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"Controlling the Human Mind: The Technologies of Political Control or Tools for Peak Performance"

Dr. Nick Begich's new book, "Controlling the Human Mind: The Technologies of Political Control or Tools for Peak Performance" (ISBN: 1-890693-54-5) is now available.  It can be purchased from Earthpulse Press at www.earthpulse.com for $18.00.  He covers the gamut of all of these Directed Energy technologies. 



Death by Taser: The Killer Alternative to Guns

By Silja J.A. Talvi, In These Times

Posted November 18, 2006, Printed November 18, 2006

http://www.alternet.org/story/44455/
Editor's note: This article is especially relevant given the recent unwarranted and brutal taser attack on a UCLA student.

Taser International Inc. maintains that its stun-guns are "changing the world and saving lives everyday." There is no question that they changed Jack Wilson's life. On Aug. 4, in Lafayette, Colo., policemen on a stakeout approached Jack's son Ryan as he entered a field of a dozen young marijuana plants. When Ryan took off running, officer John Harris pursued the 22-year-old for a half-mile and then shot him once with an X-26 Taser. Ryan fell to the ground and began to convulse. The officer attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation, but Ryan died.

According to his family and friends, Ryan was in very good physical shape. The county coroner found no evidence of alcohol or drugs in his system and ruled that Ryan's death could be attributed to the Taser shock, physical exertion from the chase and the fact that one of his heart arteries was unusually small.

In October, an internal investigation cleared Officer Harris of any wrongdoing and concluded that he had used appropriate force.

Wilson says that while his son had had brushes with the law as a juvenile and struggled financially, he was a gentle and sensitive young man who always looked out for his disabled younger brother's welfare, and was trying to better his job prospects by becoming a plumber's apprentice.

"Ryan was not a defiant kid," says his father. "I don't understand why the cop would chase him for a half-mile, and then 'Tase' him while he had an elevated heart rate. If [the officer] hadn't done that, we know that he would still be alive today."

Ryan is one of nearly 200 people who have died in the last five years after being shot by a Taser stun gun. In June, the U.S. Department of Justice announced that it would review these deaths.

Over the same period, Taser has developed a near-monopoly in the market for non-lethal weaponry. Increasingly, law enforcement officials use such weapons to subdue society's most vulnerable members: prisoners, drug addicts and the mentally ill, along with "passive resisters," like the protesters demonstrating against Florida Governor Jeb Bush's attendance of a Rick Santorum fundraiser in Pittsburgh on Oct. 9.

Taser has built this monopoly through influence peddling, savvy public relations and by hiring former law enforcement and military officers -- including one-time Homeland Security chief hopeful, Bernard Kerik. And now that questions are being raised about the safety of Taser weaponry, the company is fighting back with legal and marketing campaigns.

Birth of a Taser

In 1974, a NASA scientist named Jack Cover invented the first stun gun, which he named the TASER, or "Thomas A. Swift Electric Rifle," after Tom Swift, a fictional young inventor who was the hero of a series of early 20th century adventure novels. Because it relied on gunpowder, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms classified Tasers as registered firearms.

That changed in the early '90s. According to Taser's corporate creation story, co-founder Rick Smith became interested in the device after friends of his "were brutally murdered by an angry motorist." Smith contacted Cover in the hopes of bringing the Taser as a self-defense weapon to a larger market. In 1993, with money from Smith's brother Tom, they created Air Taser Inc., which would later become Taser International Inc. When Tasers were re-engineered to work with a nitrogen propellant rather than gunpowder, the weapon was no longer categorized as a firearm. The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department adopted the guns, but they were not widely embraced by other departments.

Taser's fortunes improved in 1998, after the company embarked on a new development program, named "Project Stealth." The goal was to streamline stun gun design and deliver enough voltage to stop "extremely combative, violent individuals," especially those who couldn't be controlled by non-lethal chemicals like mace.

Out of Project Stealth, the Advanced Taser was born. When the weapon premiered in 2000 -- a model eventually redesigned as the M-26 -- the company brought on a cadre of active and retired military and law enforcement personnel to vouch for the weapon's efficacy. The new spokespersons ranged from Arizona SWAT members to a former Chief Instructor of hand-to-hand combat for the U.S. Marine Corps.

Taser began to showcase the Advanced Taser at technology-related conventions throughout North America and Europe, billing it as a non-lethal weapon that could take down even the toughest adversary. Soon to be among those "dangerous" opponents were the protesters assembling in Philadelphia for the 2000 Republican National Convention.

By the following year, 750 law enforcement agencies had either tested or deployed the weapon. Today, more than 9,500 law enforcement, correctional and military agencies in 43 countries use Taser weaponry. In the past eight years, more than 184,000 Tasers have been sold to law enforcement agencies, with another 115,000 to citizens in the 43 states where it is legal to possess a stun gun.

When the electricity hits

Taser's stun guns are designed to shoot a maximum of 50,000 volts into a person's body through two compressed nitrogen-fueled probes, thereby disrupting the target's electromuscular system. The probes are connected to the Taser gun by insulated wires, and can deliver repeat shocks in quick succession. The probes can pierce clothing and skin from a distance or be directly applied to a person's body -- a process known as "dry stunning" -- for an ostensibly less-incapacitating, cattle-prod effect.

