled to the shop of Mr. Alexander Baird, or Sanders Baird, as my informant called him, he was quickly thrust forth again, leaving his whip in the hand of the latter, who long afterwards showed it as a relic. The very excess of rage on the part of the people alone saved the fellow from having his brains dashed out, for in their eagerness to strike the one pulled back the other, and hindered them from getting a blow. It ended in his being locked up for the night in the common prison. The anger of the populace was then directed against the gig. Obtaining hammers from a neighbouring smithy, they took off the wheels, knocked them to pieces, them carried them down the vennel, and threw them into the loch. Afterwards the body of the gig was dragged along the town, occasional halts being made to afford them an opportunity of having another smash at it. A stout young sawyer, who got hold of one of the shafts, declared it to be as tough a piece of wood as was ever put in a carriage, "the real hickory," for it bent back to the very axle before it broke. Many carried away the pieces in order to serve as trophies. Last of all, a cry was raised to kill the horse, to prevent identification, and save the town from the consequences of their night's proceedings, although this foolish proposal was not carried into execution. All three bodies were eventually claimed by the friends and carried back to Larbert, where they had been originally buried. A subscription was soon after raised for the purpose of presenting Mr. Scott of Gilston with a testimonial in acknowledgment of the services rendered on this occasion, which was in the form of a silver snuff-box, valued at over five pounds, towards which my friend, the Baillie, contributed the, for him, munificent sum of five shillings. A further instalment of these reminiscences has been deferred to a future opportunity.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 1st August 1867

Situations

PECENTOR WANTED for the U.P. CHURCH, AVONBRIDGE. Salary, £5. Applications to be lodged with MR. ANDREW JARDINE, as early as possible.

Avonbridge, 26th July, 1867.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 8th August 1867

COUNTY OF STIRLING.

REGISTRATION OF VOTERS COURT.

INTIMATION IS HEREBY MADE, That the SHERIFF of the COUNTY of STIRLING has given Notice, in terms of the Acts 2d and 3d William IV., chap. 65, 19th and 20th Victoria, chap. 58, and 24th and 25th Victoria, chap. 83, that on the days, and at the places after specified, he will HOLD OPEN COURTS, for the purpose of REVISING and CORRECTING THE REGISTER of VOTERS for the COUNTY of STIRLING, and deciding on the merits of all Claims for Registration, within the same, Objections to these Claims, and Objections to Persons continuing on the Roll of Voters, viz. : -

FALKIRK - and within the SHERIFF COURT HOUSE there, on FRIDAY the 20th September next, at 12 o'clock Noon, for the Parishes of Parishes of FALKIRK- So far as not comprehended in the Burgh of FALKIRK

AIRTH,

LARBERT

BOTHKENNAR,

POLMONT

MUIRAVONSIDE and

SLAMANNAN

THOMAS L. GALBRAITH,

Sheriff-Clerk

Sheriff-Clerk's Office,

Stirling, 7th August, 1867.

 

Falkirk Herald 8th August 1867

SHERIFF COURT. –

At this Court yesterday- Sheriff Bell on the bench - a man named William Cunningham, from Broadhead, near Redding, was brought up charged with committing a breach of the public peace at Maddiston on Monday last.  He pled guilty, and was fined in the sum of 30s, with alternative of 30 days' imprisonment with hard labour.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 15th 22nd August 1867

Mr. NEILSON'S SALES - Continued.

50 ACRES OF OATS AT MUIRAVONSIDE,

On SATURDAY, 31st AUGUST. MR. JAMES NEILSON begs to announce that he will Sell by Public Roup, on Saturday the 31st August, 1867, on the Estate of Muiravonside, belonging to Charles Stirling, Esquire, 50 ACRES OF SPLENDID HEAVY OATS, On the Old Pasture Lands of DRUMBOWIE, and SEATREES.

Four months' credit.

Roup to begin at Drumbowie, at One o'clock.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 29th August 12th September 1867

SALE OF POTATOES AND HAY,

AT KNOWHEAD, NEAR AVONBRIDGE,

ON SATURDAY THE 15TH SEPTEMBER

TO be Sold by Public Roup, on the Farm of Knowhead, near Avonbridge, possessed by Mr. Robertson, on SATURDAY the 15th September, 1867

6 Acres of POTATOES

1000 Stones of HAY.

The Potatoes is a heavy Crop, and the Hay is very fine quality.

Sale to begin with the Hay at half-past Five o’clock, and the Potatoes at Six o’clock.

DAVID NICOL, Auctioneer.

 

Stirling Observer 17th October 1867

LIST OF APPLICATIONS for CERTIFICATES for the SALE OF EXCISABLE LIQUORS for the COUNTY of STIRLING, for NEW PREMISES, by NEW TENANTS or OCCUPANTS, and for RENEWAL of TRANSFERRED

CERTIFICATES

Name Designation and            Place and Parish of County of Premises.           Class of Certificate    Name and Address of Landlord

Residence of Applicant                       Place.                Parish.                                       applied for               or Factor of Premises.

                                                                   FOR RENEWAL OF TRANSFERRED CERTIFICATES

Margaret Rankine, Publican,      Maddiston,     Muiravonside,                             Public House                         Robert Robertson,

Relict of Charles Rankine                                                                                                                                         Farmer,Netherton                                            

Maddiston, Maddiston                                                                                                                                                      Proprietor                                                                      

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 22nd August 1867

ANNUAL SALE.

HAY, POTATOES, AND TURNIPS, AT GREENWELLS, ON THURSDAY, 29th AUGUST.

MR. JAMES NEILSON will Sell by Public Roup, on Thursday the 29th August, 1867, on the Farm of Greenwells, possessed by Mr. William Neilson, 2000 STONES of RYEGRASS and CLOVER HAY, in Ricks; and 4 ACRES of POTATOES and TURNIPS. CREDIT AS FORMERLY.

Roup to begin with the Hay at Half past Five o'clock.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 26th  August 1867

AVONBRIDGE

TOTAL ABSTINANCE SOCIETY

During the last week, two temperance meetings have been held here, under the auspices of the above society, in the Evangelical Union Chapel, kindly donated by the managers of the church, and both have proved very successful. On Monday night, 16th inst., the Rev. A. Gray, E.U. minister, Kilsyth, was the speaker. Mr. D. Ballie, occupied the chair, and briefly traced the origin of the Society, and stated the object of the meeting. The lecturer then proceeded with his address, and clearly showed the need for total abstinence, and that it was the duty for all to become abstainers. On the motion of Mr. James Gray, a vote of thanks was accorded the lecturer for his impressive address, with a desire that he would visit us soon again; after which the meeting was closed by prayer. The second meeting was held on Thursday night, 19th inst., when Mr. Turnbull, one f the agents of the Scottish Temperance League, delivered on of those brilliant racy addresses for which he is so much and deservedly celebrated. Mr. D. Baillie again took the chair, introducing the speaker as an “old and tried worker in the cause.” It would be useless and impossible to enumerate all the good advices and facts which Mr. Turnbull gave forth, and it is almost needless to say that his lecture has been greatly appreciated; it is only to be regretted that the audience was not more numerous. We are certain when Mr. Turnbull again visits Avonbridge he will meet with a very warm reception. A heart vote of thanks was given to him at the close of his address. The chairman afterwards recited the temperance piece of poetry “The wee doug’s appeal to his druinken maister,” after which he received a vote of thanks on the motion of Mr. Russel, Stathavon. We believe it is the intention of the committee to hold a Soiree on an early date.

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 29th August 1867

DEATHS

STIRLING. - At Muiravonside House, Stirlingshire, on the 25th inst., Charles Stirling. Esq. of Muiravonside, son of the late Andrew Stirling, Esq. of Drumpellier, aged 77.

 

Falkirk Herald, Stirling Observer Thursday 29th August 1867

COUNTY OF STIRLING.

Valuation of lands & heritages, Statute 17 k 18 Vic, Cap. 91.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That the COMMISIONERS of SUPPLY of the COUNTY of STIRLING, will hold a COURT, upon the days, and at the places under-mentioned, for the purpose of hearing APPEALS against the Valuation made by the Assessor for the current year under the above - mentioned Statute, viz -At FALKIRK, upon Tuesday the 10th day of September next, within the COURT-HOUSE there, at Half-past 12 o'clock Noon, for Appeals from the Parishes of

AIRTH,

BOTHKENNAR,

FALKIRK,

MUIRAVONSIDE,

POLMONT,

SLAMANNAN.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 5th September 1867

DAY OF SALE ALTERED TO MONDAY 9th SEPTEMBER.

50 ACRES OF OATS AT MUIRAVONSIDE,

On SATURDAY, 31st AUGUST. MR. JAMES NEILSON begs to announce that he will Sell by Public Roup, on Saturday the 3lst August, 1867, on the Estate of Muiravonside, belonging to Charles Stirling, Esquire, 50 ACRES OF SPLENDID HEAVY OATS, On the Old Pasture Lands of Drumbowie, and Seatrees, four months' credit.

