Custom House Years

Home of the 'Appy Ammers'

Riders E to H

This page list's riders who have represented "the Ammers" in some form of competative racing!

 


Riders E  

Riders F 

Riders G

Riders H

 

Riders E

Ted Ede

 

DOB 25th August 1937

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Points Record

1965 British League M17 R68 Pts26 BP9 TPts37 Ave2.059

1965 British League M18 R43 Pts27BP11 TPts38 Ave 3.353

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sprouts Elder

Lloyd Elder was a native of Fresco, California, and started out as an apprentice at a racing stable. He grew so quickly he was given the nickname “Sprouts” however, his rapid growth meant he lost his job as an apprentice, but was to turn his hand to motor cycle racing becoming a champion hill-climber in the western half of the united states and also rode on the last remaining American board circuits in the 1920s.

 In the late 20s “Sprouts” raced abroad on the new dirt tracks gaining popularity in Australia and was to become the Australian champion in 1927. When J Hoskins came to England in 1928 Sprouts joined him on a freelance basis and soon took the British scene by storm. He was the ultimate showman and soon was getting huge fees based on his popularity and spectacular riding. It was a common occurrence for him to pick up £350 a day a huge sum in those days.

 Tom Stenner wrote in thrilling the million:- ‘Elder Was a wonderful showman and the most picturesque rider ever seen. He seemed to sense what the crowd wanted, a close race with plenty of thrills, and he saw they got it. He would make a race with a donkey, as the saying goes, and just get himself home by half a wheel at the finish.’

That did not mean “Sprouts” did not push his luck and on occasion get things wrong. One night at West Ham he was so annoyed at throwing away a race he threw his crash helmet to the ground and proceeded to dance on it much too the delight of the crowd. His famous race with his fellow countryman Art Pechar is an example of his sportsmanship when he deliberately rode away from the fallen Pechar into the fence. He was rushed to a nearby hospital with fractured ribs, serious internal injuries including a punctured lung, head injuries and concussion. Amazingly he discharged himself 4 days later and on returning home, went as a spectator to an evening meeting and next day chartered a plane to Paris.

He rode for West ham in 1929 as their representative in the Star riders Championship overseas section, beating Bill Galloway of Southampton but lost out in the semi final to Vic Huxley. Sprouts never rode in the West Ham team proper. Sprouts however, did join the board of management at West Ham but still maintained his freelance approach to racing. In 1930 “Sprouts” turned out as Captain of the Southampton league outfit but team racing did not suite him and Sprouts, with a small fortune built up while riding in a three year period in England returned to America at the end of the 1930 season sadly never to return.

In 1934 Tom Stenner wrote: - ‘The memory of “Sprouts” Elder, the great American rider, flourishes like the green bay-tree, though he has not ridden in England for some three years. Elder was not only a giant of the sport, but a giant in every sense. He stood over 6 feet 3inches, and on a machine resembled nothing as much as a huge centipede as he straddled his long legs over the track. He put speed and colour into the game before Huxley had found his form or Arthur his scoring boots. He was the first to use “dope” instead of  the customary petrol –benzol  mixture for his motors, and a noxious mix it was, smelling like a  particularly vile brand of boot- blacking, but it gave him the extra speed he wanted.’

In 1930 he established a dirt track in neighbouring farmland at Fresno his home in California to teach local riders and led the boom in speedway in the US opening tracks at San Diego, Santa Ana, Long Beach and Los Angeles. He then suffered the most serious incident of his riding career being hit from behind by another rider and sustaining spinal injuries. He subsequently retired from racing following the loss of his fortune through poor financial speculation and joined the California Highway Patrol. He never however lost his love of speedway and managed to get the Highway Patrol to sponser a number of speedway races in the late-30s.

Sprouts was, to suffer life threatening injuries in a traffic accident which left him disabled and he retired from the patrol. In 1957 shortly after his wife died "Sprouts" took his own life. A sad end for the first superstar of the speedways.