"The impetus for Tasers came from the often community-led search for 'less-than-lethal' police weapons," explains Norm Stamper, former chief of the Seattle Police Department and author of Breaking Rank. "[There were] too many questionable or bad police shootings, and cops saying, correctly, that there are many ambiguous situations where a moment's hesitation could lead to their own deaths or the death of an innocent other."

According to Taser's promotional materials, its stun guns are designed to "temporarily override the nervous system [and take] over muscular control." People who have experienced the effect of a Taser typically liken it to a debilitating, full-body seizure, complete with mental disorientation and loss of control over bodily functions.

Many Taser-associated deaths have been written up by coroners as being attributable to "excited delirium," a condition that includes frenzied or aggressive behavior, rapid heart rate and aggravating factors related to an acute mental state and/or drug-related psychosis. When such suspects are stunned, especially while already being held down or hogtied, deaths seem to occur after a period of "sudden tranquility," as Taser explains in its CD-ROM training material entitled, "Sudden Custody Death: Who's Right and Who's Wrong." In that same material, the company warns officers to "try to minimize the appearance of mishandling suspects."

Taser did not respond to requests for an interview. But its press and business-related statements have consistently echoed the company's official position: "TASER devices use proprietary technology to quickly incapacitate dangerous, combative or high-risk subjects who pose a risk to law enforcement officers, innocent citizens or themselves." Another brochure, specifically designed for law enforcement, clearly states that the X26 has "no after effects."

Ryan Wilson's family can attest otherwise, as can many others.

Casualties and cruelties

In the span of three months -- July, August and September -- Wilson's Taser-related death was only one among several. Larry Noles, 52, died after being stunned three times on his body (and finally on his neck) after walking around naked and "behaving erratically." An autopsy found no drugs or alcohol in his system. Mark L. Lee, 30, was suffering from an inoperable brain tumor and having a seizure when a Rochester, N.Y., police officer stunned him. In Cookeville, Ala., 31-year-old Jason Dockery was stunned because police maintain he was being combative while on hallucinogenic mushrooms. Family members believe he was having an aneurysm. And Nickolos Cyrus, a 29-year-old man diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, was shocked 12 times with a Taser stun gun after a Mukwonago, Wis., police officer caught him trespassing on a home under construction. An inquest jury has already ruled that the officer who shot Cyrus -- who was delusional and naked from the waist down when he was stunned -- was within his rights to act as he did.

Although the company spins it otherwise, Taser-associated deaths are definitely on the rise. In 2001, Amnesty International documented three Taser-associated deaths. The number has steadily increased each year, peaking at 61 in 2005. So far almost 50 deaths have occurred in 2006, for an approximate total of 200 deaths in the last five years.

Amnesty International and other human rights groups have also drawn attention to the use of Tasers on captive populations in hospitals, jails and prisons.

In fact, the first field tests relating to the efficacy of the "Advanced Taser" model in North America were conducted on incarcerated men. In December 1999, the weapon was used, with "success," against a Clackamas County (Ore.) Jail inmate. The following year, the first-ever Canadian use of an Advanced Taser was by the Victoria Police, on an inmate in psychiatric lockdown. Since that time, Taser deployment in jails and prisons has become increasingly commonplace, raising concerns about violations of 8th Amendment prohibitions against cruel and unusual punishment.

This summer, the ACLU of Colorado filed a class action suit on behalf of prisoners in the Garfield County Jail, where jail staff have allegedly used Tasers and electroshock belts, restraint chairs, pepper spray and pepperball guns as methods of torture. According to Mark Silverstein, legal director for ACLU of Colorado, inmates have told him that Tasers are pulled out and "displayed" by officers on a daily basis, either as a form of intimidation and threat compliance, or to shock the inmates for disobeying orders.

A recent report from the ACLU's National Prison Project (NPP), "Abandoned and Abused: Orleans Parish Prisoners in the Wake of Hurricane Katrina," concerns the plight of the estimated 6,500 New Orleans prisoners left to fend for themselves in the days after the monumental New Orleans flood. The NPP's Tom Jawetz says that the organization has been looking into abuses at Orleans Parish Prison (OPP) since 1999, but that the incidents that took place in jails and prisons in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina were unprecedented.

Take the case of New Orleans resident Ivy Gisclair. Held at OPP for unpaid parking tickets, Gisclair was about to be released on his own recognizance when Hurricane Katrina hit. After languishing with thousands of other prisoners in a flooded jail, Gisclair was sent to the Bossier Parish Maximum Security Prison. Once there, Gisclair apparently had the nerve to inquire about being held past his release date. Gisclair has testified that he was then restrained and stunned repeatedly with a Taser, before being thrown, naked and unconscious, into solitary confinement.

"I can't imagine any justification for that," says Jawetz. "[Prison guards] were kicking, beating and 'Tasing' him until he lost consciousness. A line was crossed that should never have been crossed."

In March, Reuben Heath, a handcuffed and subdued Montana inmate, was shocked while lying prone in his bed. The deputy involved -- a one-time candidate for sheriff -- now faces felony charges.