Roup to begin at Drumbowie, at One o'clock.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 12th September 1867

Mr. Nicol’s Sale

HAY AND POTATOES,

AT KNOWHEAD, AVONBRIDGE

ON FRIDAY, 13TH SEPTEMBER

To be Sold by Public Roup, on FRIDAY the 13th September, 1867, on the Farm of KNOWHEAD near Avonbridge, possessed by Mr. Robertson,

6 Acres of POTATOES, and

1000 Stones of HAY, in Ricks.

The Potatoes are this year, as usual, a heavy Crop, and the quality is fine; and the Hay is as good as any in the district, and is well got.

Sale to commence with the Hay at Half past Five, and the Potatoes at Six o’clock.

DAVID NICOL, Autioneer.

 

Stirling Observer 26th, Dunfermline Saturday Press Saturday 28th September 1867

STIRLING CIRCUIT COURT.

Tuesday, September 21. The Court sat at ten o'clock forenoon - the Lord Justice-Clerk and Lord Cowan on the bench.

The following were the principal eases brought forward: -

CULPABLE HOMICIDE AT BLACKBRAES COLLIERY.

Thomas Heeps, engineman, residing near Blackbraes, parish of Muiravonside, was charged with culpable homicide, in so far as on the 23d March last, he being then employed as engineman at Blackbraes Colliery, Muiravonside in the ocsupancy of James Russell & Son, ironmasters Falkirk, and while on duty as engineer at at No. 9 pit of said colliery, and in charge of the engine, he failed to supply the engine with water, and introduced water when the boiler was empty, in consequence of which the boiler burst, and the engine-house, boiler-seat, and other buildings were thrown down, and James Anderson, John Heeps, and William Heeps, who were at the head of the pit, were so severely burned and bruised that James Anderson and John and William Heeps, died on or about 25th March, and were thus culpably killed by the prisoner. The prisoner pleaded not guilty, and the case went to trial. Henry Aitken, manager of iron-work at Blackbraes Colliery, examined by the Advocate-Depute - The boiler used at the work was fixed - a good boiler, fitted up with all necessary machinery, the water being supplied from a pond. It was fitted with a steam-gauge and safety-valve. The float was about the middle of the boiler. Heeps was in charge of the engine on 23d March last on one shift. It is the duty of the engineman to see that a proper supply of water is upheld in the boiler. Rules are hung up near the engine-house, enjoining the engineer to have the engine in good working order, &c. On the evening of 23d March last, heard of the accident, and proceeded there. The boiler had burst in three pieces, which were blown to some distance. Considerable damage was done to the buildings. Was of opinion the boiler had burst from want of water, but had not seen a boiler burst before. Saw Heeps on Monday, and spoke to him about the accident. He said he could not account for it, and that he had water in the boiler before he went to his dinner at twelve o'clock. Said he had felt the float at half-past eleven in the morning for the first time, and I understood he had been looking for it previously. If the water went away from the gaugecock, he had no means of knowing where the water was. I think if he could not find the float he should have blown off the boiler. Heeps never complained to me of the apparatus about the boiler. By Mr GIFFORD, advocate- It is not my duty to inspect the machinery, but I do so occasionally - to see that all is going right. Have often viewed the engine since it was erected to see that it was in working order. There are engineers for the purpose of inspecting. Witness then described tbe working of the float. The engine itself feeds the boiler by working a pump, and if the water failed in the pond it was brought up from the pit. Examined the feed-pipe valves and gauge-cock after the explosion. Could not say whether they had been in good working order on seeing them after the explosion. Could not say whether the boiler was thinner where the explosion took place than at others. Had not a pair of callipers to measure the thickness, and could only judge by the eye. Possibly enough the water had disappeared before the explosion took place. By a Juror - Are you aware whether the boiler was insured ? It was not insured. George Mitchell, engineman, was on duty on 23d March on the night-shift. Asked Heeps at the foot of the road if the water was well up. He said it had been up a good bit, and that it would be up to the float when I went forward. I kept the feed-pump going on the boiler, and damped the fire to save what water I had. The boiler was not over-heated when I left it. Had kept the fire in a damp state during the night. Cannot say whether the water was completely up to the float when I left. It is the engineman's duty to see that there is plenty of water in the boiler and that the cocks are in good order. There were a float and two cocks on the boiler, but the cocks were choked up. Re-examined - Had been two years at the boiler. The distance between the cocks was about 5 inches. The lower cock would have shown the water below the floats. Did not examine the cocks on the Friday evening. Thought they would be completely choked up. Sometimes they are choked up by the sediment from the water. I kept the engine going. The feed-pipe was on, therefore, as we were getting water in. I considered it safe to continue working the engine. When I failed to get water from the pond, I went to James Chalmers, and he got it from the pit. Chalmers came at five o'clock in the morning, and I had to put on the engine to get up the "kist" of water. Chalmers had to go down to fill the "kist" below. He sent up water immediately. When Chalmers sent up water I put on the feed-pipe. This was between five and six o'clock. The feed-pipe was working when I left at eight o'clock, and there was water in the boiler. Chalmers had continued to send up water to seven o'clock. When I left, the pressure was 35 lb. on the steam-guage, but can't say what pressure was on the safety-valve. We could safely work it at 40 lb., and we were working it at 35. Hot water had escaped from the safety-valve for two days  previously. Did not complain to any one that the feedpipe was not in order. Heeps' house was from 300 to 400 yards from the boiler. By the Advocate-Depute - The feed-pipe was working quite well when I left. If anything goes wrong it is my duty to report it to the engineer, to have it put to rights. A number of practical engineers gave evidence as to the state of the boiler and plates, which showed that the explosion had taken place from overheating, occasioned by a want of water in the boiler - the plates presenting the appearance of having been red hot. The declaration of the prisoner was then read, which was to the effect that he had ascertained that he had a sufficient quantity of water that forenoon by means of the float, and also by the two gaugecocks. Evidence for the defence was then led. George Cant, engineer, Bo'ness, had been a boilermaker for thirty-five years. He was asked to visit the scene after the explosion. Was informed that the wheel of the float was broken; but he did not see it himself. But assuming the wheel to have been broken, it might not have been a good indicator. Did not approve of these cockguages, as they sometimes show the water to be up when it really was not. Witness examined the three valves of the feeding-pump, and found the first to be good, the second bad, and the third wretchedly bad. W. Hamilton, engineer, Glasgow, spoke as to the Insufficient state of the boiler. Had examined the guagecocks, and found them without handles. There should have been fixed handles. The valves seem to have been much worn before the explosion. The Advocate-Depute addressed the jury, and having gone over the evidence, claimed a verdict of guilty. Mr. Gifford spoke for the defence. The jury returned a verdict of Not Guilty, and the prisoner was discharged from the bar. The result of the trial was received with some applause.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 10th October 1867

MUIRAVONSIDE.

Presentation. - The female pupils attending the Parish School of Muiravonside, on Tuesday, lst Oct., presented Miss Henderson, sister of Mr. Henderson, the parish teacher, with a handsome work table in token of their appreciation of her kindness in teaching them sewing, knitting, and other branches of ladies' work. There is no female teacher attached to the school, and Miss Henderson's services have been given quite gratuitously.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 17th October 1867

STACKS, HAY, HORSE, MILCH COWS, QUEYS, 30 SHETLAND CATTLE, PIGS, FARM IMPLEMENTS, CARRIAGES, TURNIPS, &c, AT MUIRAVONSIDE OFFICES.

MR. JAMES NEILSON begs to announce that he will Sell by Public Roup, as above, on Tuesday the 12th November.

Particulars Next Week.

