THE LEGEND OF ZELDA

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Hylian language

This is from www.kasuto.net. Enjoy.

 

Table Of Contents for the language
Hylian Font
Introduction to the Hylian language
The Hylian alphabet
Hylian Verbs
Hylian nouns
Hylian Pronouns
Hylian Adjectives
Hylian Numbers
Common Expressions
The Hylian dictionary
Hylian Literature

If for some reason the link doesn't work right, try right clicking the link and selecting "Save Target As..." (Internet Explorer), or "Save Link As..." (Netscape).

Download the Standard Hylian True Type font version 2.0

Download the Hylian Rounded Font

Sample of the standard Hylian font

 

Sample of the Hylian Rounded font

How to install the font: Once you have download the font, you must unzip it first, any Zip utility will do. Then open the Start Menu, go to "Settings", and click "Control Panel." Once you're in the control panel, open the "Fonts" folder. It should look something like this:

Now, click "File" and "Install New Font"

Select the folder you unzipped the font file to. Then it should appear in the "List of fonts" box. Select "Hylian" and click "OK". Congratulations! Now you have the Hylian font installed.

Using the font: If you want to just play around with the letters, then go ahead. But if you want to actually type real words, you have to know which keystrokes give which letters. I recommend using Character Map if you can't find the letter you want. Here is a table of all the Hylian letters, their keystrokes, and which transliterated letter they correspond to. An important note: in the characters where you have to use the "Alt" key, in order to get the letter to come up, you hold down "Alt" and punch in the number with the Numpad (make sure numlock is ON).
 
 

Hylian character
Keystroke
Transliterated 
character
a
a
? (Alt+0225), ? (Alt+0193)
?
A
?
? (Alt+0224), ? (Alt+0192)
?
b, B
b
c, C, k, K
k
d, D
d
e
e
? (Alt+0233), ? (Alt+0201)
?
E
?
? (Alt+0232), ? (Alt+0200)
?
f, F
f
g, G
g
h, H
h
i
i
? (Alt+0237), ? (Alt+0205)
?
I
?
? (Alt+0236), ? (Alt+0204)
?
j
j
J
jh
l, L
l
m, M
m
n, N
n
o
o
p, P
p
r, R
r
s
s
t
t
u
u
? (Alt+0250), ? (Alt+0218)
?
U
?
? (Alt+0249), ? (Alt+0217)
?
v, V
v
w, W
w
y, Y
y
z, Z
z
? (Alt+0227)
a?i
? (Alt+0195)
??.?
? (Alt+0226)
a?u
? (Alt+0194)
???
? (Alt+0238)
i?u
? (Alt+0206)
???
O
o?i
? (Alt+0244)
???
? (Alt+0245)
o?a
? (Alt+0213)
???
0
0
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
. (period)
.
 , (comma)
,
' (apostrophe)
'
!
!
 
The purpose of the Hylian Language Institute is to educate people on the grammar and history of the Hylian language. In the land of Hyrule, Modern Hylian takes a role similar to that of English in today's world. It is the official language of goverment, and all proceedings are conducted in Hylian. It is also the preferred language of commerce throughout most of the continent. All educated people speak the Hylian laguage and it forms a common ground between diplomats, scientists, and ordinary citizens. Most people speak Hylian natively, but many also speak it as a second language. One reason that Hylian has become so prevalent is simply the influence that Hyrule has in the continent. It is the largest economic power and is often the center of important diplomatic functions. Also, the Hylian Language Institute has played a significant role in the spread of Hylian. It is a group of citizens, professors, and government employees who frequently gather to review the state of the language. They have standardized the grammar based on the most widely accepted common usage, and that grammar is taught in all schools and universities. Even the lowest on the social ladder speak Hylian in almost the same way, there is no "King's Hylian". This is quite unusual in most kingdoms. The members of the Language Institute established schools and centers to educate all citizens in the language. All citizens of Hyrule are entitled to basic education in grammar. The Institute frequently modifies rules to conform to common usage, they do not try to restrict the growth of the language. This freedom is what has allowed Hylian to become so dominant.
 

History of Hylian

       The Modern Hylian laguage is derived from the language spoken by the ancient tribes that first inhabited Hyrule nearly three thousand years ago, called Proto-Hylian. Hylian was unique because it is one of the first languages known to have developed an alphabet. The modern Hylian alphabet has changed little in the past thousand years. Many modern languages use the Hylian aplhabet to represent their own languages.
     The development and evolution of Hylian follwed a similar path as the Indo-European languages on Earth. In fact, Hylian grammar and structure closely resembles that of many Indo-European languages such as Latin and Greek. This is very unusual. One would expect a language that developed on another world to be completely alien and unrelated to anything on earth. However, this is not the case. Hylian has undergone what can be called independent parallel development. Its language structure developed in much the same way as Proto-Indo-European did on earth. Theories exist as to why this is so. The most plausible theory supporting independent parallel development is the similarity of the cultures and the region. The Hylian continent is geographically similar to the Indo-European area of earth. Their climates are similar and their geographies are similar. Also, the cultures have developed in much the same way, with similar values and religions. Logic suggest that two species who are almost biologically identical and have similar cultures would develop similar languages. However, this could simply be one huge coincidence.
     Proto-Hylian was the first ancestor to modern Hylian. It is the first form of communication that could effectively be called a language. It was simply a way for the people in the area to comunicate with each other. Most of the tribes actually spoke the same language, which helped foster unity and peace over time. Proto-Hylian would be considered quite primitive by modern standards. It had no alphabet or standard gramar rules, it was simply a means of communication. Proto-Hylian was entirely oral, and did not develop a written form for quite some time.
    Ancient Hylian developed when the tribes began to coalesce into a single culture. They formed what could be called a kingdom, but not like modern kingdoms. There was a single leader who influenced the independent tribes and chiefs. Ancient Hylian was the first to develop a written form. Unlike Modern Hylian, Ancient Hylian used heiroglyphics and ideograms to write. Tiny pictures and characters represented ideas, not sounds. They would be similar to the Ancient Egyptian Heiroglyphics. Ancient Hylian became the binding force among the tribes that would eventually form the kingdom and language we know today.
    Old Hylian was a remarkable evolution in the language. It gradually replaced ideograms with phonetic characters. The aplhabet no longer represented ideas, but sounds. Old Hylian became standard as the kingdom of Hylia formed. It was the first central government that combined all the tribes, which by now were considered a single people. Hylia was similar to Ancient Rome, only smaller. For almost a thousand years, Hylia was the intellectual center of the continent and became the largest power.
    Middle Hylian continued the evolution of the language. It eventually adopted the alphabet that is used today. This period saw the expansion of the language to areas outside of Hylia. An equivalent to the Renaissance ocurred during this period, which only developed the language further.
     Modern Hylian emerged as a language during the transition from Hylia to Hyrule. The orginal Hylian kingdom was absorbed into the larger country of Hyrule, which included the original Hylian tribes and the surrounding peoples in the area. This outside influence worked its way into the hylian language, which eventually formed what Hyrulians speak today. It is similar to Modern English in that Modern Hylian contains many words and influences from other languages.
 
 

Why I Created This Language

    Of course, we all know that the Hylains and the land of Hyrule don't really exist. But it's fun to imagine what kind of world they live in. I have read so many stories, and seen so many drawings of the Zelda universe. But there was always one thing that I wanted to see: a language for the Hylians. Of course they wouldn't speak English or Japanese, they're from another world. So it only seemed natural to me to invent a language for them. There are a few Zelda sites out there that had "Hylian dictionaries". But these really said nothing about the languages. They were just a random collection of words that people threw together. None of them really meant anything. I decided to take the next step and create an actual language from scratch. A bunch of words don't mean anything unless there are rules and customs to tie them together. I always get a lot of questions like, "What's the word for -----?" Whenever people want to know about a foreign language, they want to know what certain words mean. So some would think that I would have to come up with a huge list of words. But I took the opposite path. Remember, words don't mean anything unless there are grammar rules to back them up. So I started with the grammar first. Grammar is the hardest part of inventing a language. First of all, a person obviously has to have a certain mastery of English grammar (or whatever native language they might speak) in order to create a new language. Fortunately, I do consider myself fairly competent in English mechanincs and grammar.
    The first thing I had to do when creating the Hylian grammar was to actually determine which grammatical functions I would use and define, such as adjectives, nouns, adverbs, etc. I basically used basic elements that are not only present in English grammar, but in the grammar of almost all human languages. It helps to have in interest in foreign languages. I, for example, speak Spanish, I am currently studying Arabic, and I plan on taking Chinese and Japanese. One major inspiration for Hylian was the artificial language (or as linguists call them "auxilliary languages") Esperanto. It was a language that was invented by Dr. L. L. Zamenhof in 1887. It's purpose was to foster peace between countries by creating a language that was easy to learn, and most of all, give everyone a linguistically equal footing. Everyone would be speaking it as a second language, so no one would have the advantage of being a native speaker. Obviously, this idea didn't really take off, considering that only linguistic geeks have ever heard of Esperanto. But Esperanto did give me a whole bunch of ideas to use for Hylian. One major characteristic of Esperanto is that all words are "grammar-coded". That means that each word has a certain ending that tells what part of speech it is and what function it plays in a sentence. I used this inspiration for Hylian. For example, Hylian singular nouns end in -e, and plural nouns end in -?n. This is true for all nouns, except for some proper nouns (names like "Zelda", "Link", etc.). And adjectives are similar too: singular adjectives end in -a, and plural adjectives end in -an. The list goes on forever, but you get the idea. Basically, I used my own creativity to create the grammar. Many of the Hylian grammar rules are similar to English and other Indo-European languages.
    Thinking of words is the next hardest part. There are a lot of words, and I have to think of each one. But thinking of a word isn't just coming up with something at random. I have to think of how it will conform to the rules, and how the word will sound. Ease of pronunciation is also an important thing to consider. Also, I try to make words sound foreign. If it sounds too much like English, then it sounds corny. Some words are inspired by Romance languages and Latin. For example, the Hylian word "to?re", which means "world", was inspired by the Spanish "tierra" and Latin "terra", which mean "earth". Notice the connection? Sometimes I use languages like Japanese for inspiration. For example, the Hylian "sajana.i", which means "goodbye", is based on the Japanese "ja ne", which is a colloquialism for "goodbye". Also, the Hylian "oha.io", which means "hello", came from the Japanese "ohayo", which means "good morning". Of course, sometimes words just come out of nowhere. Like the Hylian "jhatag", for "to speak", just sounded cool to me.
    The alphabet was another prime concern. It took me a while to figure that out. I tried to use some of the glyphs seen on walls and doors in Ocarina of Time as a basis for some of the letters. You'll notice that all the letters are squarish or rectangular. They looked like that in the game, so I decided to go with it. Creating the alphabet has taken a while. I am still perfecting it. When I originally created it, I thought it looked good. But as the alphabet became second-nature to me, I realized that some of the letters looked too much like our alphabet. So I changed a few of the letters. Then after a little longer, I still thought they looked too much like English, so I changed them again. The changes aren't major, but they are significant.The only real changes to the letters were addition or removal of lines. So if you really want to get into this language, I recommend checking every now and then to see if I tweaked the alphabet, grammar stays pretty much the same.
 