Gisclair and Heath are among the inmates who have survived in-custody incidents involving the abuse of Tasers. Others haven't been as fortunate. This year alone, those who have died in custody in the aftermath of being stunned by Tasers include Arapahoe County Jail (Colorado) inmate Raul Gallegos-Reyes, 34, who was strapped to a restraint chair and stunned; Jerry Preyer, 45, who suffered from a severe mental illness in an Escambia County, Fla., jail and was shocked twice by a Taser; and Karl Marshall, 32, who died in Kansas City police custody two hours after he was stunned with PCP and crack cocaine in his system.

Appropriate uses

"We are seeing far too many cases where Tasers are not being used for their intended purposes," says Sheley Secrest, president of NAACP Seattle. "And many of these cases don't end up getting reported or properly investigated because people are so humiliated by the experience."

Former U.S. Marshal Matthew Fogg, a long-time SWAT specialist and vice president of Blacks in Government, says that if stun guns are going to be used by law enforcement, training on their use should be extensive, and that the weapons should also be placed high up on what police officers call the "use-of-force continuum."

Fogg isn't alone in calling for such measures. In October 2005, the Police Executive Research Forum, an influential police research and advocacy group, recommended that law enforcement only be allowed to use Tasers on people aggressively resisting arrest. The organization also recommended that law enforcement officers needed to step back and evaluate the condition of suspects after they had been shocked once. Similar recommendations were included in an April 2005 report from the International Association of Chiefs of Police. That report also urged police departments to evaluate whether certain vulnerable groups -- including the mentally ill -- should be excluded altogether from being shot with Tasers.

Although Fogg's organization has called for an outright ban of Tasers until further research can be conducted, Fogg says that he knows responsible members of law enforcement are perfectly capable of using the weapons effectively. Officers who are willing to put their lives on the line for the sake of the community, he emphasizes, must be given the tools and training to be able to minimize harm to themselves and to others.

Fogg, who also serves on the board of Amnesty International USA, says that too many members of law enforcement seem to be using them as compliance mechanisms. "It's something along the lines of, 'If I don't like you, I can torture you,' " he says.

Some law enforcement agencies have already implemented careful use policies, including the San Francisco Sheriff's Department, which selectively hands out Tasers to carefully trained deputies. The department also prohibits use of Tasers on subjects already "under control." According to Sheriff Michael Hennessey, deputies are not allowed to use stun guns in response to minor ineffectual threats, as a form of punishment, or on juveniles or pregnant women. Within the department, stun guns are purposely set to turn off after five seconds. Additionally, every use of the weapon in a jail facility must be videotaped.

"I authorize Tasers to be used on people who are at high risk of hurting themselves or deputies," Sheriff Hennessey emphasizes. "Without options like these, the inmate and the deputies are much more likely to get seriously hurt."

But when stun guns are used on people who don't fit that criteria, Secrest says, the public should be asking serious questions about the efficacy of Taser use, particularly because of the emotional trauma related to Taser-related take-downs.

"When a person comes into our office after they've been [Tased], it's not as much the physical pain they talk about as much as the humiliation, the disrespect," she says. "The people [who are stunned by these guns] talk about not being able to move, and thinking that they were going to die."

As for actual Taser-associated deaths, Secrest believes that they should be investigated just as thoroughly as deaths involving firearms. Instead, Taser injuries and deaths are typically justified because officers report that the suspect was resisting an arrest.

"That's the magic word: 'resisted,'" says Secrest. "Any kind of police oversight investigation tends to end right there." Capitalizing on 9/11

Despite these concerns, Taser International Inc. has thrived. The 9/11 terrorist attacks sent the company's profits soaring. Many domestic and international airlines -- as well a variety of major law enforcement agencies -- were eager to acquire a new arsenal of weapons. Homeland Security money flooded into both state and federal-level departments, many of which were gung-ho to acquire a new arsenal of high-tech gadgets.

In 2002, Taser brought on former New York police commissioner Bernard Kerik as the company's director. Kerik had attained popularity in the wake of 9/11 as a law-and-order-minded hero; the company had seemingly picked one of the best spokespersons imaginable.

With Kerik's help, company's profits grew to $68 million in 2004, up from just under $7 million in 2001, and stockholders were able to cash in, including the Smith family, who raked in $91.5 million in just one fiscal quarter in 2004.

Unbeknownst to most stockholders, however, sales have been helped along by police officers who have received payments and/or stock options from Taser to serve as instructors and trainers. (The exact number of officers on the payroll is unknown because the company declines to identify active-duty officers who have received stock options.)

The recruitment of law enforcement has been crucial to fostering market penetration. For instance, Sgt. Jim Halsted of the Chandler, Ariz., Police Department, joined Taser President Rick Smith in making a presentation to the Chandler city council in March 2003. He made the case for arming the entire police patrol squad with M-26 Tasers. According to the Associated Press, Halsted said, "No deaths are attributed to the M-26 at all."

The council approved a $193,000 deal later that day.

As it turned out, Halsted was already being rewarded with Taser stock options as a member of the company's "Master Instructor Board." Two months after the sale, Halsted became Taser's Southwest regional sales manager.

In addition, Taser has developed a potent gimmick to sell its futuristic line of weapons. In 2003, Taser premiered the X-26. According to Taser's promotional materials, the X-26 features an enhanced dataport to help "save officer's careers from false allegations" by recording discharge date and time, number and length and date of discharges, and the optional ability to record the event with the Taser webcam. The X-26 also boasts a more powerful incapacitation rating of 105 "Muscular Disruption Units", up from 100 MDU's for the M-26.