WANTED, TEACHER for AVONBRIDGE SCHOOL. – Apply to – MR. WALTER GOWANS, Strath House, Avonbridge, Falkirk.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 24th 31st October, 7th November 1867

STACKS, HAY, HORSES, MILCH COWS, QUEYS, SHETLAND CATTLE, PIGS, FARM IMPLEMENTS, CARRIAGES, TURNIPS, &c, AT MUIRAVONSIDE OFFICES, On TUESDAY, 12th NOVEMBER. MR JAMES NEILSON begs to announce that he will Sell by Public Roup, on Tuesday the 12th November, 1867, the whole STOCK of CATTLE, MILCH COWS, HORSES, PIGS, and FARMING IMPLEMENTS, &c, at the Home Farm of MUIRAVONSIDE, which belonged to tbe late Charles Stirling, Esquire, comprising :-

14 Stacks of Famous Oats,

2 Stacks of Barley,

2 Stacks of Beans,

1800 Stones of Ryegrass and Clover Hay in 3 Ricks,

2 Draught Clydesdale Horses,

8 Pure bred Ayrshire Milch Cows and Queys, 7 in Calf,

1 Fat Cow,

30 Shetland Cattle ready for being fed off or Wintering,

7 Fine Berkshire Pigs, 3 Fat,

1 Very handsome Clarence Carriage, quite new,

1 Small Chariot,

3 Close-bodied Carts, with wheels and axles,

1 Cart, with broad wheels,

1 Stone Cart,

1 Liquid Manure Cart, with broad wheels,

2 Iron Lea and Stubble Ploughs,

2 Ransom's Subsoil Ploughs,

1 Four-horse Plough,

1 Double-moulded Drilling Plough,

2 Drill Scraping Ploughs,

1 Iron Clod Crusher, by Crosskill,

2 Land Rollers,

1 Double Sowing Turnip Machine,

1 Bean Sowing Barrow,

2 Turnip Slicing Machines,

1 Linseed Bruiser,

 1 Patent Live-Cattle Weighing Machine,

1 Cast-iron Land Grubber,

2 Pairs of Iron Angled Grain Harrows,

1 Pair of Grass-seed Harrows,and 1 Pair of Drill Harrows,

Horse Harness,

1 Pair of Barn Fanners,

With the Whole of the other Farming Implements and Utensils, Dairy Dishes, Cattle Tubs, &c, &c, &c. Also,

15 Eighteen Gallon Casks, and 2 Thirtysix Gallon Do.;

a few heavy Trees of Fir and Hardwood, and a quantity of Burn Wood;

7 Windows, with Frames and Shutters.

Likewise,

 SIX ACRES OF SPLENDID SWEDISH AND YELLOW TURNIPS,

AND ABOUT 5 TONS of FINE TABLE POTATOES.

three months' credit on APPROVED bills.

Roup to begin at Eleven o'clock.

 

Falkirk Herald 31st October 1867

SHERIFF COURT. –

At this Court yesterday- Sheriff Bell on the bench -

Peter Taylor and Wm. Gartshore were brought up charged with assault and breach of the public peace at Maddiston, on Saturday last. They pled guilty, and were each fined in the sum of 20s, or be imprisoned for twenty days

 

Stirling Observer Thursday 21st November 1867

ASSESSED TAXES - 1867-8.

APPEAL COURTS - COUNTY OF STIRLING.

THE COMMISSIONERS of SUPPLY for the several DISTRICTS of the COUNTY of STIRLING MEET, on the Days and at the Places undermentioned, to hear and determine APPEALS against charges made by the Surveyor for the current year : -

For the BURGH and PARISH of FALKIRK, and for the PARISHES of AIRTH, BOTHKENNAR, LARBERT, MUIRAVONSIDE, POLMONT, and SLAMANNAN - in the Red Lion Hotel, Falkirk, on THURSDAY the 28th day of November current, at Twelve o'Clock Noon.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 21st November 1867

Parliamentary Notice

BRITISH RAILWAY (FORTH RIVER RAILWAY.)

(NEW RAILWAY OVER THE FORTH AT ALLOA AND ABANDONMENT OF PART OF AUTHORISED RAILWAY OVER THE FORTH, AND OF OTHER WORKS; ALTERATION OF SLAMANNAN JUNCTION RAILWAY; EXTENSION OF TIME FOR COMPLETION OF WORKS NOT ABANDONED AND FOR COMPULSORY PURCHASE OF LANDS ; SEPARATE UNDERTAKINGS; AMENDMENT OF ACTS.)

Second, A Railway with Embankment and other works to be substituted for the viaduct which carries the Slamannan Junction Branch Railway of the Company over the Manuel Burn, in the parish of Muiravonside and county of Stirling, to be wholly situated in the said parish and county, commencing at a point on said branch one hundred and twenty yards, or thereby, from the centre of the said burn where it is crossed by the said viaduct, measured in a northerly direction along the line of said branch, and terminating on the said branch at a point fifty - three yards, or thereby, measured along the same in a southerly direction from the said centre of such burn. And it is proposed by the intended Act to take powers of lateral and vertical deviation from the line and levels of the proposed woiks as shown on the plan and section hereinafter referred to, within the limits usually authorised by Parliament, or to be prescribed by the intended Act; also for the compulsory purchase of lands and houses in the several parishes and places aforesaid, for the purposes of the said intended new works, and to purchase lands and buildings by agreement, and to stop up, alter, or divert temporarily or permanently all turnpike or other roads and highways, railways, tramways, rivers, streams, waters, watercourses natural or artificial, pipes, sewers, and works of every description which it may be necessary or convenient to stop up, alter, or divert for any of the purposes of the intended Act, and to alter existing tolls, rates, duties, and charges, and to authorise the levying of new or other tolls," rates, duties, and charges, and to confer, vary, or extinguish exemptions from payment of tolls, rates, duties, or charges :

 

 

 

Glasgow Herald Friday 22nd November 1867

WANTED, Teacher for a Country School. Salary from this to August, £8, with free house and fire. – Apply immediately, R. Jarvie, Dykehead, Avonbridge, Falkirk.

 

1868

 

Glasgow Herald 21st February 1868

At South Brae Cottage, Maddiston, by Linlithgow, on the 11th instant, Mrs. John Alexander Baillie; a daughter.

 

Glasgow Herald Saturday 18th April 1868

IRONSTONE AND COAL, IN SLAMANNAN AND MUIRAVONSIDE PARISHES TO BE LET,

Together or Separately, TO BE LET, Various SEAMS of COAL, in the Lands of High and Low Boxton, and In Balmitchel -- In all about 270 Acres; and the IRONSTONE In North Bankhead, about 64 Acres. The Slamannan Railway passes through Balmitchel, and direct access thereto can be given from the other Lands.

John Colquoun, Overseer at Balquatson, by Slamannan, has the Plan, and will point out the Fields; and Offers for the whole or any part may be made to Mr. James Webster, S.C.C7 Albany Street, Edinburgh.

 

Glasgow Herald Tuesday 3rd November 1868

OLIVER GOLDSMITH.

AN UNPUBLISHED INCIDENT IN HIS LIFE.

The Melbourne Argus of September 12 says:- Mr. Alexander Dick, of Drummond Street, Carlton, has sent us an account of an incident in Goldsmith’s life which is now published for the first time, and which, we are sure, will be read with much interest and pleasure.. This is not the first occasion on which additions have been made to the life histories of the illustrious dead from the traditions or records of Australian families, for some years ago an original anecdote of Dr. Johnston was discovered in a MS. Domestic memoir in Sydney; and published; and there have been some other similar cases.

The story runs "On his farm near Falkirk, and about the year 1750, my grandfather, William Dick, was caught by the press gang, and compelled to serve, in the regiment of Picardy. My grandmother, Mary Dalgleish or Douglass, joined him. The regiment passed to Ireland, and it was ordered on Foreign Service. Mary was debarred from accompanying her husband. They had three children - Adam, Willie (my father), and Jeannie. It was now 1752, and the children were seven, five, and three years of age. Mary resolved to return to Edinburgh. She had not travelled a fortnight when she was robbed, as she slept, of her money, her clothes and her children’s clothes. It was a lone house, and the people had no clothing to bestow. Mary and her children went forth in their night dresses. Desponding, despairing, she travelled on, but a ministering angel was at hand, and saved her. Oliver Goldsmith, on horseback, met her. No salutation passed. Willie and Jeannie were behind. Jeannie -now three years old-was ashamed of her dress, and to hide from the gentleman she got close to Willie. He pushed her into a ditch and ran. Goldsmith cried 'What sort of woman are you that you do not look better after your children?' Mary turned round and saw her daughter get to her feet quietly. Goldsmith drew near, and Mary replied, 'I am the wife of an impressed soldier on my way to Edinburgh; but last night I was robbed of our money and our clothes, and I am almost distracted. Goldsmith saw that she was an educated lady, end he begged pardon for the harsh manner in which he had spoken to her, and said, 'I am sorry that I cannot give you more than £1; but I won't leave you till I see you all better clothed. He turned back some miles. They came to a mansion, Goldsmith addressed the inmates, told them his name, begged clothes for his companions and said that he would return and pay for all that they could give. The inmates gave Mary decent material to make clothes for her herself and her children. Mary got to Muiravonside, but she did not go to Edinburgh. The friend that she had lodged with there had died. She was a widow that kept a small shop at, the foot of the Canongate. My grandfather's brothers had occasion to call on her successor. Goldsmith arrived in Edinburgh, and he called frequently at the shop to inquire after Mary's welfare. He was informed that William had been bought off for £4O, that he was working at Cathcart for 8d a day, that Mary was sewing and, the children knitting, and paying the money by installments. He sent them a few pounds. Honoured be the memory of Goldsmith. He said that it was the information that Mary gave him of Edinburgh College that made him make up his mind to come to it. Goldsmith set out on a, tour to the North and West Highlands, and to visit Mary at Cathcart; but his money failed him and he had to cut is tour short He expressed himself greatly disappointed that he had not seen Loch Lomond district, and that he had not seen Mary. He spoke constantly of taking another tour but he did not set out a second time.