    That's really all I have to say about this. If you want to really get into the language, then read the grammar sections. I'll tell you right now: this isn't going to be something that will be completed overnight. developing a real language is going to take me a while. But it'll get done eventually . 
 
The Hylian alphabet is phonetic in nature, i.e. each symbol represents a disctinct sound. This is similar to the English alphabet, but is much more definite. Each Hylian letter represents only one and only one sound. The letters themselves are very simple block letters. Notice that the shapes consist only of right angles and straight lines, which makes the letters very simple to write and easy to discern.

The most important aspect of the language is transliteration of the words from the Hylian alphabet to the Roman alphabet. Transliteration is spelling the words from a foriegn alphabet into another alphabet. Translation is telling what the word means in another language. Don't confuse transliteration with translation.

A fact that makes the Hylian language easy to learn is that the letters are read from left to right and top to bottom. In other words, Hylian is read the same way English is. Many alphabets, such as the Roman alphabet which we use, has capital and lowercase letters. Hylian however, has only one set of letters. There are no capital or lowercase letters, all are in the same case.
 

Hylian Letter
Transliteration
Name
Pronunciation
a
 akte
(AHK-tay)
Like the a in "father".
?
akte as?nta
(AHK-tay 
ah-SENN-tah)
Accented version of the above letter, used in words that do not follow the normal stress pattern. This is not considered a seperate letter, it is a different form of akte.
 ?
 ?kte
(ACK-tay)
Like the a in "hat".
?
?kte
(ACK-tay 
ah-SENN-tah)
Accented version of the above letter, used in words that do not follow the normal stress pattern. This is not considered a seperate letter, it is a different form of ?kte.
a?i
 a.ite
(EYE-tay)
Like the word "I". This is a diphthong that is a combonation of akte and ite. It is pronounced as a single sound.
< >
???
a.ite as?nta
(EYE-tay
ah-SENN-tah)
Accented version of the above letter, used in words that do not follow the normal stress pattern. This is not considered a seperate letter, it is a different form of a.ite.
a.u
a.ute
(OW-tay)
Like the ow in "how". This is a diphthong that is a combonation of akte and ute. It is pronounced as a single sound.
???
a.ute as?nta
(OW-tay
ah-SENN-tah)
Accented version of the above letter, used in words that do not follow the normal stress pattern. This is not considered a seperate letter, it is a different form of a.ute.
b
bete
(BAY-tay)
Pronounced the same as English b.
d
 date
(DAH-tay)
Pronounced the same as English d.
 e
 ete
(EY-tay)
Like the a in "hate".
?
ete as?nta
(EY-tay 
ah-SENN-tah)
Accented version of the above letter, used in words that do not follow the normal stress pattern. This is not considered a seperate letter, it is a different form of ete.
 ?
 ?nte
(ENN-tay)
Like the e in "get".
?
?nte as?nta
(ENN-tay
ah-SENN-tah)
Accented version of the above letter, used in words that do not follow the normal stress pattern. This is not considered a seperate letter, it is a different form of ?nte.
f
fete
(FAY-tay)
Pronounced the same as English f.
g
gante
(GONN-tay)
Pronounced like an English hard g, as in "give".
h
h?nte
(HEN-tay)
Pronounced the same as English h.
 i
 ite
(EE-tay)
Like the ee in "see".
?
ite as?nta
(EE-tay
ah-SENN-tah)
Accented version of the above letter, used in words that do not follow the normal stress pattern. This is not considered a seperate letter, it is a different form of ite.
 ?
 ?nte
(INN-tay)
Like the i in "give".
 ?
  ?nte as?nta
(INN-tay
ah-SENN-tah)
Accented version of the above letter, used in words that do not follow the normal stress pattern. This is not considered a seperate letter, it is a different form of ?nte.
i?u
i.ute
(YOU-tay)
Like the word "you". This is a diphthong that is a combonation of ite and ute. It is pronounced as a single sound.
???
i.ute as?nta
(YOU-tay
ah-SENN-tah)
Accented version of the above letter, used in words that do not follow the normal stress pattern. This is not considered a seperate letter, it is a different form of i.ute.
j
jate
(JAH-tay)
Pronounced the same as English j or soft g.
jh
jhete
(ZHAY-tay)
Like the s in "measure", or j in French "Jacques".
k
kate
(KAH-tay)
Pronounced the same as English k.
l
lete
(LAY-tay)
Pronounced the same as English l.
m
mate
(MAH-tay)
Pronounced the same as English m.
n
note
(NO-tay)
Pronounced the same as English n.
 o
 ote
(OH-tay)
 Like the o in "home".
?
ote as?nta
(OH-tay
ah-SENN-tah)
Accented version of the above letter, used in words that do not follow the normal stress pattern. This is not considered a seperate letter, it is a different form of ote.
o?a
to.ate
(TAW-tay)
Like the aw in "law". This is a diphthong that is a combonation of ote and akte. It is pronounced as a single sound. 
???
to.ate as?nta
(TAW-tay
ah-SENN-tah)
Accented version of the above letter, used in words that do not follow the normal stress pattern. This is not considered a seperate letter, it is a different form of to.ate.
p
pate
(PAH-tay)
Pronounced the same as English p.
r
rote
(ROW-tay)
Pronounced the same as English r.
s
sate
(SAH-tay)
Pronounced the same as English s. It is always pronounced like the s in "sit". It never sounds like the s in "dogs".
sh
sh?nte
(SHIN-tay)
Pronounced the same as English sh.
t
tote
(TOE-tay)
Pronounced the same as English t.
th
thate
(THAH-tay)
Pronounced like the th in English "thin". It is never pronounced like the th "the".
 u
 ute
(OOH-tay)
 Like the oo in "food".
?
ute as?nta
(OOH-tay
ah-SENN-tah)
Accented version of the above letter, used in words that do not follow the normal stress pattern. This is not considered a seperate letter, it is a different form of ute.
 ?
 ?nte
(UN-tay)
 Like the u "fun".
?
?nte as?nta
(UN-tay
ah-SENN-tah)
Accented version of the above letter, used in words that do not follow the normal stress pattern. This is not considered a seperate letter, it is a different form of ?nte.
 v
 vete
(VAY-tay)
Pronounced the same as English v.
w
wante
(WONN-tay)
Pronounced the same as English w.
y
yote
(YOE-tay)
Pronounced the same as English y. It is always used as a consonant as in "yes", never as a vowel as in "my".
z
zante
(ZAHN-tay)
Pronounced the same as English z.

Word Stress

One of the most important rules to know in order to speak properly is the proper stressing of syllables in a word. Some languages, such as Japanese place very little emphasis on syllable stress. Other languages, such as ones in the Indo-European family (which includes English), have very specific rules for which syllables to stress in a word. English happens to have very irregular stress patterns in its words, mainly because of the vast influences from foreign languages. Fortunately, Hylian has very regular stress patterns.

1. All words have their primary stress on the second to last syllable, unless there is a written accent mark. If there is an accent mark, then the marked syllable receives the primary stress.

2. All words have secondary stresses on the fourth to last syllable, unless there is a written accent mark. If there is an accent mark, then the secondary stress falls on every other syllable before the accent mark. For example, the word "hipar?duse" has an irregular stress pattern because it has an accent mark. The stress pattern for this word is /hi" par a' du se/. The third syllable /a'/ is stressed. The secondary stress is on /hi"/, which is the first syllable.

3. All syllables that do not receive a primary or secondary stress are unstressed. And all syllables after an accent mark are also unstressed.

4. When there is an apostrophe, the stress rules for the original word do not change. The original word is stressed as if it had no extra ending added to it. All the syllables after the apostrophe are always unstressed.

Below is a chart illustrating the stress rules.