The X-26 is apparently far more pleasing to the eye. As Taser spokesperson Steve Tuttle told a law enforcement trade journal, "It's a much sexier-looking product."

Lawsuits jolt Taser

As increasing numbers of police departments obtained Taser stun guns, the weapons started to be deployed against civilians with greater frequency.

Many of the civilian Taser-associated incidents have resulted in lawsuits, most of which have either been dismissed or settled out of court. But there have been a few exceptions.

In late September, Kevin Alexander, 29, was awarded $82,500 to settle an excessive force federal lawsuit after being shocked 17 times with a Taser by a New Orleans Parish police officer. The department's explanation: the shocks were intended to make him cough up drugs he had allegedly swallowed.

One recently settled Colorado case involved Christopher Nielsen, 37, who was "acting strangely" and was not responsive to police orders after he crashed his car. For his disobedience, he was stunned five times. When it was revealed that Nielsen was suffering from seizures, the county settled the case for $90,000.

An Akron, Ohio, man also recently accepted a $35,000 city settlement. One day in May 2005, he had gone into diabetic shock and police found him slumped over his steering wheel. Two officers proceeded to physically beat, Mace and Taser him after he did not respond to orders to get out of the car.

Taser's lack of response to the misuse of the company's weapons is troubling. The company relentlessly puts a positive spin on Taser use, most recently with a "The Truth is Undeniable" Web ad campaign, which contrasts mock courtroom scenes with the fictionalized, violent antics of civilians that prompt police to stungun them.

The campaign involves print ads, direct mail DVDs and online commercials that "draw attention to a rampant problem in this country: false allegations against law enforcement officers," according to Steve Ward, Taser's vice president of marketing.

"We're going to win"

The lawsuits have scared off some investors, making Taser's stock extremely volatile over the years. But press coverage of the company this past summer largely centered around Taser's "successes" in the courtroom. In addition to settling a $21.8 million shareholder lawsuit revolving around allegations that the company had exaggerated the safety of their product (they admitted no wrongdoing), Taser has triumphed in more than 20 liability dismissals and judgments in favor of the company. And the company's finances are on the upswing: Third-quarter 2006 revenues increased nearly 60 percent.

Regardless, CEO Rick Smith claims his company is target of a witchhunt. "We're waiting for people to dunk me in water and see if I float," is how he put it during a March 2005 debate with William Schulz, the executive director of Amnesty International USA.

Last year, with 40 new lawsuits filed against it, Taser dedicated $7 million in its budget to defending the company's reputation and "brand equity." The company has also gone on the offense, hiring two full-time, in-house litigators.

At one point, Taser hinted that it might sue Amnesty International for taking a critical position regarding Taser-associated injuries and deaths. In November 2004 Smith announced that the company's legal team had begun a "comprehensive review of AI's disparaging and unsupported public statements [to] advise me as to various means to protect our company's good name."

In one of the company's brashest legal maneuvers to date, Taser sued Gannett Newspapers for libel in 2005. The lawsuit alleged USA Today "sensationalized" the power of Taser guns by inaccurately reporting that the electrical output of the gun was more than 100 times that of the electric chair. This past January, a judge threw the case out, saying that the error in the article was not malicious, and that the story was protected by the First Amendment.

The company remains unwavering and aggressively protective, even as Taser-associated deaths mount each month. As Smith told the Associated Press in February, "If you're coming to sue Taser, bring your game face, strap it on and let's go. We're gonna win."

From Jack Wilson's standpoint, citizens are the real losers. His son Ryan lost his life in a situation that could have been handled any number of other ways, and no amount of legal posturing can bring Ryan back.

"I still can't believe my son is gone," he says. "The fact is that these Tasers can be lethal. No matter how they're categorized, Tasers shouldn't be treated as toys."

Thanks to the Nation Institute's Investigative Fund for research support, and to David Burnett for research assistance.

Silja J.A. Talvi is a senior editor at In These Times. Her work appears in the anthology, "Prison Nation" (Routledge, 2003).

Learn more:  See  http://www.alternet.org


TETRA: Mind Control and Microwave Human Effects


Mind Control & Microwaves

TETRA System- Feb 5th, 2001

The new Home Office microwave system called TETRA is to be the mainstay of British police force communications and will be placed in every major population centre. The British Government is spending 2 1/2 billion pounds on a 400 MHz pulse modulated microwave transmitter network which broadcasts 17.6 Hz into the brains of all Britain's police and anyone living near the planned 30,000 transmitters.

The first place these transmitters will be deployed is Glastonbury, Somerset. The effects of these transmitters, which entirely duplicate CIA research in optimal mind-control technology, are;

1. Destruction of short and long-term memory by disrupting calcium reflux from synapses, due to the effect of the 17.6 Hz ELF.
2. Disruption of synaptic neural networks, leading to behavioural and character changes.
3. manic behaviour, followed by nervous exhaustion after use, or exposure.
4. Disruption of higher brain function, leading to the so called 'zombification'.
5. Enhanced suggestibility.
6. The development of pre-cancerous cells, which can lead to long-term tumour growth.
7. Effects on the Limbic System, leading to emotional and behavioural modification.
8. ELF frequency in the TETRA system strongly affects calcium ions, causing them to efflux out of brain cells due to psychotron resonance.

