Craven's Acres

ENGLISH BULLDOGS PUPS AND STUDS

Craven Acres will appear in the NEW DOG

World Magazine as New Jersey's selected

Bulldog breeder's !!!!!

 The Breeder's of A Life-Time Guarantee (6 years)and a return policy!! 24/7 unconditional Love and Support

We are the only breeders in the world that offer this!!!!

 

SEE CLIENTS PUPS THAT ARE OFFERED NOW ON AVAILABLE PUPPY PAGE! click on link below

                 AVAILABLE PUPPIES

 

T-Bone

Our Desperado..........................  

Welcome to Craven's Haven of Bulldog's   

Where we are known for our.......        

              

 

 The Breeder's of  A Life-Time Guarantee and a return   policy!! 24/7 unconditional Love and Support

We are the only breeders in the world that offer this!!!!

 

 

    Voted  Award Winning Ethical Breeders !

                                  Visit us on Face-Book!

 

 

        

               Know your purchasers rights here!NJ laws

           

We also offer Military discount's or to whom has served  

             our  community's .....to show our appreciation

   


                            Playing hard on the farm

    

 

               ( Our version)....The End of the Trail

            

 

        The Hard working  Farmer.........

            

          And the pups we raise................

         

                                           Bordeaux's and Bullies

             

                                      *CA  La Rouge*(aka Lucy) 

 It took years of research on a breed we wanted to guard the farm... yet not an aggressive dog to worry about being around other dogs and pups. We didn't want a liability. We also didn't want a breed that was known for all kind of hereditary issues.

As we know the English Bulldogs can be challenging as far as health issues but most of all they are no guard dogs... as they love everyone! So We made a business conscience decision and added two sisters(Lucy & Karma) to our Family and breeding program .

The  Dogue-De-Bordeaux aka French Mastiff

 

         Thee ONLY breeder's in the world 

  that offers  a 6 year Guarantee on full price pups!! 

 

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             Our Second Home (The Kennel)

 

  

Our Visitors

 

 


 Craven Acres was a victim to an anonymous caller reporting false information of 25 dogs in distress living in basement. The warranted search of the Cumberland County SPCA was done at 9AM and this video was taken during there search investigation. The kids in the kennel had just been fed again in the am of this very morning at 8 am before cleaning the kennels.So with that said they had gone all night after pm feeding till the next morning for am feeding when they did this search. There are 2 TO 3 dogs per run,6 piles of feces per run that had accumulated since dinner the night before. So within 12 hours It is my opinion but I would think it to be normal to have 3 bowel movements after each meal.This has caused a summons of unsanitary living conditions. Which is a form of animal cruelty,which makes my entire life a lie as I have donated every breath of my being to the animals.... all of my life, 15+ years in Vet Tech,working for these very people at the CCSPCA. Years of donations and support and in 2 hours my entire life was destroyed over a vindictive jealous vengeful individual who pleaded with me to take her premature pups as she had already lost 3 with 4 survivors. HER VET LOST ONE AND THE OWNER LOST ANOTHER BEFORE CONTACTING ME FROM A previous CLIENT :)

It was evident they had premature lungs and I cared for them for 3 straight days while in intensive care. No sleep what so ever! I had lost 2 that came to me gasping there last breaths and managed to keep them alive for almost 2 days but they were to far gone and infection(pneumonia) had already set in days before they came to me DUE TO ASPIRATION WITH A BOTTLE.I did all that I could as if they were my own and now she is suing us for $4000, the cost of 2 unregistered pups. She also caused the warranted search by making a false complaint that lead into the search with a ending result in animal cruelty.My name and business has taken a huge Toll due to the false complaints made on the net. So with that said.... I'm not going to run or hide,open another site after having this one for almost 18 years but yet take a long brake and in hopes time will heal all wounds.I wish everyone years of happiness and health. God Bless, Lisa Craven UPDATE: Craven Acres won in court and the plaintiffs(Jessica Gordillo Moore)  had to be escorted off court premisses by police due to there disrespect to the courts and judge! Jessica gordillo moore was  directed by the judge to remove all the false  defimation over the net and has still NOT to this day, seen it thru so i'm afraid its back to court again but there will be heavy heavy fines this time! Jessica gordillo moore was awarded NOTHING except the words from the judge which was how dare you bring this woman into court for helping you in such dire need! You should be embarrassed!She also had a fine lawyer and I went Pro-say!                        SEE VIDEO BELOW AND ALSO VET LETTERS!

