G1HBE

Better than Nothing.

Forget the electric cars...

 

 

 

Since I built a Micromatic from a kit in about 1967, I've been a bit of a Sinclair fan.  Then in 1970 I bought a pair of Z30's and a Project 60 pre-amp and I had my very first stereo. The record deck was a Garrard SP25 fitted with a Shure M3D cartridge. At first I used a pair of Sinclair  Q16 speakers but later homebrewed a pair of half-decent floor-standing units. My friends and I even ran a mobile disco powered by a similar amplifier using a pair of the higher power Z50's.  On the left we have the sad remains of my Sinclair years: a Cambridge calculator which still works(!), the Project 60 manual and a Z30. It's a rebuilt one with the heatsink on back-to-front. Sad indeed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A recent addition to the collection, this is the FTV1-B, Sinclair's flat-screen pocket TV. LCD TV displays were in their infancy when this model was designed, so a conventional CRT was squashed and bent to fit the flat format. The production of this 'sideways firing' tube was a breakthrough in itself, but it was bound to be a short-term solution until truly flat LCD's became workable.

 

 

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 I recently got thinking about the pair of walkie talkies I had in the mid 60's when I were a lad. They were Lancer model RT-33, and by an amazing chance I happened to glance in the window of a house-clearance shop in the next town and I saw a scruffy box which had a picture of the very same type!

I had to have them and at a tenner they were cheap enough. There are only three transistors in each set and they operate on 27.065 MHz. The output from the crystal controlled power oscillator is around the 20mW mark. This is amplitude modulated by the other two transistors which work as a microphone amplifier.

The receiver is a simple super regenerative 'rush box', and this time the other two transistors are used to drive the speaker.

They are in almost mint condition with only slight chipping around the coin-slot which is used to open the case for battery replacement. On test they worked a treat and seemed to have a range of about 300 yards, which is as I remember from my original pair. The original packing is all present and correct, but very scruffy.

I thought I'd never ever see another pair of these, so I'm amazed that I just stumbled across them in a junk shop!