Since these ions are the chief factor in long and short term potentiation of synapses, the braincell junctions, and are crucial to memory and cognition. Use of the TETRA system on such a scale could cause irreversible brain damage by disturbing not only calcium ions but sodium and potassium ions, all vital to nerve and brain function.
The TETRA system will also flood the New York and London Underground, so commuters will regularly be exposed to behavioural modification during Rush Hour. Source: TV CH4 News, UK



This article illustrates the national "coverup" that is being perpetrated by the FBI, CIA, local police….Evidence abounds that these same weapons are being used on dissidents globally.
 
MICROWAVING IRAQ
" Pacifying" Rays Pose New Hazards To Iraqis

By William Thomas 01/24/05 (World Exclusive )

Preface

Desperate to improve images of civilian carnage, US commanders are using portable electromagnetic-frequency weapons in Fallujah and other "hot spots" in the Sunni Triangle to pacify restive neighborhoods with invisible EM radiation. "Active Denial" antenna arrays mounted on Humvees are also being deployed to panic and disperse hostile crowds by flash-burning exposed flesh with microwaves. But unintended side effects from the hidden rooftop transmitters are reportedly triggering violent attacks by exposed insurgents¡ªwhile leading to AWOL rates of up to 15% among US forces disoriented by these same weapons, as well as the electromagnetic emanations from high-power radars, radios and "jammers".

On the rooftop of a shrapnel-pocked building in the ruins of Fallujah, a team of GI¡¯s stealthily sets up a gray plastic dome about two-feet in diameter. Keeping well back from the sight lines of the street and nearby buildings, they plug the cable connectors on the side of the "popper" into a power unit. The grunts have no clue what the device does. They are just following orders.

" Most of the worker-bees that are placing these do not even know what is inside the ¡®domes¡¯, just that they were told where to place them by Intel weenies with usually no nametag," reports my source, a very well informed combat veteran I will call "Hank".

" Intel" stands for "intelligence" officers who target the most restive neighborhoods in a country gripped by anarchy and chaos. The lack of nametags indicates membership in a spooky "alphabet agency", either within or outside the military chain of command. Similar "black: teams removed "Made In The USA" chemical weapons from Iraqi trenches after Desert Storm. [Bringing The War Home by William Thomas]

The grunts call the plastic devices "poppers" or "domes". Once activated, each hidden transmitter emits a widening circle of invisible energy capable of passing through metal, concrete and human skulls up to half a mile away. "They are saturating the area with ULF, VLF and UHF freqs," Hanks says, with equipment derived from US Navy undersea sonar and communications.

But its not being used to locate and talk to submarines under Baghdad.

After powering up the unit, the grunts quickly exit the area. It is their commanders¡¯ fervent hope that any male survivors enraged by brutal American bombardments that damaged virtually every building in this once thriving "City of Mosques", displacing a quarter-million residents while murdering thousands of children, women and elders in their homes¡ªwill lose all incentive for further resistance and revenge.
A dedicated former soldier, whose experiences during and after Desert Storm are chronicled in my book, Bringing The War Home, Hank stays in close touch with his unit serving "in theater" in Iraq. When I asked how many "poppers" are being used to irradiate Iraqi neighborhoods, he checked and got back to me. There are "at least 25 of these that have been deployed to theater, and used. Some have conked out and been removed, so I do not know how many are currently active and broadcasting."

As a patriotic American, Hank believes that wars must be fought by the rules he was taught and the principles his country stands for. Like many Desert Storm veterans, he would like to get his hands on retired General Norman Schwartzkopf, who covered up combat log reports of confirmed chemical weapons exposures during that 1990-¡®91 conflict. Veterans say Schwartzkopf¡¯s "treason"¡ªto use their word¡ªwas largely responsible for more than the officially admitted 12,000 deaths, and 200,000 Gulf War Illness casualties among returning GIs. [Bringing The War Home by William Thomas]

Now Hank wants to warn his comrades that they are again at grave risk from radioactive heavy metal particles inhaled form microscopic depleted uranium debris. Be careful around Najaf, he adds, where mustard agents from Desert Storm and Saddam¡¯s post-war repression still linger. Having been there, Hank concurs with historians who concluded that the Shia and Kurdish revolts would have brought down Saddam¡¯s regime if Bush Sr. had not allowed the dictator¡¯s gunships to fly against the uprisings he encouraged.

Hank is still losing friends in Iraq, where front-line soldiers put their current casualty figures from all causes¡ªcombat, accidents, psychological crackups and suicides¡ªat 5,000 dead and 22,000 to 30,000 injured.
But these GIs volunteered to extract "payback" against a country many were falsely told was responsible for the 9/11 attacks. Iraq¡¯s traumatized children want only to grow up with their families and play with their friends in the suburbs. Hank blames those at the top for hospital counts of upwards of 65,000 children killed since the 2003 invasion.