The main stress is bold and indicated by an apostrophe ('), secondary stresses are indicatied by a double quote ("), unstressed syllables have no markings

Word
Stress Pattern
dege
dege
de' ge
veuarde
veuarde
ve" u ar' de
hipar&duse
hipar?duse
hi" par a' du se
 faeuire
faeuire
 fa e" u ir' e
Words with apostrophes retain the stress of the original word, the letters after the apostrophe are unstressed.

kasuto'sa
Kasuto'sa
ka su' to sa


A very convenient aspect of the Hylian language is that all verbs follow a regular conjugation pattern. First off, you must know what a conjugated verb is. A conjugated verb is one that takes a subject; it is doing something. For example: I eat food. In this sentence, the verb eat is conjugated, it takes the subject I. Any unconjugated verb is called an infinitive. In English, the infinitive usually looks like to be or to eat, with the preposition to indicating that it is infinitive. Look at this example: Verb: to be  Conjugations: I am, you are, he/she/it is, we are, you are, they are. In English, to be is irregular because it does not follow the normal pattern of adding an -s to the third person singular. In Hylian, all verbs are regular. That means that they all follow the same conjugation pattern. Each tense has a unique ending that is only used for that verb, and not for any other type of word. Here are the endings for Hylian verbs, using ta.irag, to be, as an example.
 

=ag
-ag
t@rag
Infinitive ending. To be.
=as
-as
t@ras
Present tense. (you) are.
=es
-es
t@res
Past tense. (you) were.
=os
-os
t@ros
Future tense. (you) will be.
=ant
-ant
t@rant
Present perfect tense. (you) have been.
=Ent
-?nt
t@rEnt
Past perfect tense. (you) had been.
=ont
-ont
t@ront
Future perfect tense. (you) will have been.
=ans
-ans
t@rans
Imperative mood, a command. (you) be

These endings are unique only to the verbs. That means that a word that ends in -as can only be a verb that is in the present tense. This makes understanding a word's part of speech very easy. In English it can be very difficult to tell what a word means if it is out of context. Take turn for example. It can be a verb: I turn; or it can be a noun: a left turn. As in English, a noun must have an explicit subject or an understood one. For example: I run. The subject of that sentence is I. The subject was explicitly stated. Here is an example of an understood subject: run. In that sentence, the subject you was understood because it was a command. Hylian works the same way. For each tense, the verb ending stays the same regardless of who is doing the action.
 

bagu t@ras
bagu ta.iras
I am
t@u t@ras
ta..iu ta..iras
You (singular) are
Eru t@ras
?ru ta.iras
He is
nosu t@ras
nosu ta.iras
We are
vosu t@ras
vosu ta.iras
You (plural) are
iEru t@ras
i?ru ta.iras
They are

Notice that the -as ending didn't change even when the subject changed. This rule stays the same for all verbs in all tenses. In certain cases, a subject is not needed. In commands, or in sentences with more than one verb and the subject doesn't change, the subject need only be stated once. Take these examples:

bagu koemes Ek goeares ab taz koeme.
Bagu koemes ?k goeares az koeme.
I ate and (I) liked the food.

lintans ab jhatag hilane.
Lintans ab jhatag hilane.
(You) Learn (how) to speak Hylian.

The most important aspect of a verb is its tense. The tense tells when the action happened. I reviewed the tenses above, but I will now explain them in further detail.
 

Verb Tenses
Ending
Ending
Explanation
=as
-as
Present tense - Krone Akantroshe. This describes an action that is happening now. When people talk, most of what they say is in the present tense. I am happy ~ Bagu ta.iras f?lzana. Please note that this is the pure form of the verb, the progressive, I am eating, will be explained later. 
=es
-es
Past tense - Krone Depotroshe. This describes an action that happened sometime in the past; it may or may not have been completed. I ate the food ~ Bagu koemes az koeme.
=os
-os
Future tense - Krone Baakantroshe. This describes an action that will take place sometime in the future. Please note that English uses the helping verb will to express the future tense, Hylian does not use a helping verb; it simply changes the ending of the infinitive. I will speak to her ~ Bagu jhatos ak s?ru.
=ant
-ant
Present perfect tense - Krone Akantroshe da.ia Kimare. This describes an action that has been completed in the past. In English, the present tense of the verb have is used as a helping verb along with the past participle, Hylian does not use helping verbs to form any of the perfect tenses, and the past participle does not exist in Hylian. I have seen it ~ Bagu miarant ab ru. He has seen it ~ ?ru miarant ab ru.
=Ent
-?nt
Past perfect tense - Krone Depotroshe da.ia Kimare. This describes an action that was completed in the past, and completed before another said action. In English, it is usually formed with the helping verb had. I had already eaten the food before she arrived ~ Bagu yaz koem?nt az koeme depoto s?ru yovtes.
=ont
-ont
Future perfect tense - Krone Baakantroshe da.ia Kimare. This describes an action that will be completed in the future before another future action. Link will arrive in the morning and I will have finished my work ~ Link yovtos ?nt taz minaze ?k bagu torimont ab bagu'sa t?nske.
=ans
-ans
Imperative mood - S?nte Jushipe. Strictly speaking, this is not a tense, it is a mood. The verb itself does not have a time of ocurrance, but it is understood to take place in the present. The imperative mood is used to give a command to someone. In English, the subject you is understood, and is not usually stated. In Hylian, the subject (whom you are giving the command to) does not need to be stated if it can be determined by context, i.e. you're talking directly to that person. However, the subject can be stated for emphasis or clarification. (You) Be quiet ~ (Ta.iu) Ta.irans sikwala. You (guys, plural) speak quietly ~ Vosu jhatans sikwalok.
Special Note: The imperative mood is also used to give a "nosu" command. This would be equivalent to the English "Let's (do something)". For example: Let's leave ~ Nosu s?lrans. Notice that in Hylian, the subject nosu is usually stated. However, in certain contexts it can be omitted, i.e. talking directly with each other and there is no ambiguity.


Objects

Another important concept of verbs is their objects, either direct or indirect object. A direct object is what the verb affects directly, it usually answers the question who? or what? For example:
  • I read the book ~ Bagu l?rdes az l?rde. The word book is the direct object of the verb read. It answers the question what?

An indirect object is the person or object that the action was performed for, it answers the questions to whom?, for whom?, to what?, or for what? In an English sentence, the indirect object usually comes before the direct object.

  • I gave him the book. Book is the direct object, and him is the indirect object.
  • I gave the book to him. This has the exact same meaning as the above sentence, but notice that the indirect object came after the direct object. The indirect object is indicated by the preposition to.

Verbs that take direct objects are called transitive verbs, verbs that do not take direct objects are intransitive verbs. A transitive verb can have a direct object or both a direct and an indirect object. An intransitive has either an indirect object or no object at all. Sometimes it can be confusing in sentences with the word to, because prepositional or adverbial phrases that start with to may not be objects at all.

  • They walked to the house. In this sentence, to the house is not an indirect object because it does not tell to/for whom? or to/for what? The phrase to the house is an adverbial phrase that modifies the verb walk. It tells where they walked. An adverb answers the questions where?, when?, how?, or to what extent? In this sentence, it answers the question where. Where did they walk? They walked to the house.
  • She spoke. In this sentence, the verb spoke is intransitive because it has no direct object.
    She spoke to him. In this sentence, the verb spoke is also intransitive because it has no direct object. But please note that it does have an indirect object, to him. This is perfectly acceptable.She spoke Hylian. In this sentence, the verb spoke is transitive because it has the direct object Hylian. The object tells what she spoke.She spoke Hylian to him. In this sentence, the verb spoke is transitive bcause it has the direct object Hylian. But also note that it has the indirect object him. Hylian tells what she spoke, him tells to whom she spoke.

Here is an overview of objects in the Hylian language:

In a Hylian sentence, the order is usually subject, verb, direct object, and indirect object.
bagu diares ab taz lerde ank Eru.
Bagu diares az l?rde ank ?ru.
I gave the book to him.

Hylian sentences use verbal particles to indicate that something is a direct or indirect object.
 

ab
ab
Direct object particle. This word does not have a literal translation into English. It is used in a sentence to indicate that the following word or phrase is the direct object of the verb. 
ank
ank
Indirect object particle. This word can be literally translated as "to" or "for." It indicates that the following word or phrase is the indirect object of the verb.


Verbal Adjuncts

There are a few special words in Hylian called verbal adjuncts. They are words that are used in conjunction with a verb to change its meaning. One thing you may notice about Hylian is that there is no present or past participle. For example, in English, the present participle of do is doing and the past participle is done. Not having participles can make Hylian confusing to new speakers. However, the verbal adjuncts give the verb a special meaning that correspond to certain tenses in English. An adjunct is always placed directly in front of a conjugated verb. Here are some rules for using adjuncts:

1. An adjunct always comes directly before a conjugated verb. If a subject is stated, the adjunct comes between the subject and verb. You can never seperate the adjunct from the verb, the adjunct must always come first.

2. Sometimes a verb can have more than one adjunct modifying it. In this case, both adjuncts must be placed together, and come directly before the verb.

3. Pay close attention to the specific rules for each adjunct. Some adjuncts can be used with all tenses, and some are used with only one verb tense. Using the incorrect verb tense can drastically change the meaning of the sentence.
 

Progressive Adjunct - Jhunte Ra.uka
Si
shi
This word gives the verb a progressive meaning. In English, the progressive is formed by combining a form of to be with the present participle of a verb. For example: I am reading, I was reading, I will be reading, I have been reading, I had been reading, and I will have been reading. In Hylian, simply add the adjunct shi directly before the verb to create a progressive meaning. The tense of the Hylian verb is the same as the tense of to be in English.
bagu Si lErdas.
Bagu shi l?rdas.
I am reading.
bagu Si lErdes.
Bagu shi l?rdes.
I was reading.
bagu Si lErdos.
Bagu shi l?rdos.
I will be reading.
bagu Si lErdant.
Bagu shi l?rdant.
I have been reading.
bagu Si lErdEnt.
Bagu shi l?rd?nt.
I had been reading.
bagu Si lErdont.
Bagu shi l?rdont.
I will have been reading.

Imperfect Adjunct - Jhunte Vokimara
So
sho
This word gives the verb an imperfect meaning. It is roughly equivalent to saying used to in English. It denotes a sense of incompletion or continuity with regard to the past. For all practical purposes, it is used in the same way as used to. Please note that this adjunct is only used with the past tense of the verb.
bagu So lErdes.
Bagu sho l?rdes.
I used to read.