In 1998 he was inducted int the Motorcycle Hall of Fame  

 


John Ellis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Dia Evans

DOB March 1938

Rode for West Ham in 1967

 Year

 M

R

 P

 BP

 TP

 CMA

FM 

 PM

 1967

 6

 15

 0.8

 -

 -

 

 


 

 

Riders F

Reg Fearman

 

 

Photo thanks to Reg!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VSRA Profile 

 


John Fitzpatrick

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Riders G

 

Tyburn Gallows

DOB 7th September 1934  DOD 1994

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Points Record

1967 British League M2 R3 Pts0 BP0 Tpts0 Ave0

1968 British League M1R2 Pts1 BP0 Tpts1 Ave2

 

 


Tommy Gamble

Photo Thanks to John Somerville  ©(Wright Wood Collection) ##

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Dick Geary

DOB 19th March 1917  DOD 1976

Photo Thanks to John Somerville  ©(Wright Wood Collection) ##

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Points Record

1946 National League M5 R12 Pts8 BP0 Tpts8 Ave2.67

 


Jimmy Gibb

DOB  17th August 1911

Photo Thanks to John Somerville  ©(Wright Wood Collection) ##

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Carl Glover

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Lloyd Goffe

DOB 30th January 1913  DOD October 1984

 

Photo Thanks to John Somerville  ©(Wright Wood Collection) ##

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


George Gower

DOB 18th July 1914  DOD December 1991

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Points Record

1946 National League M14 R52 Pts38 BP5 Tpts43 Ave3.31

 


Frank Goulden

Photo Thanks to John Somerville  ©(Wright Wood Collection) ##

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Wally Green

DOB 25th February 1918  DOD December 2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Points Record

1946 National League M3 R6 Pts4 BP1 Tpts5 Ave3.33

1947 National League M1 R4 Pts2 BP1 Tpts3 Ave3.00

 


Eric Gregory

Photo Thanks to John Somerville  ©(Wright Wood Collection) ##

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Johnny Guilfoyle

DOB 20th September 1928

Photo Thanks to John Somerville  ©(Wright Wood Collection) ##

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Keith Gurtner

DOB 21st September 1921

Details to Follow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Riders H

Alf Hagon

Photo thanks Norman Jacobs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Points Record

1964 National League ?

1965 British League M1 R4 Pts1 BP0 TPts1 Ave1

Year

M

R

P

BP

 TP

 CMA

FM

PM

1964

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1965

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Mick Handley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Points Record

1971 British League M23 R88 Pts99 BP16 TPts84 Ave3.818


Morian Hansen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Points Record

1931 Southern League (max 3 rides per match) M8 Pts48Ave6.0

 

 

 

 

 

 


Bob Harrison



Picture kind permission Reg Fearman

 

 

 

 

 

Points Record

1946 National League M9 R36 Pts65 BP5 Tpts70 Ave7.78

1947 National League M7 R27 Pts38 BP1 Tpts39 Ave5.78

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sverre Harrfeldt

 

Photo thanks to Jim Blanchard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Points Record

1965 British League M38 R152 Pts409 BP12 Tpts421 Ave11.079 FMax11 PMax3

1966 British League M28 R126 Pts298.5 BP13 Tpts311.5 Ave9.889 FMax6 PMax2

1967 British League M37 R153 Pts383 BP9 Tpts392 Ave10.248 FMax14 P1

1968 British League M30 R130 Pts313 BP5 Tpts318 Ave9.785 FMax7 PMax0

1970 British League M12 R38 Pts39 BP5 Tpts44 Ave4.632 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tiger Hart

Photo Thanks to John Somerville  ©(Wright Wood Collection) ##

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Points Record

1932 National League (max 3 rides per match) M4 Pts4 Ave1.00

 


Keith Harvey

Photo Thanks to John Somerville  ©(Wright Wood Collection) ##

 