He is also concerned that innocent Iraqi families and unsuspecting GIs alike are being used as test subjects for a new generation of "psychotronic" weapons using invisible beams across the entire electromagnetic spectrum to selectively alter moods, behavior and bodily processes. "Bottom line," Hanks says about the poppers, "they are very powerful transmitters, have multi-channel/frequency send/receive multi-task capabilities, are being placed inside the area(s) where people live without their knowing it "

The Air Force and Navy have been working for decades on beam weapons that can just as easily be turned against Americans at home.

" The ¡®poppers¡¯ are capable of using a combo of ULF, VLF, UHF and EHF wavelengths in any combination at the same time, sometimes using one as a carrier wave for the others," Hank explains, in a process called superheterodyning. The silent frequencies daily sweeping Fallujah and other trouble spots are the same Navy "freqs that drove whales nuts and made them go astray onto beaches."

The Gulf War veteran observes that occupied Iraq has become a "saturation environment" of electromagnetic radiation. Potentially lethal electromagnetic smog from high-power US military electronics and experimental beam weapons is placing already hard-hit local populations¨C-particularly children¡ªat even higher risk of experiencing serious illness, suicidal depression, impaired cognitive ability, even death.

American troops constantly exposed "up close" to their own microwave transmitters, battlefield radars and RF weapons are also seeing their health eroded by electromagnetic sickness. It¡¯s common, Hank recalls, for GIs to warm themselves on cold desert nights by basking in the microwaves radiating from their QUEEMS communications and RATT radar rigs

<snip>


The same communications breakdowns occurred between units during the long drive to Baghdad along "ambush alley". The solution is to use up to 50 Humvees scattered in line-of-sight across the flat desert sands as "retransmit" stations to relay messages to distant units. Humvee and backpack-mounted SINGARS are also used extensively in Iraq¡¯s urban areas. The result: constant and pervasive electromagnetic pollution that interferes with cellular processes in human brains and bodies.

Constant microwave emissions from ground-sweeping RATT rigs and SINGARS mobile microwave networks are much more powerful than civilian microwave cell phone nets linked in many clinical studies to maladies ranging from asthma, cataracts, headaches, memory loss, early Alzheimer¡¯s, bad dreams and cancer.

Even more powerful US military radars, radios and "jammers" blasting from ground bases and overflying aircraft add to this electromagnetic din.

Like ocean waves "piggy-backing" into rogue giants, harmonic waves from this storm of randomly intersecting frequencies cause unintended power spikes, while creating new wavelengths of woe never before encountered by anyone on Earth.

This is bad enough. But this is also Iraq, Hank says, where ever-present sand acts as miniature quartz reflectors, unpredictably amplifying the ricocheting electronic smog so thick that if it were visible, every vehicle in Baghdad and the surrounding Sunni Triangle would be driving blind with their headlights on.

THE GIFT THAT KEEPS ON GIVING
This is grim news to friend and foe alike¡ªalready overloaded by constant adrenal stress, waterborne pollutants, infectious sand fleas, dehydration, pharmaceutical drugs and exposure to radioactive Uranium-238 fired in "hose ¡®em down" exuberance by US ground and air cannons and cruise missiles.

As Hank puts it, DU is "the gift that keeps on giving." For the next four billion years, medical investigators say, large populated expanses of Kosovo, Afghanistan, Puerto Rico and Iraq will remain lethally radioactive from Made In America depleted uranium dust.

What kind of people would do this?

Clinical tests have repeatedly shown how microwaves "rev up" incipient cancer cells several hundred times. Triggered by nuclear radiation, and turned rogue by electromagnetic warfare unleashed by US forces, human cancer cells have been found to continue proliferating wildly¡ªeven after the power source is turned off. [Scorched Earth by William Thomas]

Another wild card is radon, Hank reckons. Typically found wherever oil pools underground, pockets of this invisible, odorless and potentially deadly gas tend to concentrate in natural bowls between dunes and other niches out of the desert wind.

Ordered to "dig in", grunts typically scrape a 300 to 1000-foot diameter position to a depth of five feet, Hank explained. They then spray the ground with diesel fuel, adding to the toxic effects of any radon they¡¯ve just released. Hank claimed that during Desert Storm, his unit¡¯s radon detectors went off even more often than the constant ringing of chemical warfare exposure detectors. [Bringing The War Home by William Thomas]

Just standing around a QUEEMS or RATT rig, "makes you stupid," this combat veteran added. Which is precisely the intent behind that transmitting dish on Fallujah roofs.

" It¡¯s basic stun weaponry," Hank explains during an interview filled with revelations that later check out. The idea behind microwaving Iraq¡¯s more restive cities, he says, is to keep them "so agitated they cannot coalesce into a full force" of resistance fighters.

Overriding subtle bodily processes, selectable frequencies beamed invisibly through neighborhoods can depress the central nervous systems of everyone within a half-mile, "destroying their initiative and making them docile and lethargic." At least that¡¯s the plan.
 
Legalities and morality aside, the numbers for the Pentagon¡¯s latest energy weapon are impressive: 95-GHz transmitted energy tuned to penetrate flesh to depth of 1/64 of an inch at an officially admitted range beyond 1,000 yards.
By contrast, cell phones and portable phones have been shown to emit hazardous microwaves at "just" 2 to 6 GHz.
Despite an "earliest estimated" deployment in 2009, "heat ray" prototypes have been rushed to Iraq by a military desperate to improve the images of carnage being beamed into hundreds of millions of Muslim homes by an even more powerful beam weapon: satellite TV.

