COMPOTE DE POMME: APPLE SAUCE

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Stephen's Compote de Pomme: (Version #1)

First added: 2012-12-31; Last edited: 2013-01-05


Apple Sauce (Version #1): made with peeled apples.

Apple Sauce (Version #2): made with apples peels and cores!

Author: Stephen Chin-Bow (Yale College alum)

Background:

It has been many years since I first tasted homemade applesauce, but it is a very strong memory.  My family was visiting Tom H, one of my father's friends, who lived with his wife Claudia in the Catskills region of upstate New York.  I remember being amazed when Claudia used her blender (this was before the "immersion blender wand" era) to transform cooked apples into apple sauce.  Claudia, thank you for making homemade apple sauce look so easy to make.

This recipe was "developed" without using any references.  After I learned that the French name for apple sauce is "compote de pomme" I went to add it to the YaleCooks "European-French" recipe page.  I was surprised to discover that Ouardane J had already contributed the name when he shared his list of traditional French dishes he recommended that people learn.  He described the dish as "mashed cooked apples" which did not resonate with me until after I reflected on the technique I had used.  Mashing is a very accurate word!  Merci, Ouardane!

Version #1 may be the best "starter" recipe, because the only piece of equipment the beginner may need to purchase is a "vegetable" peeler.

Essential Supplies & Ingredients: ()

• 1 vegetable peeler
• 1 apple corer (optional)

• at least 8 - 10 apples, about 1.5 kilogram (red or yellow delicious apples, or another "eating" apple variety, are preferred)

sugar, to taste
cinnamon, to taste

Instructions:

Peeling the Apples: (at most 60 seconds per apple; the time is determined by the type of peeler and if its blade is sharp)

The following peeling strategy works for me, but use the method which works best for you.  Save the apple peels if you also plan to try Version #2 of this recipe.

1) Rinse apples and remove stems (discard stems, preferably by composting).

2) Peel a circular "ring" around the bottom of the apple.  Also peel a circular "ring" around the top of the apple.  I do this first, because peeling the bottom requires the most attention.  Most red-yellow delicious apples are "bumpy" on the bottom.

3) Next, quickly peel the sides of the apple, connecting the "rings".  This step is easier, because less attention is required.

4) If you have an apple corer, use it now.  If you use the model which simple removes the core you also need to slice the apples into six or eight slices.  Save the apple cores if you plan to try Version #2 of this recipe.

If you do not have an apple corer cut each apple into four or six pieces.  Then using a small knife use two cuts to remove the core (using a "v-shaped" slice).

5) Transfer the apples to a pot as your process them.

Cooking the Apples: (at most 30 minutes)

6) Cook for a few minutes using medium heat until you hear the apples begin to sizzle.

7) Add about 1/2 cup of water to the apples and cover pot.  Accuracy is not important; the goal is to create a little steam to accelerate the cooking process

8) Continue cooking using low-medium heat, stirring every 5 - 10 minutes.  The goal of the stirring is to simply (and quickly) mix the apples, not to mash the apples.

9) When the apples are very soft (after 20 - 30 minutes), turn off heat.  Mash (merci, Ouardane!) apples with a large utentil (such as a spoon or fork).

10) Add sugar and cinnamon, to taste, if necessary.

Other Options:

1) The French occasionally serve apple sauce with whipped cream or ice cream.

2) If you use "eating" apples with this recipe you will not need to add sugar, although you may prefer to add a little cinnamon.  You can use this same recipe with tart apples (eg. Granny Smiths), but you will probably want to add sugar.

Assessment and Possible Improvements:

...

Stephen's Compote de Pomme: (Version #2)

First added: 2012-12-31; Last edited: 2013-01-05


Apple Sauce (Version #2): made with apples peels and cores!

Apple Sauce (Version #1): made with peeled apples.

Author: Stephen Chin-Bow (Yale College alum)

Background:

This recipe was "developed" because I did not want to waste the apple peels from Version #1.

Remember, version #1 may be the best "starter" recipe, because the only piece of equipment the beginner may need to purchase is a "vegetable" peeler.  This recipe requires an immersion "wand" blender, because the apple peels will not simply fall apart after cooking.

Essential Supplies & Ingredients: ()

• 1 immersion blender

• apple peels and cores from preparing Compote de Pomme: Version #1

sugar, to taste
cinnamon, to taste

Instructions:

Processing the Cores: (at most 30 seconds per apple core)

1) The fastest way (which has a little waste) is to snap each apple core into three pieces.  Discard the central section which has the seeds (preferably, by composting)

Cooking the Apples Skins & Cores: (at most 30 minutes)

2) Cook for a few minutes using medium heat until you hear the apples begin to sizzle.

3) Add about 1/2 cup of water to the apples and cover pot.  Accuracy is not important; the goal is to create a little steam to accelerate the cooking process

4) Continue cooking using low-medium heat, stirring every 5 - 10 minutes.

5) When the skins are soft (after 20 - 30 minutes), turn off heat and allow the apple skins to cool.

6) Use an immersion blender until the apple skins reach the desired texture.

7) Add sugar and cinnamon to taste.

Other Options:

1) The French occasionally service apple sauce with whipped cream or ice cream.

Assessment and Possible Improvements:

...

Annotated Internet Links:

1)

Recommended Cookbooks:

1)

 


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