Family History


compiled by Susan Martin martis1@hotmail.co.uk WILLIAM JACKSON Born: 1835/1836 Clerkenwell. Father: William Jackson Mother: Mary Died: 19/7/1888 19 Gurney Rd, Forest Gate. Married: undiscovered Spouse: Mary Usher Born: 1833 Sandy, Bedfordshire Father: John Usher Mother: Sarah Died: 1892.West ham district Children: David Jackson b 1859 Islington Emma Jackson b 1861 Clerkenwell Robert George Jackson b 1864 Clerkenwell William Jackson b 1869 Clerkenwell Harriet Jackson b 1873 Forest Ggate 1851 census: Residing with parents. Occupation: an errand boy (possibly for father) 1859 : Residing in Islington where son David William was born summer 1859 1861 census: Residing 63 Winchester Street, Clerkenwell, Occupation: shoemaker Mary’s place of birth given as Clerkenwell. House shared by twelve others, the family of a tailoress and that of a (possible) cigar maker 1871 census: residing 57 Collier St, Clerkenwell (shared with the family of a carman). Occupation: boot maker 1881 census: Residing 2 Forest Street or Place, Forest Gate, West Ham. 0ccupation shoemaker. Son David a shoemaker, Emma a domestic servant and Robert George an errand boy 1888: At time of death residing 29 Gurney Rd, Forest Gate. Death caused by apoplexy. Informed by his son D Jackson of 15 St Mary’s Cottages, Ilford on 23/7/1888. Occupation of William given as bootmaker master 1891: Mary, widow, residing 189 Bignold Rd, Forest gate. Occupation: housekeeper to her family Note: Death caused by apoplexy. Informed by his son D Jackson of 15 St mary’s Cottages, Ilford on 23/7/1888. Occupation of William given as bootmaker master When Charles Booth surveyed the area 1899 to 1900 he classified Winchester Street as light blue to purple (poor to comfortable) and Collier Street as some purple to pink (so fairly comfortable). He noted that some houses in Winchester Street were three and a half stories, which would account for the number of residents in the house shared by William Jackson. William was a master bootmaker. A journeyman had served an apprenticeship and was qualified in his trade and would after a few years be able to become a master and take on apprentices. I think by 1888 the term master was more loosely used for someone well qualified in his trade. . Death certificate is available