BRINGING THE WAR HOME
Hank, whose contacts also extend into Congress and the Pentagon, claims that the Humvee-portable microwave "crowd control" system was unveiled in September 2004 against some 400,000 Americans protesting genocide in Iraq at the Republican National Convention in New York City. It is not known if the microwave weapons were actually used to augment chemical agents dispensed along with beatings by police. [www.veteransforpeace.org; EE Times June 6/01]


Learn more.  For complete article, see:  url: http://www.willthomas.net/Convergence/Weekly/Microwaving_Iraq.htm

Cell Phone - Microwave Weapon Used On You
Cell Phone and Cancer Facts
Editor note:  Published in 03, Amy Worthington's article below is still news to many.

You Don't Deserve Brain Cancer-You Deserve Facts!
By Amy Worthington
1-20-3

Your cell phone is a microwave transmitter and it should bear a cancer warning! Microwave energy oscillates at millions to billions of cycles per second. The Journal of Cellular Biochemistry reports that these frequencies cause cancer and other diseases by interfering with cellular DNA and its repair mechanisms. Microwave promotes rapid cell aging. Italian scientists have recently demonstrated that cell phone radiation makes cancerous cells grow aggressively. Cordless phones marked 900 megahertz or 2.4 gigahertz emit the same dangerous microwave radiation as cell phones.
 
The connection between microwave exposure and cancer has been documented for years. During the Cold War, the Soviets irradiated the U.S. embassy in Moscow, Russia, with low level, twin-beam microwave radiation. Two successive ambassadors developed leukemia. Other staffers also developed cancer, or their blood showed DNA damage, which precedes cancer.
 
Research by University of Washington professor Dr. Henry Lai shows brain cells are clearly damaged by microwave levels far below the U.S. government's "safety" guidelines. Dr. Lai notes that even tiny doses of radiofrequency can cumulate over time and lead to harmful effects. He warns that public exposure to radiation from wireless transmitters "should be limited to a minimal."
 
Motorola advises consumers to avoid pointing a cellular antenna toward exposed parts of the body. But independent tests show that cell phones can also leak huge amounts of radiation from the keypad and mouthpiece. This radiation deeply penetrates brain, ear and eye tissues, which are especially susceptible to microwave damage. Belt clip cases allow cell phones to deliver radiation to the liver or kidney areas when a wired, hands-free earpiece is used.
 
Recent studies confirm that cell and cordless phone microwave can:
 
*Cause headaches and induce extreme fatigue
 
*Cause memory loss and mental confusion
 
*Precipitate cataracts, retina damage and eye cancer
 
*Create burning sensation and rash on the skin
 
*Damage nerves in the scalp
 
*Induce ringing in the ears, impair sense of smell
 
*Create joint pain, muscle spasms and tremors
 
*Cause digestive problems and raise bad cholesterol levels
 
*Alter the brain's electrical activity during sleep
 
*Open the blood-brain barrier to viruses and toxins
 
*Cause blood cells to leak hemoglobin
 
*Reduce the number and efficiency of white blood cells
 
*Stimulate asthma by producing histamine in mast cells
 
*Stress the endocrine system, especially pancreas, thyroid, ovaries, testes
 
In 1993, the telecom industry committed $25 million dollars for a series of research projects designed to prove that cell phones are safe. The studies proved just the opposite! They proved that federal microwave exposure standards are dangerously inadequate. Cell damage and tumors can be easily induced in the lab at about one third of the FCC's exposure guidelines.
 
 
The telecom boys panicked. They and their lackey politicians and federal regulators decided the only lucrative thing to do was to LIE and DENY. Despite damning evidence, the FDA still prevaricates: "There is no reason to conclude that there are health risks posed by cell phones to consumers." Meantime, the telecom industry has been pressing to INCREASE BY MORE THAN 10 TIMES the allowable human exposure to cell phone radiation!
 
Luckily, Dr. George Carlo headed up the industry's study project. He presents the shocking facts in his book, Cell Phones: Invisible Hazards in the Wireless Age: An Insiders's Alarming Discoveries About Cancer and Genetic Damage (Carroll and Graf, 2001). A summary of Dr. Carlo's book is this: Cell phones are hot, adequate protective regulations are naught, and Americans are being "fried" so that the deceitful telecom industry can rake it in! It's dirty business as usual, and the longer the industry can con the public, the more billions it collects.
 
On June 16, 2002, CBS aired a Sixty Minutes segment which confirmed the telecom industry is about grungy as it gets. CBS producers accused major phone service providers of cheating, scamming, forging signatures, switching phone service without permission and lying about charges. The attorney general of Connecticut stated that despite millions of dollars in fines each year, these companies remains incorrigible. Should we be trusting this industry with our brain tissues and our very lives?
 
Microwave to the head is extremely hazardous to children. Parents in some European nations are now warned to keep children away from cell phones. A University of Utah researcher found the younger the child, the more radiation is absorbed by the brain. Spanish researchers have shown that cell phones can alter electrical activity of a child's brain for hours, causing drastic mood changes and possible behavior and learning disabilities. Scientists fear that cell phone radiation could damage human embryos. Pregnant women are advised to be wary.
 