Subjunctive Adjunct - Jhunte Kateha
S@
sha.i
This word gives the verb a subjunctive meaning. It denotes a sense of uncertainty or conjecture regarding something. In English, the actual subjunctive mood is rarely used. The true subjunctive in English goes like this: If I were a millionare, I'd buy a mansion. In that sentence, were is in the subjunctive mood. The word sha.i can be more accurately described in terms of the English words might and may. They denote a sense of uncertainty: I might do it, He may not be there. In Hylian, the subjunctive adjunct is used when may or might is used in English. Please note that this adjunct is only used with the present and present perfect tenses.
bagu S@ lErdas.
Bagu sha.i l?rdas.
I might (may) read.
bagu S@ lErdant.
Bagu sha.i l?rdant.
I might (may) have read.


Conditional Adjunct - Jhunte Tashiza
SO
sho.i
This word gives the verb a conditional meaning. It is equivalent to the English usage of the word would. It tells what a person would do. I would go if I had the money. Notice that the conditional is often used in conjunction with an if clause. Notice also that the conditional adjunct is used only with the present and present perfect tenses.
bagu SO lErdas.
Bagu sho.i l?rdas.
I would read.
bagu SO lErdant.
Bagu sho.i l?rdant.
I would have read.

Imperative Adjunct - Jhunte Jushipa
Se
she
This gives the verb an imperative mood. It is used to give a command that is less forceful than using the actual imperative mood. It is equivalent to saying should or ought to. You should not smoke, You ought to be nice to your brother. This adjunct is used only with the present and present perfect tenses.
t@u Se lErdas ab za lErde.
Ta.iu she l?rdas ab za l?rde.
You should (ought to) read this book.
t@u Se lErdant ab za lErde.
Ta.iu she l?rdant ab za l?rde.
You should (ought to) have read this book.

Super-Imperative Adjunct - Jhunte Mojushipa
Sa
sha
This gives the verb an imperative meaning, but it much more forceful than the above adjunct. It tells what a person must do, and is one step down from giving a direct command. It gives a feeling of necessity and duty to the sentence, as in You must go home.
t@u Sa lErdas ab za lErde.
Ta.iu sha l?rdas ab za l?rde.
You must read this book.

Conditional Ability Adjunct - Jhunte 
Su
shu
This is used to say that something could be done, but there is some doubt or uncertainty about it. This is different from the verb panktag which denotes definite ability. I can speak Hylian ~ Bagu jhatas ab hilana. This sentence denotes a sense of certainty and definiteness. I could speak hylian if I learned it ~ Bagu shu jhatas ab hilana at (bagu) lintes ab ru. This sentence describes the ability to speak Hylian, but there is a doubt or condition surrounding it. This adjunct is used with the present and present perfect tense, but the verb in the following if clause is often in the past or past perfect tense.
bagu Su Jatas ab hilane at lintes ab ru.
Bagu shu jhatas ab hilane at lintes ab ru.
I could speak Hylian if I learned it.
bagu Su Jatant ab hilane at lintEnt ab ru.
Bagu shu jhatant ab hilane at lint?nt ab ru.
I could have spoken Hylian if I had learned it.


Passive Adjunct - Jhunte Jujowa
Siu
shiu
Because there are no participles in Hylian, it makes it difficult to create a sentence with a passive meaning. In English, the passive voice turns what would normally be the subject of the verb into an object. For example, the active voice would be I read the book, the passive voice would be The book was read by me. The subject I becomes the object me and the object book becomes the subject. In Hylian, the passive voice doesn't work exactly that way. There is no way to say by me. However, a passive meaning can be given to the sentence by adding the adjunct shiu. Note however that you cannot state who the action was performed by, you can only state what the action was performed upon. It would be something like this: Taz l?rde shiu l?rdes ~ The book was read. This adjunct is roughly equivalent to the impersonal se in Spanish.
taz lErde siu lErdas.
Taz l?rde shiu l?rdas.
The book is read.
taz lErde Siu lErdes.
Taz l?rde shiu l?rdes.
The book was read.
taz lErde Siu lErdos.
Taz l?rde shiu l?rdos.
The book will be read.
taz lErde Siu lErdant.
Taz l?rde shiu l?rdant.
The book has been read.
taz lErde Siu lErdEnt.
Taz l?rde shiu l?rd?nt.
The book had been read.
taz lErde Siu lErdont.
Taz l?rde shiu l?rdont.
The book will have been read.
 

Reflexive Adjunct - Jhunte Riuka
Site
shite
This adjunct makes the verb reflexive. It reflects the action of the verb back to the subject. It would be like saying "He -verb- himself" or "He -verb- to himself". The relexive adjunct is usually used a lot more commonly in Hylian than the -self pronouns are in English. However, many instances of this adjunct can be understood by context, so they don't always have to be used.

 


Negating a Verb

One important fact about Hylian verbs is negating a verb. To negate a verb means to make it negative. In English, this is usually done by adding the helping verb do + not. For example: I do not read. In Hylian, a verb is negated by placing the word naz in between the subject and verb (if there ia an adjunct, it is placed before the adjunct).

bagu naz lErdes az lerde.
Bagu naz l?rdes az l?rde.
I did not read the book.

Eru naz SO lErdas az lerde.
?ru naz sho.i l?rdas az l?rde.
He would not read the book.

Please note that the word naz is only used for negating a verb, and is not use for anything else. If you want to say "no" as a response to a question or as an interjection, use the word nani.

nani, bagu naz koemes az koeme.
Nani, bagu naz koemos az koeme.
No, I will not eat the food.


Passive Voice

An unusual aspect of Hylian verbs is that there is not true passive voice. In English, the passive voice is used by combining the verb be with the past participle of a verb. Because Hylian has no participles, it is impossible to write a purely passive sentece. However, to give a sentence a passive meaning, the passive adjunct shiu is used. The denotes that the subject takes on the meaning of an object. Read the adjuncts section for further explanation.


Pro-verb

Do not confuse a pro-verb with a proverb. A proverb is a short saying or quote, a pro-verb is a verb that takes the place of another verb or verb phrase in a sentence. This is used frequently in English, but most speakers don't even know that they are doing it. For example: I completed my work just like he did. The word did takes the place of the verb completed. This sentence could have also been written I completed my work just like he completed (his). English-speakers often use a form of the verb do as a pro-verb.

Hylian uses the regular verb dag as its pro-verb, it is conjugated just like any other verb in all tenses.

bagu biankes az trofaSe, lo masan Aktriu des.
Bagu biankes azz trofashe, lo masan ?ktriu des.
I sought the Triforce, as many others did (as did many others). 
  
  
A noun is a person, place, thing, or idea. An important characteristic of Hylian nouns is that the vast majority of them follow a regular pattern. Unlike English, in which nouns can have almost any ending, Hylian nouns all have the same ending. Plurality is also indictated by a regular pattern. Below are the two noun endings.
 

Singular Nouns
Plural Nouns
=e
-e
All regular singular nouns have an -e ending. No other part of speech has this ending. So a word that ends in -e can only be a singular noun and nothing else. Here are examples of nouns:

lErde L?rde = Book
brinste Brinste = Arm

=En
-?n
All regular plural nouns have an -?n ending. No other part of speech has this ending. So a word that ends in -?n can only be a plural noun and nothing else. Here are examples of plural nouns:

lErdEn L?rd?n = Books
BrinstEn Brinst?n = Arms

Gender

    Many languages, such as Spanish and French, assign nouns a grammatical gender. For example, the Spanish word lap?z, which means "pencil," is masculine; while the word fotograf?a, which means "photograph," is feminine. If this makes no sense to you, then you're on the right track. In other languages grammatical gender is assigned to all words, even inanimate objects. However, in English, words have no grammatical gender. They only have a natural gener, i.e. "woman" is feminine, and "man" is masculine. Hylian also uses natural gender for words. It has an invariable definite article which does not change with gender. There are gender neutral words, as well as gender specific words, as in English. There is a regular way of turning a gender neutral word into a gender specific word. Here are some examples:
 
 

lErde l?rde Book - Gender neutral
piante piante Parent - Gender neutral
pi&ntile pi?ntile Father - Gender specific, masculine
pi&ntine pi?ntine Mother - Gender specific, feminine

Forming Gender-Specific Words

    Forming a gender-specific noun confroms to a regular pattern. It involves taking the word stem and adding a suffix. When a gender suffix is added to the word, please note that an accent mark is added to preserve the stress of the original word. Here is an example using dege, which means "deity" or "god": IMPORTANT NOTE: Only nouns can take a gender-specific subject, adjectives don't. When using an adjective to describe a gender-specific noun, the adjective only has to agree in number.
 

Neutral Word
Stem
+
Suffix
+
e
=
New Word
dege
deg
+
-il
+
e
=
d?gile
dege
deg
+
-in
+
e
=
d?gine
 
Original Word
Definition
New Word
Definition
dege
"Deity", gender-neutral
d?gile
"God", masculine
dege
"Deity", gender-neutral
d?gine
"Goddess", feminine
 
Adjectives are words that describe nouns or pronous. They give some kind of information about the modified word. Adjectives also follow a regular pattern. All adjectives have the same ending. However, some words have the same ending as adjectives, but are not adjectives. Some common exceptions will be shown later. Adjectives can come before or after the word they modify, but it is more common to see an adjective come after the noun. Adjectives are the only other part of speech other than nouns that change ending when plural. Adjectives must agree in number with the noun or pronoun they modify; singular words take a singular adjective, and plural words take plural adjectives. The two adjective endings are shown below.
 
