Art's Long Island Motor Parkway Site

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Colonial Springs Road - Bagatelle Road

Shown on the left side of this 1952 Hagstrom map (same map as in previous page), the Motor Parkway ran along the south side of Colonial Springs Road (also shown in yellow as East Neck Road).  It ran south next to the cemetary before turning east and north.  Then it crossed Colonial Springs Road west of Bagatelle Road (shown as Conklin's Road) and went into Half Hollow Hills.  Further north, it crossed over Bagatelle Road and veered its way towards today's Long Island Expressway (further explorations will hopefully provide some additional posts of this area, one of which I believe I already may have sighted).

Shown here is the spot where the Motor Parkway crossed Colonial Springs Road and began its northward route along Bagatelle (Conklin's) Road.  As shown, it today runs along a farm that borders Lee Avenue on the above map.  Access is by way of a road which doesn't go anywhere and seems to be used as an entry into the farm and the parking lot of a VFW Hall (the building in the triangular piece of property in the picture).   Walking the route is quite difficult with overgrown bushes and thorns abounding.  On the west side are campgrounds of a private camp.  A single Motor Parkway post was found and shown in the following photos and depicted here.   

Behind the VFW Hall - Looking North

View Looking South Towards Colonial Springs Road

This next series of photos show the the view of the Motor Parkway looking south, just before it crosses Colonial Springs Road.  The pavement in the foreground and center most probably are remnants of the original roadway.  In the rear of the photo is a mound of debris which overlooks the location of the bridge that went over Colonial Springs Road (see following photos for a close-up).

Sole Post Found

Here are pictures of the post mentioned above.  Originally it was lying on its side, but to make it more evident, I lifted it up a bit. The farm to the east of the roadway area is clearly shown.  Somewhat harder to see, is the metal wire at the top of the post that is commonly found on Parkway posts.  Also not shown is an old tire 3/4 of the way buried, lying appropriately near the Motor Parkway post.

View Looking North