 Letter from my supervising vet who did appear in court that day!!!! Thank you DR Julie Stephenson!!!!!xoxoxoxoxox

 

 

 

 

   

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Why are English Bulldogs So much?

If you are looking for a "bargain price" maybe this is not the breed that you should be looking into,or the place. In order to breed HIGH QUALITY and HEALTHY Bulldogs, it is NOT CHEAP! There is a great deal of time, effort, and expense involved in raising a Bulldog litter. Needless to say the health screening's on all dogs bred which is thee most important! We have up to 5 generations here so we always know what it is we are getting!
Bulldogs have that great and beautiful look whether they're a puppy or an adult. Bulldogs require artificial insemination to breed and a c -section for delivery of the puppies. The cost for the breeder to breed a litter can run well into the thousands. (not counting the time put into them and taking off work if the breeder works a regular job.) The cost for a c-section usually runs anywhere between $1,800-$2,500 assuming it is during normal vet hours and that there are no complications during surgery. After hours, weekends, and holidays will run extra. The cost to breed the dog/stud service....Additionally there are progesterone tests, exams, x-rays, ultra sounds, special diets, getting the nursery ready with special heating pads,blankets,medical supplies,milk re placer,and those are just the basics. Then when a litter is born the puppies must be fed every 2 hours for the two weeks then it slows down each week between feedings. The breeder has to sit at every feeding and never leave the puppies alone. English Bulldogs are not like other dogs. They do not realize that any slight movement could crush the baby. It is very easy for them to lay or roll over on the baby and not even realize it. So to insure this does not happen the breeder must sit with them at all times during feeding. There are other reasons besides that, but litters are human assisted for several weeks around the clock... c -section for Bulldogs are a requirement for several reasons like: high rates of water puppies which can't pass through the birth canal, large head and shoulders of the puppies, stress and heat factors may cause a Bulldog trouble,calcium is another form of distress and the ability to "push" out a full litter is often to much on a Bulldog and many other factors. It is VERY time consuming compared to other breeds where everything is humanly taken care of by the male and female dog including the birth, delivery, and raising of a litter. This is a special breed which requires the help of humans to bring a litter to 8 weeks of age. We LOVE what we do and would not have it any other way. THEY ARE WORTH EVERY PENNY. Once you have "Been Owned" by a bulldog you could never again be without one...

               


Contacts us at

cell phone 609-805-7351


TEXTS ARE WELCOME!

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Craven Acres does not have any pups offered at this time of our own.

Due to working on our license for the kennel but at times I do a pick of litter with clients instead of paying for the stud fee. That is there option. The client sells my puppy and in return I get my stud fee once the pup sells. I will list what they have and when they have it :)Meanwhile be patient and don't buy off back yard breeders and puppy millers....EXP STORES!   You will get what you pay for! Also educate yourself on purchasers rights! see link below.  So please if you are in fact interested please just sign the guest-book and you will be notified who... and when, if anyone has any pups available before they are posted,,thanks for you appreciation :)

 

I have English Bulldogs, what should I test my dogs for?

Many people are interested in testing a dog to see if they carry either the “blue gene” or the “chocolate gene”.  The “blue gene” is really a misnomer, as the dilution gene dilutes all types of pigment.  The dilute gene is recessive, so a dog must have two copies of that gene to appear dilute (diluted black pigment is termed ‘blue’, diluted chocolate pigment is termed ‘lilac’).  To test for the dilute gene, please indicate D-Locus testing on your submission form. 

To summarize, here are the potential genotypes for the Dilute gene.