Singular Adjectives
Plural Adjectives
=a
-a
All regular singular adjectives have an -a ending. There are some exceptions, but those will be listed later. A singular adjective is used only with a singular noun or singular pronoun.
=an
-an
All regular plural adjectives have an -an ending. There are no exceptions for plural adjectives. A plural adjective is used only with a plural noun or plural pronoun

 


 
Adjective
Noun
Noun-Adjective Phrase
alba
alba
holy
d)gine
d?gine
goddess
d)gine alba
d?gine alba
holy goddess
alban
alban
holy
d)ginEn
d?gin?n
goddesses
d)ginEn alban
d?gin?n alban
holy goddesses
SPECIAL NOTE: The order of nouns and adjectives in Hylian is fairly loose. They can come either before or after the nouns they modify, but afterward is more common.


Exceptions to the Adjective Rule


Words with an -a ending that are not adjectives
d@a
da.ia
of preposition
dOa
do.ia
from preposition
kwa
kwa
that, which, who relative pronoun
Words that are adjectives, but do not have an -a ending
taz
taz the defininte article, technically an adjective
raz
raz a, an indefininte article, technically an adjective


Demonstrative Adjectives

    A demonstrative adjective is a word that specifies what a noun is. In Enlgish, they are equivalent to "this", "that", etc. These words are always followed by a noun, and always describe a noun, e.g. "this book." Here are the most commonly-used demonstrative adjectives in Hylian:
 
Adjective
Definition
Example
za za this za itsakupande - this encyclopedia
zan zan these zan itsakupand?n - these encyclopedias
zata zata that zata itsakupande - that encyclopedia
zatan zatan those zatan itsakupand?n - those encyclopedias


Possessive Adjectives

    These adjectives show possession of something. In English, words like "my" and "your" can be pronouns or adjective, depending on context. The same is true in Hylian, this section deals with the adjective form of possessives. Any word can be made into a possessive adjective by adding a simple suffix "-'sa" or "-'san", depending on whether or not the word being modified is plural or singular; these are equivalent to English's use of the apostrophe+s. Please note that when adding this suffix, the stress of the original word is preserved, but there is no written accent mark. Here are some examples:
 
Word
Possessive
Definition
kasuto Kasuto kasuto'sa
kasuto'san
Kasuto'sa
Kasuto'san
Kasuto's
bagu bagu bagu'sa
bagu'san
bagu'sa
bagu'san
my
t@u ta.iu t@u'sa
t@u'san
ta.iu'sa
ta.iu'san
your
nosu nosu nosu'sa
nosu'san
nosu'sa
nosu'san
our
Examples
Singular
Plural
zu t@ras kasuto'sa lErde.
Zu ta.iras Kasuto'sa l?rde.
This is Kasuto's book.
ziu t@ras kasuto'san lerdEn.
Ziu ta.iras Kasuto'san l?rd?n.
These are Kasuto's books.
sEru t@ras bagu'sa pi&ntine.
S?ru ta.iras bagu'sa pi?ntine.
She is my mother.
iru t@ras bagu'san pi&ntinEn.
Iru ta.iras bagu'san pi?nt?n.
They are my parents.
Eru t@ras sEru'sa akime.
?ru ta.iras s?ru'sa akime.
He is her friend.
iEru t@ras sEru'san akimEn.
I?ru ta.iras s?ru'san akim?n.
They are her friends.
IMPORTANT NOTE:When nouns or pronouns are made into possessives, grammatically they become adjectives and behave like adjectives. Kasuto is a noun, but Kasuto'sa is an adjective.


Using Numbers as Adjectives

    Numbers are frequently used as adjectives. They are used when telling the quantity of something, or telling how many things there are. Using a number strictly as and adjective, i.e. as in There are three people here, is stricly a matter of changing the ending of the number.
 
 

Cardinal Numbers

    Cardinal numbers are simple counting numbers, as in one, two, three. In Hylian, the nound forms would be hire, dise, troe. To turn a cardinal number into an adjective, simply change the -e ending to an -a or -an ending, depending on whether or not it's plural. Most of the time, only hire(one) will be used in the singular, and the rest are plural. Please note that in large compound numbers, as in sid?me kose (seventy-four), only the last word in the number changes to an adjective ending, e.g. sid?me kose becomes sid?me kosa.
 

Cardinal Number
Adjective Form
Example
hire
hire
hira
hira
bagu tEnshas hira r;pie.
Bagu t?nshas hira r?pie.
I have one rupee.
hEnte
h?nte
hEntan
h?ntan
sEru koemes ab hentan pakstEn.
S?ru koemes ab h?ntan pakst?n.
She ate six pastries.
DEme onte
d?me onte
dEme ontan
d?me ontan
siEru tEnSas ab dEme ontan r;piEn.
Si?ru t?nshas ab d?me ontan r?pi?n.
They have eighteen rupees.

Ordinal Numbers

    An ordinal number is used to tell the rank or position of something in a list or group. It is equivalent to English's use of words like first, second, third, fourth, fifth and so on. In Hylian, ordinal numbers are formed by taking the word base (e.g., the word base of hire is hir) and adding -ashe for the noun form or -asha for the adjective form. Here are some examples:
 

Normal
Base
Noun Form
Adjective Form
hire
hire
hir=
hir-
hiraSe
hirashe
hiraSa
hirasha
dEme
d?me
dEm=
d?m-
dEmaSe
d?mashe
dEmaSa
d?masha

 

Examples
Singular
Plural
zatu t@ras taz kosaSa lErde kwa bagu katabes.
Zatu ta.iras taz koshasa l?rde kwa bagu katabes.
That is the fourth book (that) I wrote.
iEru t@res taz hiraSan hitEn kwa vies ak hirule.
I?ru ta.iras taz hirashan hit?n kwa vies ak hirule.
They are the first people that went to Hyrule.


Predicate Adjectives

    A predicate adjective describes the subject of a sentence, linked to the subject with a linking verb (such as "to be" in English). Like simple noun-adjective phrases, the predicate adjective must agree with the subject in number. The subject could be a simple noun, a group of nouns, or a pronoun. Here are examples of simple sentences with predicate adjectives.
 
Examples
Singular
Plural
zatu t@ras taz kosaSa lErde kwa bagu katabes.
Zatu ta.iras taz koshasa l?rde kwa bagu katabes.
That is the fourth book (that) I wrote.
iEru t@res taz hiraSan hitEn kwa vies ak hirule.
I?ru ta.iras taz hirashan hit?n kwa vies ak hirule.
They are the first people that went to Hyrule.

 

The Hylian number and mathematical system is exactly the same as the Arabic numeral system. It uses base-10 numerals, where each successive numeral increases in value by a power of ten (in other words, they write and use numbers the same way we do).

However, the way numbers are written out in words and how they are pronounced is very different from our system. There are some similarities, and they become easy to understand once you've learned them.
 
 

Hylian
Arabic
English
 
Hylian
Arabic
English
0
sore
0
sore
zero
       
1
hire
1
hire
one
 
10
dEme
10
d?me
ten
2
dise
2
dise
two
 
20
didEme
20
did?me
twenty
3
troe
3
troe
three
 
30
trodEme
30
trod?me
thirty
4
kose
4
kose
four
 
40
kodEme
40
kod?me
forty
5
pante
5
pante
five
 
50
pandEme
50
pand?me
fifty
6
hEnte
6
h?nte
six
 
60
hEndEme
60
h?nd?me
sixty
7
site
7
site
seven
 
70
sidEme
70
sid?me
seventy
8
onte
8
onte
eight
 
80
ondEme
80
ond?me
eighty
9
nive
9
nive
nine
 
90
nidEme
90
nid?me
ninety

When counting from zero to ten, or saying a "tens" number, simply say the number.

0
1
2
3
10
20
sore
hire
dise
troe
dEme
didEme
sore
hire
dise
troe
d?me
did?me
zero
one
two
three
ten
twenty

When counting from eleven to ninety-nine, say the "tens" number then the "ones" number.

11
12
21
22
dEme hire
dEme dise
didEme hire
didEme dise
d?me hire
d?me dise
did?me hire
did?me dise
eleven (ten one)
twelve (ten two)
twenty-one
twenty-two


 
100
sale
100
sale
(one) hundred
200
disale
200
disale
two hundred
300
trosale
300
trosale
three hundred
400
kosale
400
kosale
four hundred
500
pansale
500
pansale
five hundred
600
hEnsale
600
h?nsale
six hundred
700
sisale
700
sisale
seven hundred
800
onsale
800
onsale
eight hundred
900
nisale
900
nisale
nine hundred
1000
male
1000
male
(one) thousand

When saying a hundreds number, simply say the number.

100
200
300
400
sale
disale
trosale
kosale
sale
disale
trosale
kosale
one hundred
two hundred
three hundred
four hundred

For other numbers, say the "hundreds" number, the "tens" number, and the "ones" number.

163
579
sale hEndEme troe
pansale sidEme nive
sale h?ndeme troe
pansale sid?me nive
one hundred sixty-three
five hundred seventy-nine

Numbers greater than one thousand are slightly more complicated. For numbers greater than one thousand and less than one million, you must use the special conjunction do before the thousands number (except when it is only one thousand). Here is a formula for saying the number: thousands number (hundreds+tens+ones+do+male) + hundreds + tens + ones.

3258
troe do male disale pandEme onte
troe do male disale pand?me onte
three thousand two hundred fifty-eight

Note that Hylian places the equivalent of a period between the thousands column and the hundreds column. Essentially, Hylian places a period whenever we would use a comma.