 

1869

Glasgow Herald 29th Friday January 1869

FALKIRK CATTLE FAIR

The winter fair at Falkirk for the sale of cattle and horses took place yesterday, on the usual stance on the Callander Riggs. The forenoon was very wet, but at mid-day the weather cleared up, and warm sunshine followed. The attendance of dealers both in cattle and horses was larger than has been seen for many years at this market, while the show of stock was also in advance of last year. The cattle consisted of chiefly of calving cows of the Ayrshire breed, a few animals in milk, and a lot or two of queys; there were also some grass beasts. At this season of the year milch stock generally indicate a weakening tendency, and the result of yesterday’s proceedings formed no exception to the rule. Though there was evidently a number of people in search of stock the market opened stiff, and the dullness was not relieved as the day progressed. Besides the depressed state of trade, prices were down considerably from recent markets, and it was impossible to effect a clearance; indeed, one of the principal exposers failed to break bulk. For the best animals there was, of course, the best sale, and the reduction in the value of them was not so great as in the inferior descriptions. Mr. James Graham, Myothill, sold calving cows at from £10 to £14, and two-year-old queys £8 10s. Mr. Andrew Liddell, Denny, Purchased a lot of cows at prices ranging from £12 to £14. Mr. Gentleman, Falkirk, purchased calving cows at from £10 10s to £14. Mr. William Brock, Denny, sold calving cows at from £11 to £15. Mr. Crawford, Falkirk, sold calving cows at £9 10s, and grass beasts at £6. Mr. Henry Aitken, Avonbridge, sold calving cows at from £10 to £14.

HORSE MARKET

The show of horses was both larger and more excellent in quality than at any of the winter fairs in Falkirk for some years. The attendance of dealers was also large, and included Mr. Duncan, Aberdeenshire; Mr. McKinlay, Glasgow; Mr. Clark, Mearns; Mr. Christie, Stirling; Mr. Robert Rennie, Craigieburn; Mr. Yuill, Glasgow, &c. Mr. Rennie showed a capital stud of 20, which attracted a large amount of attention. He sold them at prices ranging from £20 to £46. Mr. Neilson, Gallowmuir, purchased a fine mare from him at £42. The trade was fair, and a considerable amount of business was done.

 

Aberdeen Journal Wednesday 30th June 1869

MUIRAVONSIDE ATHLETIC GAMES.-

Donald Dinnie attended these sports on Saturday, and though too late for the 22lb., ball competition, he gave one throw and sent it 39 feet or 4 feet over William Tait, who gained the first prize at 35 feet. Charles Mchardy was second at 31 feet 6 in. For throwing the 11lb. hammer, Donald Dinnie was first at 114 feet; William Tait, second at 87 feet 9 in., and Charles McHardy, third at 83 feet. For tossing the caber, Donald Dinnie was first, Charles McHardy second, and W. Tait Third. For wrestling, Donald Dinnie was first, C. McHardy second, and Samuel Muir third. Other feats, such as running, leaping, and tilting at the ring on horseback, were engaged in during the day.

 

Glasgow Herald Thursday 15th, Morning Post Saturday 17 July 1869

MARRIAGES.

At Jordanhill Renfrewshire, on the 14th instant, by the Rev. R. S. Oldham, William Stirling, Major, Royal Artillery, third son of the late Charles Stirling, Esq., of Muiravonside, to Anna Christian, daughter of the late William Stirling, Esq.

 

London Standard Friday 20th August 1869

MEDICAL APPOINTMENTS.

Dr. William Macfarlane, M.B. and CM. Glasgow, has been appointed medical officer for the parish of Muiravonside, Stirlingshire.

1870's

1870

Falkirk Herald 8th January 1870

MUIRAVONSIDE PLOUGHING MATCH. THE above MATCH will take place on the Lands of Toravon, near Maddiston, on Wednesday 12th January curt, (weather permitting).

Tickets to be drawn at Eight o'clock.

D. BINNIE, Secy.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 13th 15th January 1870

NOTICE.

ALL Persons having CLAIMS against the late Mr. DAVID BINNIE, Loan, Muiravonside, are requested to lodge the same with Mr. James Neilson, Auctioneer, Falkirk, within Fourteen Days of this date.

Falkirk, 13th January, 1870.

 

Falkirk Herald Saturday 15th January 1870

MUIRAVONSIDE PLOUGHING MATCH.

THE above MATCH having been put back in consequence of unsuitable weather, will now take place on Wednesday the 19th current, weather permitting; failing which, the first favourable Wednesday thereafter. 

D. BINNIE, Secy.

 

Falkirk Herald 20th 22nd January 1870

MUIRAVONSIDE.

The sixth annual competition in connection with the Muiravonside Ploughing Society took place yesterday on the lands of Toravon, possessed by Mr. John Binnie. The weather was everything that could be desired for such an occasion, and there was a good average attendance of competitors, twenty ploughs being on the ground. The judges were - Messrs Geo. Steel, Rashiehill; Archibald Ronald, Dorrator; and Wm. Learmonth, Upper Kinneil, whose task was rather a difficult one, in consequence of the general excellence of the work performed; and, after careful deliberation, they awarded the prizes as follows, their decision being received with general satisfaction, viz.: -

Seniors 1st prize, including Highland Society's Medal, Jas. Newton, with Messrs. J. & J. Dougal, Knowhead ; 2nd, Wm. Hodge, farmer, Boxton; 3rd, Wm. Hume, with Mr. Robertson, Maddiston ; 4th, Peter Stewart, with J. G. Urquhart, Esq. of Vellore ; 5th, Thomas Shanks, son of Mr. Shanks, Gillandersland ; 6th, Jas. Turner, Boxton ; 7th, Robert Meikle, son of Mr. Meikle, Candy.

Juniors - 1st, James Reid, with Mr. Binnie, Bowhouse ; 2nd, Campbell Cuthill, son of Mr. Cuthill, Coxhill; 3rd, Wm. Liddle, with Mr. Stevenson, Whiterigg.

After the match, the judges, committee, and a number of friends, to the number of about thirty, dined in the Athol Arms Inn, Maddiston, where an excellent dinner was supplied by Mr. Danford, the duties of chairman being ably discharged by Mr. Dougal, Knowhead- Mr. D. Binnie, secretary to the society, officiating as croupier.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 3rd February 1870

CURLING.

GRANGEMOUTH JUN. V. MUIRAVONSIDE. –

A match took place on Friday between these clubs on Callendar Loch, for a Royal Caledonian District Medal. In consequence of the thaw the ice was in extremely bad condition.

The following was the result of the game:

Grangemouth Jun.                           Muiravonside.

Mr. Laidlaw         17                          Mr. Forgie           8

Mr. Leisihman    16                          Mr. Young           11

Mr. Calder           16                          Mr. Robertson    11

Mr. Baird             16                          Mr. Lawrie          15

               65                                                        44

It will thus be seen the Grangemouth players won the medal by a majority of 21 shots.

 

Falkirk Herald 5th February 1870

CURLING.

SAUCHIE AND CANGLOUR V. MUIRAVONSIDE. –

A match took place on Saturday. 29th January, between these two clubs, for a Caledonian district medal, on the pond at Thackrigg, near Craigend, with two rinks aside. The ice was in excellent condition.

The following are the scores : -

Muiravonside.                                  Sauchie & Canglour.

Wm. Orr                             27           Wm. Drysdale                    3

Jas. Laurie                          15           Thos. Bulloch                     9

42                                                        12

 

Falkirk Herald 5th February 1870

JUSTICE OF PEACE COURT.

A Justice of Peace Court was held on Thursday last in the County Court Room, and presided over by Col. Stirling of Tarduff, Captain Urquhart of Vellore Castle, and John Wilson, Esq. of South Bantaskine.

REFUSING TO ADMIT THE POLICE.