A cell phone must greatly increase its field strength to maintain communications within the metallic cage of an auto. Thus, the effect of microwave radiation inside a vehicle is especially intense. Volkswagen of Europe has warned that cell phone usage inside a car can be "injurious to health due to the extremely high electromagnetic fields generated."
 
Insurance studies in England showed that an average driver talking on a cell is actually more impaired in function and reaction time than a drunk. Finland's Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority reports that one hour of exposure to mobile phone radiation can cause human cells to shrink. Researchers believe this is due to increased protein activity, an indicator of cell damage. What an unstable world needs now is a global population afflicted with incredible shrinking brains!
 
Brain cancer rates in USA have increased by 25% since 1975. In 2001, 185,000 Americans were diagnosed with some form of brain cancer. A grade four brain tumor can grow from the size of a grape to tennis ball size in just 4 months. Brain tumors are almost always fatal and most people die within 6-12 months after diagnosis. On April 7, 2002, Sixty Minutes aired a fascinating report on brain cancer, explaining that scientists are unsure why incidence of the disease is growing so exponentially. Ironically, the segment was followed by a Sprint ad, which advised parents that the best way to keep track of teenagers is to connect them to a cell phone. While researchers say that radical damage to the brain can occur within the first few minutes of conversation, telecom ads encourage customers to spend many hours on the phone each month. Those blazing, full-page cell phone ads in newspapers and magazines must be the reason cell phone dangers are almost never discussed in the mainstream media.
 
An excellent resource tool is Robert Kane's book Cellular Telephone Russian Roulette (Vantage Press, 2001). As a telecommunications expert, Kane presents an impressive collection of studies showing that both government agencies and cell phone manufacturers KNEW YEARS AGO that cell phone radiation at present exposure levels is dangerous to human health. He notes that cell phones would be rendered useless if their RF emissions were reduced to safe levels.
 
Reports of illness from heavy cell phone usage and from living or working close to powerful RF transmitters are synchronous with numerous cancer-related lawsuits now being filed against the cell phone industry. The insurance industry sees big trouble ahead. Underwriters for Lloyd's of London refuse to insure phone manufacturers against damage to users' health. Cell phones are today what tobacco was 40 years ago. While research and debate continues, cell phone users have three basic choices:
 
1. Continue heavy microwave bombardment of brain tissues until disastrous health effects become obvious and irreversible.
 
2. Reduce cell phone usage to under 2-3 minutes per day and never use the phone in a vehicle.
 
3. Obtain a hands-free speaker phone and keep it away from the body. Everyone in the room can hear your two-way conversation, but less privacy sure beats brain fog, blindness and cancer!
 
Excellent web sites offering up-to-date scientific data on microwave and other radiation issues are: (1)www.energyfields.org (2)www.microwavenews.com (3)www.emrnetwork.org (4)www.wave-guide.org. E-mail guru@emfguru.org and ask for free updates on important radiation issues and studies. Dr. Lai's e-mail is hlai@washington.edu.
 
Powerful microwave energy directed at homes, offices and schools can flow right through windows and walls. Microwave meters and mitigation devices are available at: lessemf@lessemf.com and www.trifield.com. A specialized RF meter (in the $300 range) is useful for avoiding some environmental exposure and for keeping the interior of your home safe. Turn your microwave meter on when you drive. You will discover that from coast to coast, Americans are being bombarded with communications radiation in the microwave spectrum, just like those lucky embassy workers in Moscow who ended up so very sick. USA is having a real "blast" so to speak! And it is going to get worse as wireless technologies broaden.
 
It is in everyone's best interest to share the above information with the uninformed. Some people appear to have an almost pathological emotional attachment to their cell phones and there is a fascinating suggestion that cell radiation pulses might actually be addictive to the human brain. We can't save those who would rather die than switch. But ethics compelled us to ensure that all reasonable people have access to the basic scientific facts.


Source: 
RENSE.COM

Amy Worthington: 
observer@coldreams.com
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Despite promise, energy-beam weapons still missing from action
2005-08-12
MSNBC/Associated Press


For years, the U.S. military has explored a new kind of firepower that is instantaneous, precise and virtually inexhaustible: beams of electromagnetic energy. "Directed-energy" pulses can be throttled up or down depending on the situation, much like the phasers on "Star Trek" could be set to kill or merely stun.

<snip>

The hallmark of all directed-energy weapons is that the target -- whether a human or a mechanical object -- has no chance to avoid the shot because it moves at the speed of light. At some frequencies, it can penetrate walls.

<snip>

Among the simplest forms are inexpensive, handheld lasers that fill people's field of vision, inducing a temporary blindness to ensure they stop at a checkpoint, for example. Some of these already are used in Iraq.

A separate branch of directed-energy research involves bigger, badder beams: lasers that could obliterate targets tens of miles away from ships or planes. Such a strike would be so surgical that, as some designers put it at a recent conference here, the military could plausibly deny responsibility.

<snip>

It produces a millimeter-wavelength burst of energy that penetrates 1/64 of an inch into a person's skin, agitating water molecules to produce heat. The sensation is certain to get people to halt whatever they are doing.


Updated: 10:03 a.m. ET July 12, 2005

For complete articel see:  http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/8516353/





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