Genotype
Phenotype
Hidden Colors
D/D
Full Color
None
D/d
Full Color
Dilute
d/d
Dilute
None

 

The “chocolate gene” is what causes a dog to produce brown coat color, rather than black.  Thus, a dog that is chocolate will be chocolate-and-tan or chocolate tri, rather than a black-and-tan or standard tricolor.  Chocolate dogs will also have brown noses and pads.  The “chocolate gene” is also recessive, so a dog must have two copies of this allele to appear chocolate.  To test for the “chocolate gene”, please indicate B-Locus testing on your submission form.

To summarize, here are the potential genotypes for the Chocolate gene.

Genotype
Phenotype
Hidden Colors
B/B
Normal Black Pigment
none
B/b
Normal Black Pigment
Chocolate Pigment
b/b
Dilute
None

 

Often, breeders also want to test their English Bulldogs for “Black.”  This is tricky, as there is not one black gene, but several genes that can cause black coat color.  The Dominant Black gene (K-Locus) causes only black coat color to be produced.  White is actually an absence of color, so dominant black dogs can be solid black or black and white.  Dogs that not dominant black have their color determined by the Agouti gene. 

The Agouti gene can also cause dogs to appear black, depending on which genes the dog carries.  The Agouti allele that is the most dominant is the AY allele, which causes the fawn or sable coat color.  The allele that causes black-and-tan or tricolor coat color is the “at” allele, which is recessive to the AY allele.  A third allele causes the dog to appear solid black, which is the “a” allele.  This is the most recessive allele.

Here are the potential genotypes for a dog for the Dominant Black gene (K-Locus).
If the phenotype of the dog is “Agouti”, please look to the dog’s genotype for the Agouti gene (A-Locus) to determine his color.

Genotype
Phenotype
Hidden Colors
KB/KB
Dominant Black
none
KB/kbr
Dominant Black
Brindled Agouti Pattern
KB/ky
Dominant Black
Agouti Pattern
kbr/kbr
Brindled Agouti Pattern
None
kbr/ky
Brindled Agouti Pattern
Agouti Pattern
ky/ky
Agouti Pattern
None

Here are the potential genotypes for a dog for the Agouti gene:

Genotype
Phenotype
Hidden Colors
AY/AY
Fawn/Sable
none
AY/at
Fawn/Sable
Black-and-Tan or Tricolor
AY/a
Fawn/Sable
Solid Black
at/at
Black-and-Tan or Tricolor
None
at/a
Black-and-Tan or Tricolor
Solid Black
a/a
Solid Black
None

Because you cannot test for the black-and-tan or “at” allele, testing at the AY- and a- Locus can determine if your dog carries that gene or not.  For example, if a Fawn dog tests AY/AY, he does not carry the black and tan gene.  However, if he tests n/AY, he only has 1 copy of the fawn allele.  The other copy must then either be the “at” or the “a” allele.  If that same dog then tests n/a for the a-Locus, you know he is AY/A.  If he tests n/n for the a-Locus, you he must be AY/at, and would carry a copy of the black and tan or tricolor gene.  Thus, to test for “black” in a fawn dog, please mark the A-Locus (AY) and the A-Locus (a) boxes on your form.

For a dog that is already black and tan or tricolor, you know he must be n/n for AY.  Here you may want to test for the recessive black gene to see if he has one or two copies of the black-and-tan or tricolor gene (at).   If your dog is tricolor or black and tan, please mark the A-Locus (a) box on your form.

A dog that is black or black and white can be tested for Dominant Black, or the K-Locus, to determine if he has 1 or 2 copies of the KB allele.  If he is KB/KB, he will always pass on the dominant black gene, and will always produce blacks or black and whites.  If he is n/KB, there is another allele present, so he will only pass on his dominant black color 50% of the time.  To test a black and white dog for the dominant black gene, please mark the K-Locus (KB) on your submission form. 

 

             

I have titled this page "for dummies", as I would consider myself a "dummy" when it comes to the topic of coat color genetics of the French Bulldog. My intent in presenting this information is simply to articulate the genetics involved with breeding french bulldogs in such a way that benefits myself and anyone else who struggles to understand the complexities of genetics. All of the information I am going to summarize based on my own understanding and way of thinking about that which I have gathered through my own research on this subject matter and through my personal breeding experiences. If anyone has any challenges to anything written here please contact me, I welcome all questions and corrections.