Charles Danford, innkeeper, Maddiston, was indicted on a charge of having refused to admit the police to his hotel late on the evening of 25th December last, or early the following morning. The charge was denied and the case went to proof-Mr. Wilson, writer, conducting the defence. John Adam, police constable, Blackbraes, deponed - For some time past I have been on duty, by the instructions of the chief-constable, and on the 25th of December last I was in Maddiston, along with Constable Battison, about eleven o'clock. We patrolled to the south of Maddiston, and came back through that place about 12 o'clock. We had to pass Mr. Danford's hotel on the way coining back. When we were at his house it was 5 minutes past midnight. There was a light in the kitchen, and we heard people talking. Battison, the other constable, and I knocked at the door to be admitted, but we got no answer. We went to the window, knocked, and said we were police constables, but it had no effect. As soon as we said we were police constables, the light was put out, and the talking ceased. I distinctly heard Mr. and Mrs. Danford's voices, and several others, which I could not distinguish. 1 called Mr. Danford aloud, and I am certain the knocking could be heard in any part of the house. We stayed about 20 minutes altogether at Danford's. By Mr. Wilson - I knocked loudly both with my hands and with a stick at the door, and I knocked at the window with my hands. There was a shutter on the window, but I saw the light from the top and bottom, and at the sides. I don't know whether there is a bedroom in Mr. Danford's kitchen or not. There was no light in any other part of the house. There was a slight wind that night. Peter Battison, police constable, Polmont, corroborated the previous witness's statement, with the exception that Battison said he knocked with a stick both at the door and window. This concluded the case for the prosecution, and Mrs. Taylor was the first witness called for the defence. She deponed I live at Maddiston, next house to Mr. Danford. There is a close between his house and mine. I can distinctly hear any noise that is made at Danford's door or window during the night if I am not asleep. I have often heard people knocking with their hands at Danford's door. I remember last Christmas night I lay awake till nearly two o'clock in the morning, because I was expecting one of my sons to come home from Queensferry. I did not hear a noise that night at Danford's door or windows. I can distinctly hear people speaking outside when I am awake in bed. Wm. Taylor, son of the previous witness, deponed to having been at home on the night referred to, and of having heard no noise at Danford's house. Mr. Lewis Stirling, procurator fiscal, and Mr. Wilson then briefly addressed the bench, and after a long consultation, The presiding Magistrate (Col. Stirling) said that the court had had a good deal of trouble in coming to a decision upon the case. The evidence was very conflicting, but they had come to a conclusion that the panel must have heard the police at the window; but, under the circumstances, the court have agreed to make the sentence as lenient as possible, and they accordingly inflict the modified penalty of 5s without expenses, or to be imprisoned for 5 days.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 17th 19th February 1870

FALKIRK TOWN COUNCIL AND POLICE COMMISSION

THE GENTLEMAN FOUNTAIN

The PROVOST said that, in reference to this subject, he might explain that he had been in Glasgow about a month ago, and had the pleasure of seeing the casting of the fountain in the iron founder’s premises. It was a very elegant article, and it was beautifully got up. There had been a kind of granite stone discovered near Avonbridge, and Mr. Black was very anxious that this stone should be used for the erection instead of freestone. He expected the one stone would be as cheap as the other. The fountain was quite ready for them, but he had considered it better that, in consequence of the frosty weather, not to proceed with the erection just now, and he wrote the ironfounders to that effect, and they approved of this.

MR. ANDERSON said that he had seen the fount, and he must say it was a creditable piece of work. He would suggest that they delay putting up the fountain for a month or so yet, as the work would be better finished after the wintry weather was over.

MR. HILL expressed his approval of the stone being used for the work which had been discovered near Avonbridge.

After some further remarks it was agreed to delay erecting of the fountain for a month or two; and as to the stone to be used, Mr. Black was to be consulted on that point.

RAILWAY ACCIDENT NEAR LINLITHGOW. –

On Tuesday afternoon, a surfaceman who had been engaged shunting trucks at Manuel Station, near Linlithgow, slipped his foot, and fell on the rails, the wheelws of the trucks passing over him. The unfortunate man was conveyed to the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary in the evening, where it was found necessary to amputate one of his legs and the heel of the other.

SHERIFF SUMMARY COURT. –

At this Court on Monday -  Sheriff  Bell on the bench – Robert Lauchlin, vagrant, for assault and breach of the peace at Avonbridge on Saturday night, 20s or 20 days.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 19th 24th February 1870

To Let

ROUP of FIELDS, both for Pasture and Cropping on Lands of North Bankhead, Muiravonside Parish, will take place on Wednesday next, the 2ndMarch, at 12 o'clock, on the ground.

The Fields will be Let in separate lots.

GRASS PARKS, HAY & OAT STRAW

AT AVONBRIDGE,

ON SATURDAY, 26TH FEBRUARY, 1870.

MR. JAMES EASTON has been instructed by Mr. John Marshall to Let, by Public Roup, at  AVONBRIDGE, on SATURDAY, 26TH February, 1870, the following Excellent PASTURE, consisting of

THREE ECLOSURES,

To be Let for this season’s Grazing;

ALSO,

1 FIELD, for Cutting First Crop only; and

400 STONES HAY

300 Do. OAT STRAW.

Sale to commence at One o’clock.                               

 

Falkirk Herald 26th February, 3rd 5th March 1870

Mr. NEILSON'S SALES.

MUIRAVONSIDE GRASS PARKS,

On WEDNESDAY, 9th MARCH. MR. JAMES NEILSON will Let by Public Roup, on the Estate of Muiravonside, on Wednesday the 9th March, 1870,

THE GRASS PARKS On the Lands of Drumbowie, Seatrees, and Muiravonside Haugh; also the POLICY PARKS Near the Mansion House, and the GRASS in the Woods.

In all, 17 ENCLOSURES.

Roup to begin with the Parks at Drumbowie at 1 o'clock.

 

Falkirk Herald 5th 17th 19th March 1870

MANUEL GRASS PARKS.

TO be Let, for Pasture, for the ensuing Season, on Tuesday the 22d of March,

SIX GRASS PARKS, On the Property of Manuel, in the Parish of Muiravonside. The Parks are of various sizes, and are all good Grass.

Roup to begin at Entryhead at 12 o'clock Noon.

Mr. JAMES NEILSON, Auctioneer.

March 1870.

 

Falkirk Herald Saturday 19th March 1870

THE COCK O' THE STEEPLE TO THE BAIRNS O' FALKIRK. ODDS AND EN'S.

Curling - An Adventurous Votage - Ploughing . Matches, &c.

An auld freen o' mine in Grangemouth ance had a famous starling that could yatter and crack as guid as ony parrot in the kintry. He had taen great pains wi' its edication, and the result was that it could tell the guidwife to "mak a cup o' tea," speer "what o'clock is it?" "does ye're mither know you're out?" &c, in the usual gutteral utterances peculiar to sic beasties. The cage in which it capered hung on the wa' opposite the street door, and when ony freen or acquaintance cam in the bird wad watch every movement o' the intruder first wi' the ae e'e, and syne wi' the ither, and listen as attentively to the crack as gin it kent every word that was said. Among the daily visitors to Willies domicile was a neebor gossip o' the female sex, whose usual salutation on entering was, "Hech, bodies, hoo are ye a' the day ?" This she had repeated times without number in the coorse o' her visitations, till, without ony ane kenning o't, the starling pick'd it up and pooched it as a sort o' reserve, dootless, to its slender stock o' information. Ae day the gossip referred to cam in at twal hoors to speer for the guidwife, but, won'erfu' to say, the usual salutation wasna forthcoming. The starling couldna understan' it ava. It sat as quiet as a moose wi' its clear glittering e'en fixed on the incomer for a minute or twa, syne it gaed an indignant chuck, chuck, and lap to the ither spar, and listened again. Then it happed back and sat wi' great patience till the wifie was taking her leave, when it screamed oot its secret, "Hech, bodies, hoo are ye a' the day?"

Wi' a slight alteration I echo the words o' the starling, and exclaim ”Hech, bairns, hoo are ye a' the day? Sin' I last had the pleasure o' addressing you, I've haen mony a cauld whirl, and mony a bitter blast to face: for, as ye ken, nae matter hoo bitter the skyte, I maun hae my face till't. Were my neb made o ordinary stuff, and had a drap till't, as many o' the bairns had to theirs in the cauld wather, it micht hae gat frozen up athegether, and brocht my crawing to an untimely en'; but, guid be thankit, I'm nane o ye're common gentry. Though the rain, and the win', and the snaw, and the hail batter aff me every ither day, a blink o' sunshine maks me as cheery and as fit to craw as ever. Besides, amid a' the wild nor easters that blew, there was aye something o' a heartheezing character gaun on amang the bairns, and in the contemplation o't, I forgat a' aboot the wather, tho' it was cauld as Greenland. There, for instance, was the curling bonspiels, which I view'd wi' great delicht, mair especially as the bairns aye cam aff victorious; and it's nae sma' credit to them that such should be the case, considering the metal that was opposed to them. Shairly the Provost and those who are alang wi' him, will noo push earnestly forward the scheme o' the new curling pond to a successful termination, ere anither winter caps the Ochils wi' a snawy bannet. Get a pond whar ye could hae a day's curling wi' a nicht's frost. King Frost's a fickle character noo a days, and he doesna aften bestow his favours on his votaries; but sma' as they are, they are worth the watching, for let me see the man, ance he has "redd the ice," that wadna travel fifty miles to enjoy the glorious game, and I'll show you a phenomenon that never was dreamt o' in a' the warld's history. Curling is truly a noble recreation, and ane that ought to be encouraged whenever opportunity occurs. Unfortunately, the opportunity doesna occur sic aften as ane wild like; but, as maitters stan', it has aften to be let slip for want o' the means to meet it, as it were, hauf way. The project referred to wad accomplish this in a great measure, and I houp, wi' a' my heart, that the Provost, wha, withoot flattery, is a keen and guid curler, will no let it dee oot, but will rather jog it alang till the wishes o his subjects, in this respect, are fairly consummated. While crawing blithely ower the victories o' the bairns during the past winter, I canna help gieing an extra "cockle leerie" for the curlers o' the Port. The Juniors won their first medal this winter on Callendar Loch, and every ane o' them were as prood as peacocks on a sunny day. Certie, they had some reason to be prood too, for its no every club in the proving that could send the curlers o' Muiravonside hame wi their fingers in their mooths. I think I see them yet as