279.851
disale sidEme nive do male onsale pandEme hire
disale sid?me nive do male onsale pand?me hire
two hundred seventy-nine thousand eight hundred fifty-one


Common Expressions

    I have compiled a list of commonly used expressions that will help you in your travels. They include greetings, salutations, and other phrases. Here are some examples.
 

oh@o
Oha?io
Hello
sajan<
Sajan???
Goodbye
vina minazi
Vina minazi
Good morning (when saying hello to someone)
vina minazini
Vina minazini
Good morning (when saying goodbye to someone)
vina tiudri
Vina tiudri
Good afternoon, good day, (when saying hello to someone)
vina tiudrini
Vina tiudrini
Good afternoon, good day (when saying goodbye to someone)
vina n@stri
Vina na?istri
Good evening, good night (when saying hello to someone)
vina n@strini
Vina na?istrini
Good evening, good night (when saying goodbye to someone)
t@ras t@u jano?
Ta?iras ta?iu jano?
How are you?
bagu t@ras vina.
Bagu ta?iras vina.
I am good (well).
naSas t@u kono?
Nashas ta?iu kono?
What is your name?
bagu naSas kasuto.
Bagu nashas Kasuto.
My name is Kasuto.
moka goeare
Moka goeare
Nice to meet you; it's my pleasure (literally: much pleasure)
edas t@u tano?
Edas ta?iu tano?
How old are you?
bagu edas dEme onte (anyEn).
Bagu edas d?me onte (any?n).
I am eighteen (years) old.
vInSas t@u dono?
V?nshas ta?iu dono?
Where do you live?
bagu vInSas ont hirule.
Bagu v?nshas ont Hirule.
I live in Hyrule.
 (moka) aroti
(Moka) Aroti
 Thanks; Thank you (very much)
dan>
Dan???
You're welcome
 skuzi
Skuzi
Excuse me, pardon me (when apologizing, passing someone) 
 skoSi
Skoshi
Excuse me (when getting someone's attention)
ati
Ati
Darn (non-vulgar expletive)
kari!
Kari!
Wow!
gomi
Gomi
Sorry, I'm sorry
yuri
Yuri
Please
h@
Ha?i
Yes
nani
Nani
No
kizo
Kizo
Maybe
kono?
Kono?
What?, Huh?
t@ras krone kwano?
Ta?iras krone kwano?
What time is it? (literally: When is [the] time?)
t@ras dEme onte Ek trodEme hire.
Ta?iras d?me onte ?k trod?me hire .
It is 11:31. (literally: it is eleven and thirty-one)

Forms of Address

 In Hylian, there is a myriad of ways to address people. Most of the time, people don't simply use a person's name. Often, they attach some kind of word to the end of the name to indicate respect, frienship, or love. This is similar to the many suffixes that Japanese uses, like "-san", "-sama", etc.

Names

  Names are the base for most forms of address. In Hylian culture, a person's first name, or "given name" is usually used. Some people have family names, but they are seldom used. Giving people a middle name is very uncommon in Hyrule, and you almost never see it.
    When saying a person's full name, the family name (surname) and first name (given name), the family name is always said first. For example: Ruzantaze Zelda. Ruzantaze is the surname of Hyrule's royal family, Zelda is the given name of the princess. Most of the time, a person's family name is only used when introducing someone. More commonly you will see a person's place of origin used instead of a family name. For example: Kasuto da?ia Katane. Kasuto is the given name, and Katane is Kasuto's place of origin, Kataan. The word da?ia means "of." For instance, Impa is from Kakariko village, so she could be addressed as Impa da?ia Kakariko. Most of the time however, people are simply addressed by their given name and a suffix. The different suffixes attached to people's names are listed below.
 

Suffix
Example
Explanation
=kumi
-kumi
kasuto'kumi
Kasuto'kumi
Used between close friends as a sign of friendship.
=kani
-kani
darunia'kani
Darunia'kani
Used for a person you respect but also consider a friend or acquaintance.
=kanO
-kano?i
kira'kanO
Kira'kano?i
Used when talking to a person you don't know, or someone you highly respect.
=aki
-aki
zelda'aki
Zelda'aki
For people you love, usually used between spouses or boyfriends and girlfriends.
=aSi
-ashi
saria'aSi
Saria'ashi
An expression of parental or brotherly love, used by parents when talking to children, or used between siblings.
=aSO
-asho?i
impa'aSO
Impa'asho?i
An expression of love an respect, similar to ashi but is used with social superiors, as in your parents, grandparents, etc.
=sEnSi
-s?nshi
sailan'sEnSi
Sailan's?nshi
A special expression used for teachers, professors, or any type of educator.
=maSta
-mashta
harikana'maSta
Harikana'mashta
This is an honorific expression, used when addressing a king or queen. It could be translated as "Your Majesty" or "Sire."
=maji
-maji
zelda'maji
Zelda'maji
An honorific used when addressing a prince, princess, or other royalty socially lower than a king or queen.
=SulO#
-shulo?i
miyamoto'SulO#
Miyamoto'shulo?i
This is used only with a person's family name. It is used for men and is equivalent to "Mister." It is rarely used.
=S;linO
-sh?lino?i
ruzantaze'S;linO
Ruzantaze'sh?lino?i
This is used only for a person's family name. It is used for women and is equivalent to "Miss" or "Mrs." It is rarely used.

    There are also stand-alone forms of address that are words by themselves and are used without names. They are generally used with stangers when you don't know their name.
 

   
kuzO
kuzo?i
Used when addressing an adult male or a male of the same age. It is equivalent to "sir."
k;zinO#
k?zino?i
Used when addressing an adult female or a female of the same age. It is equivalent to "ma'am", or "madam."
k[milO
k?milo?i
Usually used when addressing a male child. It is euivalent to "kid", or "little boy."
k[minO
k?mino?i
Usually used when addressing a female child. It is equivalent to "kid", or "little girl."


 

Expletives

    The first thing people ask when they learn a foreign language is "How do I swear?" Well, I couldn't make a language tutorial without telling you how to use some of the more vulgar expressions. Just know that I don't censor anything, so if you are offended by swear words, don't read this section. Here are some common profanities:
 

dari
dari
 Damn, dammit (not very vulgar)
aktaJ&
aktajh?
Literally "To hell" (same effect as dari)
kuso
kuso
Shit (more vulgar than dari)
(bana) dukw&
(bana) dukw? 
Fuck (very vulgar, bana makes it more forceful) 
kisame
kisame
Equivalent to "Bastard" 
kis&mine
kis?mine
Equivalent to "Bitch" (used only for women) 
krage
krage
Shit (vulgar term for feces) 
kragag
kragag
To shit (vulgar term for defecation) 
Tise
thise
Piss (vulgar term for urine) 
Tisag
thisag
To piss (vulgar term for unrination) 
dokwag
dokwag
To fuck (vulgar term for sexual intercourse) 
vene
vene
Dick, cock (vulgar term for penis) 
tonye
tonye
Pussy, cunt (vulgar term for vagina) 
darSe
darshe
Ass (vulgar term for buttocks) 
Sije, SijEn
shije, shij?n
Boob, boobs (vulgar term for a woman's breasts) 
kuje, kujEn
kuje, kuj?n
Balls, nads (vulgar term for testicles) 
 
 
Hylian to English
 
A -a

=aki -aki <o'ki:>: suffix. This is attached to a person's name to indicate love for a person. Used between spouses and boyfriends and girlfriends.

akime akime <o ki:'mei>: n. Friend.

aktaJ& aktajh? <ok" toZo'>: expletive intj. To hell, damn it. Vulgar term equivalent to "Damn it to hell."

akte akte <ok'tei>: n. Name of the first letter of the Hylian alphabet.

alba alba <oL'bo>: adj. Holy.

amkanag amkanag  <om ko'nog>: vt. To love.

amkane amkane <om ko'nei>: n. Love.

anye anye <on'yei>: n. Year.

anz anz <onz>: contraction. The, to the. Contraction of the words ank and taz.

=aSi -ashi <o'shi:>: suffix. Attached to a person's name to indicate affection. It is used by parents to children, between siblings, or between family members of the same social level (like cousins).

=aSO -asho?i <o'shoi>: suffix. Attached to a person's name to indicate affection. It is used to show both love and respect. It is used for social superiors like parents and grandparents.

ati ati <o'ti:>: intj. Darn. Used as a non-vulgar expletive.

az az <oz>: contraction. The, to the. Contraction of the words ab and taz.



? -A
Akte ?kte (ACK-tay):  n. Name of the second letter of the Hylian alphabet.

Aktriu ?ktriu (ack-TREE-ooh):  pron. Others.


A?I - ?

@te a?ite (EYE-tay):  n. Name of the third letter of the Hylian alphabet.


A?U -%

%te a?ute (OW-tay):  n. Name of the fourth letter of the Hylian alphabet.


B -b
bado bado (BAY-tay):  prep. After.

bEnkati b?nkati (benn-KAH-tee):  intj. Welcome. Usually used as a greeting or salutation. B?nkati ak taz v?lae da?ia katane ~ Welcome to the village of Kataan.

bete bete (BAY-tay):  n. Name of the fifth letter of the Hylian alphabet.

biankag biankag (bee-AHN-kahg):   1. vi. To look. To use one's eyes to view something, or to imagine something. Bagu biankis ant taz ka?iane ~ I looked at the dog. 2. vt.To seek, to look for (something).This form of the verb takes a direct object. It is used in the sense of looking for something, or seeking something. Bagu biankas ab taz veuarde ~ I seek (look for) the truth.

brinste brinste (BREEN-stay):  n. Arm.