 

 

 

 


Garry Hay

Photo Thanks to John Somerville  ©(Wright Wood Collection) ##

 

 

 

 

 

Points Record

1970 British League M22 R80 Pts70 Bpts15 Tpts85 Ave4.250

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Buzz Hibberd

Photo Thanks to John Somerville  ©(Wright Wood Collection) ##

Buzz was an early star of the cinders at West Ham and took a young Bluey Wilkinson under his wing when he also arrived from Australia. Buzz was a leading light at Custom House in those early days and often boasted of being the blizzard champion, following freak weather at a very early meeting which, ended with the meeting finishing in a snowstorm. Riders tackled a snow covered track and supporters had to blow on their hands to keep them warm. Of course Buzz won the meeting. Buzz spent 2 years at Custom House from 1928, but was sadly to loose his life in a track crash on returning home.

Cyril May wrote in the Speedway Star and News on nov 15th 1968

If ever death and disaster stalked the speedway, it was in the Australian season. It stood out as a period of casualties and off deaths, and the only time when the grim sequence of accidents made Max Grosskreutz contemplate retiring from the sport for good.

It started from the moment the party landed at Perth, when the news was heard of the death of the Australian Sig Slam which had occurred at Perth speedway only a few days previously. It seemed a bad omen.

When the group of riders arrived at Brisbane, they heard of the deaths of two more Australian riders - Jim Harris and Fred Stilling at the Sydney circuit.

But in spite of these tragedies, the game had to go on. Arrangements were made for Ray Tauser, Fran Arthur, Ray Duckett and Max to go on tour as a team which was known as the Tigers. Their first engagement was at Sydney and on arriving. Max Grosskreutz was delighted to meet Buzz Hibberd, another Australian, with whom he had previously shared digs in England and in the Argentine and who had just returned home after 2 years. Not unnaturally, the two began discussing the recent tragedies, and Buzz asked the team if they would give their services free on the following Wednesday evening, as a benefit meeting was being staged for the dependants of Harris and Stilling. Of course, in the traditionally sportsmanlike way, they readily agreed.

On the evening that Buzz had made the request, there was a meeting, at which the team was engaged, and Grosskreutz was talking to him in the pits. Hibberd asked him for some "dope", as he was running short, and Buzz told him to help him-self, just as a pit official called on him to ride in his heat. "I won’t be a minute" he remarked.” I will see you in a minute" those are the last words Buzz ever spoke to Max.

He was riding against Duckett and Tauser; it was certain to be a close race, so Max watched it, Ray Tauser retired. Buzz was going extremely well, well when suddenly he wobbled and crashed. Both he and the machine looped in the air and hit the fence. As Max could sense it was a serious spill; he leaped the fence and raced to the unfortunate rider. The ambulance men were already putting him on a stretcher. Unconscious but still alive. After being rushed to hospital, Buzz Hibberd failed to pull through and died in the early hours of the following morning.

That news dumbfounded the team. Buzz Hibberd was buried the following Monday and the Tigers acted as pall-bearers. 


Ron Howes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Points Record

1946 National League M17 R57 Pts42 BP6 Tpts48 Ave3.37

 


Geoff Hughs

 

 

 

 

 

 


Norman Hunter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Points Record

1965 British League M39 R156 Pts352 BP Tpts377 Ave9.677 FMax5 PMax3

1966 British league M39 R172 Pts382 BP23 Tpts405 Ave9.419 FMax8 PMax3

1967 British League M39 R165 Pts293.5 BP17.5 Tpts311 Ave7.539 FMax4 PMax2

1968 British League M35 R150 Pts349 BP15 Tpts364 Ave9.707 FMax6 PMax3

 


Gerry Hussey

Photo thanks to Norman Jacobs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Basse Hveem

Photo Thanks to John Somerville  ©(Wright Wood Collection) ##

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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