” To sharp inwick wi' bitter skyte,

 And many a pat-lid braw,

They chappit oot afore the gairds,

And yerkit to the snaw:

Till water kelpie neath the ice

 In wonder heard the rattle,

And shook wi' dread, beneath the tread,

O' curling kings in battle.

There was Sandie Laidlaw, looking as grave and earnest as gin the fate o' nations depended on his single arm, while, a wee bit farther ower the ice, Stevedore Tam, wi' a face bleezing like a nor'-wast mune, was roaring like wud, as the stane he had just thrown cam' birring up the "howe." " Diuna meddle her - dinna meddle her! soop noo! soop! Guidsake, what are ye glowring at ? Can ye no soop? She his't, ha! ha! On she goes - crack, bang, crack - yin, twa, three, for Grangemouth;" and Tam and his associates perform'd an impromptu bull reel roun' the rings, wi their brooms whirling aloft in uproarious rejoicing. When the game terminated in their favour, the rejoicings were renewed after the approved manner of the Port, and a' the road hame the spiel was played ower and ower again fifty times at the very least. Before they pairted the miaist o' their ideas had gat sae muddled wi' pat-lids, weekes, hougs, cowes, and curling' stanes, that it wad hae puzzled a Greek philosophere, supposing he had studied the phraseology o' the roaring game, as to what they were cracking aboot. Joking aside, however, the Juniors won their first Caledonian richt gallantly; and as they hae noo broken the spell, the club that lowers their colours for the the neist ane will hae to pit its best fit foremost.

Whenever I begin to crack o' the Port and ony thing connected wi't, I could haver awa frae June to Janwar; I ken a' the bodies sae weel, and I admire their ways sae muckle that it's a doonricht pleasure to look back through memory's spy-glass and pick oot the green spots that dotted auld Sealock in life's faucht. Mony's the queer sicht I hae seen ower the taps o' the quid auld Earl's trees frae my eerie uphere, and mony a queer story I've heard - for mindye I've lugs as weel as een - frae the gallant auld tars wha, after shivering their timbers ower hauf the warld, had cam' to anchor at last in the vicinity o' Mitchell Laird's shop by the side o' Carron Water. Mony o' the tars referred to hae, alas! foundered and sunk for ever oot o' sicht, but it will be a lang time ere their kindly wather-beaten faces and curious yarns fade oot o' remembrance. I dinna mean to relate a their yarns at present; indeed, though I was ever so much inclined, it wad be impossible; as those of "Lord Pickaxe," wi' his adventures amaug the Mouries(Maories) wad fill a volume themselves. Maybe I'll gie ye some o' them at a future time. Meanwhile as I'm in the way o' odds an' en's, I'll tell ye ane that will show how fearlessly the tars of a bygane age could face " The stormy winds that blow." People noo-a-days aften express their admiration when they hear of some mushroom yacht that has crossed the Atlantic, forgetting for the maist pairt that the navigators on board hae tempted Providence purely for the sake o' popularity and a name. Should they succeed in reaching their destination they obtain what they bargained for in plenty, but should the muckle waves gobble them up, there's a guid deal o' sarve-them-richt thochts underlying, whatever sympathy may be expressed. Wi' the regular sea-going mariner the case is different. He is aften, by the force o' circumstances, obleeged to ship in crafts anything but seaworthy. He has nae popularity to win but he has breed to earn for the young mooths at hame, and he has produce to bring for the kintry at lairge. Gang he must, and nae ferlie in what kin' o' craft he ships, except it be by freens nearly interested, its only looked upon as a maitter o' coorse. In this way many an adventurous voyage has been made and gane by unrecorded, and yet had the details been placed alangside those of modern experience, belauded as they are, little wad be lost wi' the comparison. Mony years ago, ane o' the maist eminent firms o' timber merchants in Glasca, in commencing business, purchased a lichter named the Princess Royal. She was about 60 tons register, and for 40 years, perhaps, had done duty on the Forth and Clyde Canal. Ane can easily imagine the state she was in after the buffetings she had received amang the locks a' these years, but the firm were anxious to import their ain timber, sae they turned her into dock, caulked her auld sides, and rigged her oot like a sloop, and syne laid her on for guids and passengers at Port Dundas for Pictou, in Nova Scotia. Captain -------,o' Airth was appointed to the command, and Sandie Deas, o' Grangemouth, being enlisted as chief-officer, and four seamen afore the mast, completed the complement o' hands. Having shipped her cargo and one passenger, (a schulemaister), aff she started doon the Bowling Canal, ahint three o' the Bummer's best horses, amid the cheers o' the onlookers. Passing oot into the Clyde, a scowman coming up frae Greenock wi' his vessel, speir'd whar they were bound to, and on being answered Pictou, the man evidently thocht they were making a fule o' him, for on being asked whar he was bound to, he yell'd oot "Gibralter, and be hanged to ye, and aiblins I'll be there as sune as ye'll be at Pictou." Arrived at the Tail o' the Bank they caust anchor, and the Maister went ashore for the purpose o' shipping anither han'; he picked ane up at the Custom House, a tall dandy looking character, wha wanted to "call a keb" to tak doon his kist. The Maister, hooever, said there was nae use gaun te ony expense as he would carry the kist himsel' - an offer that knocked the conceit clean oot o' the dandy sailor, and made him glad to lug his kit to the quay on Shank's naigie. Neist morning they set sail, and in a few days they were dancing amang the waves o' the Western Ocean. It wud be needless to enter into the details o' their weary voyage; suffice to say they arrived safely at their destination, took in their cargo, and prepared to return. They found hooever, that the vessel, never very strong, was likely to gi'e way athegether - was, in fact, likely to burst open - and discharge the cargo, without aether winch or crowbar. Here was a dilemma, but the crew were equal to the occasion: they girt her roon' wi' airn chains like a raft o' timber, and aff they set for hame. In five weeks after they moored her in the canal basin, opposite the Zetland Hotel, amid the congratulations o' Sandie's auld cronies, wha, ere he left, assembled in Bummer Morrison's and solemnly drank his dregy, as they never expected to see him back. Thus terminated the first and last voyage o’ the "Princess Royal" across the Atlantic, and by its success laid the foundation o' the extensive timber trade o Messrs Baird & Brown of Glasca. Little was known ootside o'  the Port o' the adventure - for it was naething less- and it sune drapt oot o' memory athegether. It is worthy o' a place, even at this late hoor hooever, in the columns o' the Herald, and I'm shair the aeditor will no grudge the space to dae justice to the gallant - hearted sailors o the Port wha took pairt in it. As far as I ken, they're a lying quate and cauld noo, wi' the gowans waving ower their heids, aud the laverocks singing in the lift aboon their narrow beds. The end o the maister and mate was remarkably alike. The captain was fand dead in his bunk on board the "Princess" wi' his open Bible lying beside him; and auld Sandie, after attending a prayer meeting ae nicht in the Port, gaed hame in his usual health, and deed neist morning at four o clock. "His weary heed was laid at rest, His pilgrimage was duue." Honest auld Sandie Deas, never a man or woman in a' the Port will grudge ye're memory a kindly word Gentle in spirit and simple-minded as a bairn, ye sailed the still waters o' ye're later years till the great commander brocht ye into the peaceful haven o the gouden city, whar nae win's rave nor storms assail.