D -d

dan> dan??? (dah-NOY): intj. You're welcome. Used in response to someone saying "aroti" or "thank you".

danre danre (DAHN-ray):  n. Money, currency.

daonkve daonkve (dah-OHNK-vay):  n. Lake. This is derived from the words da?ia meaning of and onkve meaning water.

darasune darasune (DAHR-ri): n. Star. Used to refer to a star in the sky other than the Sun.

dari dari (DAHR-ri): expletive intj. Damn, dammit. Mildly vulgar.

darSe darshe (DAHR-shay): n. Ass, butt. Mildly vulgar slang term for buttocks.

date date (DAH-tay): n. Name of the sixth letter of the Hylian alphabet.

daz daz (DAHZ): contraction. Of the. Contraction of the words da?ia and taz.

d@a da?ia (DIE-ah): prep. Of. Used to show possession or the origin of something. Used the same way as English "of". Taz v?lae da?ia katane ~ The village of Kataan.

dege dege (DAY-gay):  n. God, deity. This word can refer to any higher power or god, and is not specifically masculine or feminine.

d)gile d?gile (DAY-gee-lay): n masc. God. This  refers specifically to a male deity or god.

d)gine d?gine (DAY-gee-nay): n fem. Goddess. This  refers specifically to a female deity or goddess.

depoto depoto (day-POE-toe): prep. Before. Tells when an action happened, usually within a prepositional phrase. It happened before you arrived ~ Ru panses depoto ta?iu yovtes..

depotok depotok (day-POE-toke): adv. Before, previously. Tells when an action happened, it modifies a verb. It has happened before ~ Ru pansad depotok.

dEme d?me (DEMM-ay): n. Ten.

didEme did?me (dee-DEMM-ay): n. Twenty.

diebe diebe (dee-AY-bay): n.Thief.

disale disale (dee-SAHL-ay): n. Two hundred.

dise dise (DEE-say): n.Two.

dokwag dokwag (DOE-kwahg): expletive v. To fuck

dukw& dukw? (dooh-KWAH): expletive intj. Fuck. Extremely vulgar expression to indicate anger or dissatisfaction.
 


E -e

ete ete (AY-tay): n. Name of the seventh letter of the Hylian alphabet.


? -E

Ek ?k (ekk): conj. And.

Ent ?nt (ehnt): prep. In, on, at. This word is used to describe when something will happen, e.g. in the morning, on Tuesday, at six o'clock. It is usually found in prepositional phrases.

Ente ?nte (ENN-tay): n. Name of the eighth letter of the Hylian alphabet.


F -f

faeuire faeuire (fah-ay-ooh-EAR-ray): n.Fire.

farore farore (fah-ROR-ray): n. Farore. The goddess of courage.

fete fete (FAY-tay): n. Name of the ninth letter of the Hylian alphabet.

fElzana f?lzana (fell-ZAH-nah): adj. Happy, content.

fElzane f?lzane (fell-ZAH-nay): n. Happiness, contentment.

fire fire (FEAR-ray): n. Wind.


G -g

gante gante (GAHN-tay): n. Name of the tenth letter of the Hylian alphabet.

gorana gorana(gorr-ONN-ah): adj. Goron, goronian. Adjective that describes something of Goron origin.

gorane gorane(gorr-ONN-ay): n. Goron. A member of the Goron race.


H -H

haruke haruke (KOE-say): n. Arrow.

h@k&sule ha?ik?sule (hi-KAH-soo-lay): n. Castle.

hEndEme h?nd?me (hen-DEMM-ay): n. Sixty.

hEnsale h?nsale (hen-SAHL-ay): n. Six hundred.

hEnte h?nte (HEN-tay): n. Six. Can be the number six, or be the name of the eleventh letter of the Hylian alphabet.

hilana hilana (hee-LAHN-ah): adj. Hylian. Used to describe something of Hylian origin. Taz hilana langve ~ The Hylian language.

hilane hilane (hee-LAHN-ay): n. Hylian. A person who belongs to the Hylian race. Link ta?iras hilane ~ Link is (a) Hylian.

hipar&duse hipar?duse (hee-parr-AH-doo-say): n. Heaven, paradise.

hire hire (HEAR-ay): n. One.

hirule hirule (he-ROO-lay): n. Hyrule. The country where the Legend of Zelda takes place.

hite hite (KOE-say): n. Person. Gender-neutral term for a person.

h[tine h?tine (KOE-say): n fem. Woman, female. Gender-specific term for a woman.

h[tile h?tile (KOE-say): n masc. Man, male. Gender-specific term for a man.


I -i

ite ite (EE-tay): n. Name of the twelfth letter of the Hylian aplhabet.

itsakupande itsakupande (eet-sah-koo-PAHN-day): n. Encyclopedia.


? -I

Inte ?nte (IN-tay): n. Name of the thirteenth letter of the Hylian alphabet.
 

J -j

jete jete (JAY-tay): n. Name of the fifteenth letter of the Hylian alphabet.



JH -J
Jete jhete (ZHAY-tay): n. Name of the sixteenth letter of the Hylian alphabet.

JErdana jh?rdana (zhair-DAHN-nah): adj.Gerudo, Gerudan, Gerudian. Word describing something of Gerudo origin. Taz diebe jh?rdana ~ The Gerudo thief.

JErdane jh?rdane (zhair-DAHN-nay): n.Gerudo. A person who belongs to the Gerudo race. Taz jh?rdane ta?iras diebe ~ The Gerudo is (a) thief.



K -k

kamare kamare (kah-meet-SAH-ay): n. Moon. Used to refer specifically to Hyrule's moon, not moons of other planets.

kamitsae kamitsae (kah-meet-SAH-ay): n. Path. This can be literal or figurative, i.e. He walked on the path, or he went down the path of life.

=kani -kani (KAH-nee): suffix.  Attached to the name of a person you consider a friend or acquaintance, but you also show them respect. Usually used by young people towards adults they know.

=kan#-kano?i (KAH-noy): suffix.  Attached to the name of a person you repsect and may not know. Usually used with people you've met for the first time, or with someone you know but highly respect.

katabag katabag (KOE-say): vi & vt. To write.

katane katane (kah-TAHN-nay): n. Kataan. A village located twenty miles south of Hyrule Castle; the village Kasuto lived in.

kate kate (KAH-tay): n. Name of the seventeenth letter of the Hylian alphabet.

kaz kaz <koz>: contraction. To the. Contraction of the words ak and taz.

k@ane ka?iane (kie-AHN-ay): n. Dog. Gender neutral, can refer to either a female or male dog.

kibarag kibarag(key-BAR-ahg): v. To change.

kibare kibare(key-BAR-ay): n. Change.

kiJag kijhag (KEY-zhag): vt. To conjugate. To give a verb a subject and a tense.

kiJage kijhage (key-ZHAG-ay): n. Conjugation. The process of conjugating a verb.

k[milO#k?milo?i (KEY-me-loy):  Child, kid, little boy. A word used to address a young child without using their name. It is sometimes used as a sign of affection. Used only with male children.

k[minO#k?mino?i (KEY-me-noy):  Child, kid, little girl. A word used to address a young child without using their name. It is sometimes used as a sign of affection. Used only with female children.

kirag kirag (KEY-rahg): n. To buy, to purchase.

kisame kisame (key-SAH-may): n. Bastard, asshole. A vulgar expression used to insult someone. It would be roughly equivalent to calling someone a bastard or an asshole. Used for males.

kis&mine kis?mine (key-SAH-mee-nay): n. Bitch, asshole. A vulgar expression used to insult someone. It would be roughly equivalent to calling a woman a bitch. Used for females.

kiSoke kishoke (key-SHO-kay): n. Sword.

konktra konktra (KOHNK-trah): adj. Right, correct.

kodEme kod?me (koe-DEMM-ay): n. Forty.

kosale kosale (koe-SAHL-ay): n. Four hundred.

kose kose (KOE-say): n. Four.

kragag kragag (KRAH-gahg): v. To shit. A vulgar slang term for defecation.

krage krage (KRAH-gay): n. Shit. A vulgar slang term for feces.

kriaSag kriashag (kree-AH-shahg): vt. To create.

kriaSase kriashase (kree-ah-SHAH-say): n. Creator.

kuje kuje (KOOH-jay): n. Nads, balls. A vulgar slang term for testicles. Usually used in the plural.

=kumi -kumi (KOOH-mee): suffix.  Attached to the name of a person whom you are close friends with. It is a sign of camaraderie and bonding.

kursiye kursiye (KOE-say): n. Chair.

kuzO kuzo?i (KOOH-zoy): Sir. This is a form of address that is used without a person's name, it stands by itself. It is used to refer to a male you do not know, or a male that you respect. Equivalent to using "sir" or "mister".

k;zinO k?zino?i (KOOH-zee-noy): Madam, ma'am. This is a form of address that is used without a person's name, it stands by itself. It is used to refer to a female you do not know, or a female that you respect. Equivalent to using "ma'am", "madam", or "miss".


L -l
langve langve (LAHNG-vay): n. Language.

lErdag l?rdag (LARE-dahg): vt. To read.

lErde l?rde (LARE-day): n. Book.

lErdiSe l?rdishe (lare-DEE-shay): n. Literature.

lete lete (LAY-tay): n. Name of the eighteenth letter of the Hylian alphabet.

lo lo (low): conj. So, so that, in order to. Used to tell the reason why something is done.



M -m
male male (MAH-lay): n. Thousand.

masa masa (MAH-sah): adj. Many, a lot. Used to describe the amount of something, or an abundance of idividual units of something.

=maSta -mashta (MAHSH-tah): suffix. Sire, your majesty. Attached to the name of a king or queen as an honorific expression. It can also be used on its own to address a monarch.

=maji -maji (MAH-jee): suffix. Your higness. Attached to the name of a princess, prince, or other member of the royal peerage as an honorific expression. It can also be used on its own.

mate mate (MAH-tay): n. Name of the twentieth letter of the Hylian alphabet.

miarag miarag (mee-ARE-ahg): vt. & vi. To look, to see, to view. This is used in the sense of physically seeing something, or viewing something.

minaze minaze (me-NAH-zay): Morning. Please note that when this is used as a greeting, as in good morning, the -e ending changes to -i as in vina minazi.

minazi minazi (me-NAH-zee): Morning. This word is used when greeting someone or saying hello, as in vina minazi or good morning.

minazini minazini (me-nah-ZEE-nee): Morning. This word is used when greeting someone or saying goodbye, as in vina minazini or good morning.

m$strag mo?astrag (MAWSS-trag): vt. To show, to demonstrate.
 