The thow had scarcely frichted John Frost awa, and a' his curling lieges wi' him, when a new pleasure unfaulded itsel, and killed the megrims that threatened to tak haud o' me. Aroon On every side, east wast, north, and sooth, the farmer bodies wauken'd into life, and in every ither field were trying their skill against ilk ither in turning over lea and stubble. It was a gran sight to see a score o' ploo's starting in the match o the Eastern District, the lads ahint them deck'd oot wi their Feein' Fairsday waistcoats, and looking as gin they were determined to uphaud the honour o their respective toons; and the horses afore them prancin grandly, wi' their polished graith and ribbon-decorated manes. There was nane o' ye're cairter "yine yite's" to be heard here. The lads simply said Bess this or "Rab" that, and at the signal the intelligent animals started as gently gin they kent the prize depended on their steadiness. Up the riggs they travel, mony an anxious e'e watching keenly the progress they are making. ''Steady, Tam, steady; I wonder what maks that all' mere o' his sae fractious," mutters an onlooker to himself as he watches his freen' up the field. "Od, Jock's making bonny wark," mutters anither onlooker; "end as ye've begun, and the medal's yours." Hauf way up the ploo's begin to tail aff, and ere an hoor gaes by they're scattered aboot in a' directions ; some are coming doon while ithers are gaun up, and the e'e begins to find it difficult to distinguish the ane it looks for in the ever-varying scene. By-and bye ane o' the ploo's finishes up, syne anither, and anither, till the match cam to a conclusion, and then the judges stap in to decide the fate o' the competitors. Carefully they scan a' the different points, mark the uncovered tufts, the broken heidlan', and the cleanest furr, and then, after an earnest consultation, they proclaim Jamie Ronald, o' Cauldhame, the champion o' the Eastern District o' Stirlingshire. Weel dune, Jamie; richt nobly ye hae earned the title, for there hasna been a match in which ye took pairt for years bask but ye've been there or thereaboot, and ye maun hae as mony medals and prizes kicking aboot Cauldhame noo as an Indian has scalps in his wig'am. Ye're a credit to ye're toon, and gin Maister Burns, the schulemaister, had been leeving, he wad hae been prood o' his auld scholar. May ye win mony a prize yet, ere the winter o' age unsteady ye're han', or disturbs the ettle o' ye're e'e. I was speaking o' Maister Burns, the schulemaister, and  was hauf intending to reca' some pleasing reminiscences o' his schule doon in Stark's park, but I'm ower late o' beginning this week, and I'll therefore defer them till my next communication.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 7th April 1870

SLAMANNAN

DISPLENISHING SALE AT DYKE FARM

On Saturday last, the whole of the stock on the farm of Dyke, near Slamannan, belonging to Mr. Scott, of Messrs Scott & Gilmour, coalmasters, was sold by public auction. The importance and extent of the sale drew together an unusually large attendance of farmers, graziers, and dealers in cattle from all the surrounding districts. Mr. D. Nicol, Falkirk, was the auctioneer, and from the beginning to the close of the sale he had an excellent company of bidders. The implements – all of modern make – were sold and fair value obtained. The stud of horses was next submitted to competition, and though they presented nothing extra as to quality or character there were plenty of customers, and the whole were without difficulty disposed of at high prices. Mr. Watt, Drumray, bought the best draught horse at £44 10s. Mr. R. Rennie, Craigburn, purchased a colt at £31 10s. Mr. Ralph Stark, Camelon, Purchased a very promising yearling at £16. The stock of cattle was all of the Ayrshire breed, and consisted of dairy cows, queys and bullocks, and a few lots of stirks and calves. Generally they were lean in condition, but nevertheless they fetched a higher value than they would have done in a public market. The dealers could not get a hand in, there being plenty of willing purchasers otherwise. The milch cows sold at from £8 15s to £15; three–year-old queys at from £7 to £11; three-year-old stots at £11; stirks at from £4 6s to £4 17s 6d; and calves at from 18s to 37s. Mr. Anderson, Croy, Mr. Wilson Avonbridge, and Mr. Robert Rennie, Craigieburn, were among the largest purchasers. The fields and cropping on the farm for this year were afterwards let, and for which there was a spirited competition.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 14th , 16th  April 1870

POLMONT.

PUBLIC DINNER. –

The dinner on the occasion of the marriage of Dr. Macfarlane with Miss Thomson, of Carronflats, was held on the evening of Tuesday in the hall. Captain Urquhart, of Vellore Castle, occupied the chair, supported on the right by ex-Provost Hardy, Linlithgow ; J. H. Melville, Esq. Kersehill ; Joseph Mackay, Esq., Grangemouth ; Archd. Melville, Esq., and on the left by Dr. Gilmour, Linlithgow ; Henry Baird, Esq., Abbotsgrange; John Watson, Esq., Mumrills ; Robert Aitken, Esq., Linlithgow ; Dr. Macnair, Falkirk ; Thomas Gaff, Esq., Laurieston; Andrew Reid, Esq., Haining; Peter Forgie, Esq.; Miller Wilson, Esq. George Forrest, Esq., and John McKinlay, Esq., acted as croupiers. After the company enjoying a sumptuous dinner, served by Mrs.Ballantyne of the Black Ball, and the usual loyal and patriotic toasts having given and duly responded to the Chairman rose and proposed the toast of the evening. He said:  - "The toast which I have the honour to propose is one which I feel sure I have only to name to you to induce you to receive it with acclamation - it is the health of the newly married couple. Sometime ago, when it came known that the Doctor was about to enter on a married life, it was mooted in the parish that some demonstration should be made to celebrate the event. A committee was formed, invitations issued, and I had the honour to be asked to fill this chair ; while around me I see the response to the call in so many coming here to show their goodwill and esteem for their district surgeon. It is only three short years since the Doctor came to Polmont, a very young man to embark in the great struggle of life. This meeting testifies, in language more powerful than any words of mine that he has not done so in vain. Few young men at his age have occupied such an enviable position. The son of a clergyman of some eminence in the denomination to which he belonged, he enjoyed the advantages of an excellent moral training, while his education was successfully carried out in the best of schools in England and Scotland. Well I remember his youthful face in Linlithgow Church several years ago when spending his vacation with relatives there. He was articled at an early age to a gentleman who is present this evening, from whence he proceeded to the University receiving honours in almost every class he attended. A few weeks after his graduating he settled in Polmont. Never shall I forget the day I was introduced to him by Mr. Forgie, when he asked me if I would only take him by the hand he was sure he would succeed. I thought at the time what could I do for him but I am very glad to say that with the assistance of some of you present this evening we have succeeded far above what we expected. My heart warming to the boy I had known years before, the friendship that day formed has not only remained unbroken, but been daily strengthened by many happy hours spent together. He has enjoyed many of my confidences, which I have always found him treat in the most gentlemanly way; while I have been the recipient of his joys and troubles. Gentlemen, I am aware that all of you are not his patients, while you are all his well-wishers, but I do not say too much that many and the most of you are. When that great enemy of life, disease, has entered your doors, many of you, have sought his services; and I am sure that his advice and help has always been given cheerfully and willingly. I am not, however, going to enlarge on his abilities as a professional man, or his attainments as a gentleman; for I believe that with these you are with myself equally acquainted. His career, in short, has been one of combined success. He is now medical officer to the parishes of Polmont and Muiravonside, while he enjoys the confidence of an extensive circle of patients, the friendship of very many families in the district, and I think I say not too much when I add the respect of all who know him. He is fast approaching the enviable position once held by a gentleman you all liked and loved, I mean the leading physician in Harrogate, Dr. Myrtle, whose only fault to Polmont was, that it was far 'ower' healthy. Dr. McFarlane, with all his success, still wanted a something to make it complete, and that was a wife. This at length has seen fit to take to himself. He has this day married one of the young ladies of the district. To say he has made a good choice is saying too little. Although, perhaps, little known in Polmont, her good name has come before her. Early placed in a responsible position by the loss of her mother, she has been even more than a mother to her brothers and sisters, while her amiable disposition has endeared her to all who have had the honour of acquaintance. She possesses all the good qualities necessary for a good doctor's wife, and I think the Doctor should congratulate himself upon his luck in getting such a gem. He has in truth 'wailled weel.' I am sure it will be gratifying to her to know that she comes to Polmont the wife of a man so much esteemed as this meeting shows. Dr. Macfarlane has been a good son and brother, and good sons make good husbands, while vice versa she has been a good sister and will make a good wife. Gentlemen, in asking you to pledge this toast in a full bumper, let us wish the young and happy couple long life, health, and prosperity. May their future career be as auspicious as the past augurs for them, and long may they go in and out amongst us." The toast was responded to with enthusiasm. After this came the under-mentioned toasts, interspersed with songs sung by members of the company, By Mr. Geo. Forrester, "Mrs. Macfarlane and Family," replied to by Ex-Provost Hardy; by Mr. M' Kinlay, “The Medical Profession and Dr Gilmour;" by Mr. Gaff, "The Groomsman and Mr. J. H. Melville ;" by Mr. Hardy, "Agricultural Interests and Mr. H. Baird;" by Mr. J. H. Melville, "Prosperity of Polmont Parish, replied to Mr. John Wilson, Nicolton ; by Mr. Henry Baird, Grange, "The Carronflats Family;" by Mr. Forrester, "The Chairman;" by Mr. Watson, Mumrills, "The Clergy and Mr. Thos. Leishman ;"by Mr. McKinlay, "The Scottish Bar and Mr. Robt. Aitken ;" by the Chairman, "The Croupiers;" by Mr. Thos. Hardie, "The Strangers and Mr. Joseph Mackay;" by Mr. Henry Baird, "The Ladies and Mr. Arch. Melville, by Dr. Gilmour, "The Curling Club and Mr. Hugh Rose ;" by the Chairman, "The Committee and Mr. Forgie." The company dispersed at a seasonable hour, all highly delighted with the happy evening they had spent. The village during the day had appearance, every house almost being decorated with flags, &c, showing the very high esteem the doctor is held in by all and sundry. The hall also was handsomely decorated by Mr. Nicol of Millfield and assistants with their usual good taste.

 

 

Falkirk Herald Saturday 26th March 1870

MR. NEILSON’S SALES

20 FAT CATTLE, & C.,

AT GOWNBANK,

ON MONDAY, 28TH MARCH.

MR. JAMES NEILSON begs to announce that he will Sell by Public Roup, on MONDAY the 28th March, 1870, at GOWANBANK (one mile South from Avonbridge), blonging to James Gowans, Esq.,

20 FAT WEST HIGHLAND QUEYS,

Prime Quality;

1 AYRSHIRE MILCH COW, near the Calving;

AND

A Few  TONS of PURE REGENT POTATOES  for Seed, which have been grown upon new land.

Roup to begin at Two o’clock.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 21st April 1870

By all interested in farming and stock-rearing - and the whole community comes more or less under this category - the enterprising and extensive programme of operations adopted on Thursday last by the Eastern District of Stirlingshire Agricultural Association must be regarded with much satisfaction; and we are certain that the hope is sincere and general that it may be carried out with the utmost degree of success. The undertaking that has now been entered upon with such cordiality promises to supply a long-felt want, and to bring us into a position from which it is no small matter of regret we have, from some cause or other, been for so many years excluded- The time used to be when Falkirk could boast of her cattle show; and it was a by no means discreditable exhibition, even for so rich and well situated a town as ours is. Like numerous other of our local institutions, however, its career came prematurely and abruptly to an end, and since then no substitute has been provided. But we have confidence in the belief that the desideratum is about to be amply fulfilled; indeed, if the association's intentions are given effect to, the neighbourhood will far more than regain all it has lost in the way of agricultural demonstrations, competitive and otherwise. In the first place, there is to be an exhibition of cattle, sheep, horses, dairy produce, and implements in the beginning of June next. In addition to Falkirk, it is to embrace the adjoining parishes of Airth, Bothkennar, Denny, Dunipace, Larbert, Muiravonside, Polmont, and Slamannan; so that it will be seen there is plenty of scope for a capital show, both as to the largeness and the quality of the turn-out. The association determined wisely when they resolved to throw open their yards in this comprehensive manner; and although Denny and Dunipace belong, strictly speaking, to the middle, and not to the eastern district of the county, we are glad they have been invited to go into the lists, as the aid of their energetic agriculturists and owners of stock will assuredly be a valuable acquisition to the forthcoming display. We trust, now the necessary machinery for getting up a really good exhibition has been fairly and auspiciouly set agoing, that the project will, by dint of the persevering energy of the promoters and the hearty co-operation of the public, rapidly proceed towards a prosperous and entirely triumphant issue. To all and sundry who can help it on we say - put your shoulders to the wheel and drive away. We know there is no lack of excellent working material. With such men as Provost Russel, Mr. Stark of Summerford, and others equally good and true at its back, the association has every chance of attaining to the summit of its aspirations. The result depends very much upon the members; if they want to succeed they must strenuously exert themselves. Unity should be cultivated; division avoided; and all ought, so far as in their power, to help on the common cause. If the tenant farmers properly acquit themselves of their duty, we have no doubt their efforts will be warmly seconded by the landlords, for whose advantage almost as much as for that of the farmers the proposed exhibition is. Subscriptions from, and the encouragement of, proprietors and others may safely be counted upon; but it is right that the tenants should rely in a great measure upon themselves, and with their unison and support difficulties must soon disappear and success be attained. It is also suggested that a competition for grain and seed should take place in spring; that a competition for seed wheat should be held in autumn; and that a competition for fat cattle and roots should come off on the same day as the annual poultry show. The plan altogether is most judiciously arranged, and we only hope that its eventuation may be in keeping with its conception. The association might also hazard extending its influence and aims still further. In various parts of the country farmers' clubs and kindred societies have adopted the custom of meeting for the purpose of debating and hearing each other’s minds upon agricultural subjects. In East Lothian, in particular, this practice has long been observed; farmers meet, read papers, and communicate to each other their ideas regarding topics which affect them; the newest scientific improvements are explained; and, in short, much is done to enlighten and instruct the cultivators of the soil. Why should our district association not do so likewise? What we have pointed out is worthy of being kept in view; but it is better that they should do what they have taken in hand well than neglecting it aim too ambitiously. Their primary object should be to maintain their summer show; and their purposed spring, autumn, and winter exhibitions ought also to receive all due attention. At any rate let not the association dwindle into nothingness - let it not fall into that state of decay which seems to eat away most of our local institutions. There is no reason why it should not live - everything and everybody are in its favour. In brief, its fate is a good deal in its own hands, and, if we are not mistaken, it could scarcely be in better.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 12th May 1870.

Lost, found &c.

FOUND, at Bulliondale Farm, near Avonbridge, by Falkirk, on Monday 9th May, 1 Brown COLT, two years old, and 1 Black FILLY, one year old. The owner or owners may have them by proving their property and paying expenses. – Apply as above.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 12th 19th 21st May 1870

EASTERN DISTRICT OF STIRLINGSHIRE AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION.

THE FIRST SHOW of CATTLE, HORSES, SHEEP, SWINE, DAIRY PRODUCE, POULTRY, & IMPLEMENTS, in connection with the above Association, will be held at Booth Place, Falkirk, on THURSDAY, 2nd June, 1870. The Parishes connected with the Show comprise Airth, Bothkennar, Denny, Dunipace, Falkirk, Larbert, Muiravonside, Polmont, and Slamannan. Entries Close on Tuesday, 31st May current. Premium Sheets, and all information, can be had from the Secretary.

JAMES EASON, Secy.

Commercial Court,

Falkirk,

5th May, 1870.

 

Falkirk Herald Thursday 28th  May 1870

EASTERN DISTRICT OF STIRLINGSHIRE AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION.

THE FIRST SHOW of CATTLE, HORSES, SHEEP, SWINE, DAIRY PRODUCE, POULTRY, & IMPLEMENTS, in connection with the above Association, will be held at Booth Place, Falkirk, on THURSDAY, 2nd June, 1870. The Parishes connected with the Show comprise Airth, Bothkennar, Denny, Dunipace, Falkirk, Larbert, Muiravonside, Polmont, and Slamannan. Entries Close on Tuesday, 31st May current.

In addition to the Prizes offered by the Society for Dairy Produce, the following will be given, viz.: - To the Maker of the First Prize Fresh Butter - A Dress, by Mrs. Gordon, Red Lion Hotel. To the Second - 1 lb. Finest Tea, by John Gentles, Grocer. For the First Prize Powdered Butter - A Parasol, by Messrs Coutts & Duncan, Drapers, Falkirk.

Premium Sheets, and all information, can be had from the Secretary.

JAMES EASON, Secy.

Commercial Court,

Falkirk,

5th May, 1870.

 

Falkirk Herald 16th June 1870

At Hollybush Cottage, Maddiston, by Linlithgow on the 14th instant, by the Rev. W. M. Nicholson, F.C. Linlithgow Mr. James Lonie, Caledonian Railway, Greenock to Mary youngest daughter of the late Mr. William Baird.

 

Falkirk Herald 25th June 1870

TORPHICHEN.

Fatal Accident. On Thursday afternoon an accident occurred near this village whereby a master builder named David M'Nair lost his life. Deceased was erecting a steading on the farm of Hillhouse, and on Thursday accompanied the carter, who was driving the stones for the building, to Maddiston Quarry, to give some instructions. The cart was there laden with two large stones, upwards of a ton in weight, and on its return home Mr. M'Nair, who was rather tired, got upon the cart in order to get a ride a portion of the way. The cart was drawn by two horses - one being in the trams and the other tracing- and it is thought that the trace horse had taken a sharp turn of the road took quick, and which had brought the tramhorse too close to the side of the road, and in consequence one of the wheels of the cart either came in contact with the dyke or a large stone whereby it wa