N -n

nasuna nasuna (NIE-stray): adj. Dark, darkness Adjective form of  "nasune".

nasune nasune (NIE-stray): n. Dark, darkness.

n@stre na?istre (NIE-stray): n. Evening, night. When this word is used to greet someone, as in saying "good evening", the -e ending changes to an -i, vina na?istri.

n@stri na?istri (NIE-stree): Evening. This is only used to greet someone when saying hello, as in vina na?istri or good evening.

n@strini na?istrini (nie-STREE-nee): Night. This is only used to greet someone when saying goodbye, as in vina na?istrini or good night.

niatore niatore (nee-ah-TORE-ay): n. Institute.

nidEme nid?me (nee-DEMM-ay): n. Ninety.

nisale nisale (nee-SAHL-ay): n. Nine hundred.

nive nive (NEE-vay): n. Nine.

nImSe n?mshe (NIMM-shay): n. Number.

note note (NO-tay): n. Name of the twenty-first letter of the Hylian alphabet.



O -o
ondEme ond?me (own-DEMM-ay): n. Eighty.

onsale onsale (own-SAHL-ay): n. Eight hundred.

ont ont (ownt): prep. In, on, at. Used to tell where something will happen, e.g in the house, on the patio, at Kasuto's house. Usually part of a prepositional phrase.

onte onte(OWN-tay): n. Eight.

opJe opjhe (OPE-zhay): n. Eye.

ote ote (OH-tay): n. Name of the twenty-second letter of the Hylian alphabet.



P -p
pandEme pand?me (pahn-DEMM-ay): n. Fifty.

panktag panktag (PAHNK-tahg): vt. Can, to be able to. Describes what someone is physically or mentally capable of doing. I can read ~ Bagu panktas ab l?rdag.

pansag pansag (PAHN-sahg): vi. To happen.

pansale pansale (pahn-SAHL-ay): n. Five hundred.

pante pante (PAHN-tay): n. Five.

pate pate (PAH-tay): n. Name of the twenty-fourth letter of the Hylian alphabet.

piante piante (pee-ON-tay): n. Parent. General term for a parent, does not specifically refer to a mother or a father.

pi&ntile pi?ntile (pee-ON-tee-lay): n. Father.

pi&ntine pi?ntine (pee-ON-tee-nay): n. Mother.

poedre poedre (poe-AY-dray): n. Power.


R -r
rote rote (ROE-tay): n. Name of the twenty-fifth letter of the Hylian alphabet.

riu riu (REE-ooh)

ru ru (rooh):  neut. pron. It, he/she. This pronoun is used in the same way as "it" is in English. The word can represent something that is neither masculine nor feminine, something whose gender is unclear, an object, or a person whose gender is unknown. Ru is also equivalent to today's usage of he/she.

ruzantaze ruzantaze (rooh-zahn-TAH-zay):  proper n. Ruzantaze.This is the family name of Hyrule's royal family.



S -s
sale sale (SAHL-ay): n. Hundred.

sate sate (SAH-tay): n. Name of the twenty-sixth letter of the Hylian alphabet.

=sEnshi -s?nshi (SENN-she):  suffix. Teacher, master.This is only used when attached to a person's name. It is a sign of respect for a teacher, doctor, professor, or other type of educator.

siafire siafire (see-ah-FEAR-ray): n. Sapphire. A blue precious stone.

sidEme sid?me (see-DEMM-ay): n. Seventy.

sikwala sikwala (see-KWAHL-ah): adj. Silent, quiet.

sikwale sikwale (see-KWAHL-ay): n. Silence, quietness.

sikwalok sikwalok (see-KWAHL-oke): adv. Silently, quietly.

sisale sisale (see-SAHL-ay): n. Seven hundred.

site site (SEE-tay): n. Seven.

sIlrag s?lrag (SILL-rahg): vi. To leave.

sore sore (SORE-ay): n. Zero.



SH -S
Sa sha (shah): super-imperative adjunct. This gives the verb a meaning of necessity. It tells what someone must do. See verb section.

S@ sha.i (shy): subjunctive adjunct. This gives the verb a subjunctive meaning. It is equivalent to the English might or may, as in I might go home. See verb section.

Se she (shay): imperative adjunct. This gives the verb an imperative meaning, that is less forceful than the super-imperative adjunct. It is equivalent to the English use of should or ought to. See verb section.

Sekana shekana (shay-KAH-nah): adj. Sheikah, Sheikan. This word describes someone or something of Sheikah origin.

Sekane shekane (shay-KAH-nay): n. Sheikah. A member of the Sheikah race.

SEmse sh?mse (shay-KAH-nay): n. Sun. This word is the name used for the Sun. It refers only to the sun of their planet, not to a general star.

Si shi (shee): progressive adjunct. This gives the verb a progressive meaning. It is equivalent to the English use of the verb to be + the present participle of a verb, e.g. I am reading. See verb section.

Sije shije (SHEE-jay): n. Boobs, breasts. A vulgar slang term for a woman's breasts. Usually used in the plural.

Siu shiu (SHEE-ooh): passive adjunct. This gives the verb a passive meaning. It gives the subject of a sentence the meaning of having the action performed upon it, e.g. The book was read as opposed to I read the book. See verb section.

SInte sh?nte (SHINN-tay): n. Name of the twenty-sixth letter of the Hylian alphabet.

So sho (show): imperfect adjunct. This gives the verb an imperfect meaning. It is equivalent to the English use of used to. It tells about something that occurred in the past, but occurred at no specific time. See verb section.

SO sho.i (shoy): conditional adjunct. This gives the verb a conditional meaning. It is equivalent to the English would, as in I would buy this if I had enough money. See verb section.

Su shu (shoo): conditional ability adjunct. This tells the the subject is able to do something, but there is some doubt behind it. It is equivalent to the English use of the word could, as in I could go if I wanted to.  See verb section.

Sh;linO sh?lino.i (SHOO-lee-noy): suffix. Mrs. Ms., miss. This word is attached to a person's family name, and is equivalent to using "Mrs.", "Miss", or "Ms."

ShulO shulo.i (SHOO-loy): suffix. Mister. This word is attached to a person's family name, and is equivalent to using "mister".


T - t

taro taro (TAR-oh): conj. So, so that, in order to. Synonymous with lo.

taz taz (tahz): def article. The. Definite article, used the same way as English "the". Does not change with gender or plurality. Taz hilane ~ The Hylian; Taz hilan?n ~ The Hylians.

t@rag ta.irag (TIE-rahg): vl. To be. Used in much the same way as the English "be". Used to express a state of being or as a linking verb. This is its unconjugated form.

tEnSag t?nshag (TEN-shahg): n. To have, to possess.

tInske t?nske (TIN-skay): n. Task, work.

toere toere (toe-AIR-ay): n. World.

toka toka (TOE-kah): adj. All, all of.

tonye tonye (TONE-yay): n. Pussy, cunt. An extremely vulgar slang term for vagina.

torimag torimag (tore-EE-mahg): v. To end, to finish, to compete.

t$te to.ate (TAW-tay): n. Name of the twenty-third letter of the Hylian alphabet.

trodEme trod?me (troe-DEMM-ay): n. Thirty.

troe troe (TROW-ay): n. Three.

trofaSe trofashe (troe-FAHSH-ay): n. Triforce.

trosale trosale (trow-SAHL-ay): n. Three hundred.


TH -T

Tate thate (THAH-tay): n. Name of the twenty-seventh letter of the Hylian alphabet.


U -u

uniag uniag (ooh-NEE-ahg): vt. To unite, to join.

uSikag ushikag(ooh-SHE-kahg): v. To conquer.

uSikage ushikage(ooh-she-KAHG-ay): n. Conquest.

ute ute (OOH-tay): n. Name of the twenty-ninth letter of the Hylian alphabet.


? -U

Unte ?nte (UNN-tay): n. Name of the thirtieth letter of the Hylian alphabet

V -v

vakonktra vakonktra (vah-KOHNK-trah): adj. Righteous.

v@sag va?isag (VIE-sahg): v. To watch, to watch over, to supervise.

vene vene (VAY-nay): n. Dick, cock. An extremely vulgar term for penis.

vete vete (VAY-tay): n. Name of the thirty-first letter of the Hylian alphabet.

veuarda veudarda (vay-ooh-ARE-dah): adj. True. Adjective that describes something that is true. Ru ta?iras veuarda ~ It is true.

veuarde veudarde (vay-ooh-ARE-day): n. Truth.

viseEre vise?re (vee-say-AIR-ray): n. Wizard.


W -w

wante wante (WAHN-tay): n. Name of the thirty-second letter of the Hylian alphabet.

wirte wirte (WEER-tay): n. Verb. The part of speech that expresses action.

witag witag (WEE-tahg): v. To guide.

woeka woeka (woe-AY-kah): v. Wise.

woeke woeke (woe-AY-kay): n. Wisdom.


Y -y

yaz yaz (yahz): prep. Already.

yovtag yovtag (YOVE-tahg): v. To arrive.


Z -z

zante zante (ZAHN-tay): n. Name of the thirty-fourth letter of the Hylian alphabet.

zoEra zo?ra(zoe-AIR-ah): adj. Zora, Zoran. Word describing something of the Zoras. Taz zo?ra siafire ~ The Zora Sapphire.

zoEre zo?re (zoe-AIR-ay): n. Zora, Zoran. A person of the Zoran race.

 

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