The first two colors I will discuss are blue and chocolate, mainly because these are the easiest to understand, as well as explain on the genetic level. There are a few terms that I will explain first to help us later. The first two are genotype and phenotype. Sounds compicated, but just break it down like this ... geno=gene (deals with what the dogs actual genes look like), pheno (P is for picture, deals with what the dog physically looks like, the physical picture of the dog). You can also consider genotype is what is on the inside, phenotype is what is on the outside.

The most controversial color is the Blue French Bulldog, (also called mouse) which appears grayish in color. There are several genetic locations (Loci) in which determine a dog's color genetically. At each location, is a pair of genes (Alleles). For Blue, the Loci, or location is called D for dilution. The possible alleles (or genes) at the D loci are "D" and "d". Every dog is either "D-D", "D-d", or "d-d". These are the genotypes. A genotype of "D-D" produces a pheontype of Non-dilute, or non-blue (Basically any other color of french bulldog). The genotype "D-d" is what is typically called a "blue-carrier", "blue-lined", or "blue-factored" frenchie. These dogs have a phenotype EXACTLY the same as "D-D". They are NON-dilutes, and NON-blues. "D" is a dominant allele over "d" so only dogs which have a "d-d" genotype will have a blue or dilute phenotype. In other words, only "d-d" dogs are actually blue in color.

Blue is a dilution which acts on black pigment as well as black colored hairs. Any pigment or hairs that would otherwise be black are diluted from black to blue on a "d-d" dog. This is what makes solid blue, blue brindle, blue fawn, blue pied, blue with tan points, blue masked fawn, blue sable fawn, and all other varieties of blue possible. All of these listed colors have the same genetic make-up, "d-d" at the D loci.

For breeding practices, most frenchies are D-D, non-blue. Any frenchie that is D-D will NEVER produce a blue puppy and any dog that HAS produced a blue puppy cannot be D-D. Only D-d and d-d dogs can produce blue offspring. Any dog D-D, that is bred to a blue d-d, will produce an entire litter of D-d puppies, which are blue-carriers, but not blue. Each puppy enherits one gene from each parent.

Here is where the math comes into play. If a blue dog d-d is bred to a blue-carrier D-d, then statistics tells us that 50% of puppies will be blue d-d. The other 50% of puppies from that breeding would be blue-carriers D-d. In a perfect world a litter of 4 from such a pair would produce 2 blue pups and 2 non-blue blue-carriers. This is not always the case. Firstly, we are not always dealing with litters of 4, and secondly the percentages don't always work out when dealing with such a small amount of data. Perhaps if we considered data from hundreds or thousands of litters we might find those percentages.

For our purposes it would suffice to just understand that this breeding pair CAN create either blues, or blue-carriers, but cannot produce any D-D pups. Learning to understand genetics can help a breeder predict what colors are going to be produced in offspring, and help them make the best decisions on which dogs to breed together.

Chocolate or liver, works the same way as blue. At the chocolate loci, B (I say B for brown) exists the two alleles "B" and "b". French bulldogs can either be "B-B" (non-chocolate), "B-b" (chocolate-carriers), or "b-b" (chocolate). B is dominant to b so only those dogs with a "b-b" genotype will express the chocolate color. Chocolate is similar to a dilution as it acts upon black pigment and hairs and can create such color patterns as solid chocolate, chocolate brindle, chocolate masked fawn, chocolate pied, chocolate with tan points, etc.

Similar to Blue and Chocolate is the recessive Cream gene. The allele Cch (nicknamed chinchilla) can be found at the C loci and is recessive to the C allele. However, unlike blue and chocolate, a third allele exists at this loci which is noted C-d and produces white. I do not have a complete understanding of the way the genetics works at this loci and am still looking for further information. I do not know if the Cch only effects fawn colored hairs in which case you could have a brindled or masked cream. I also do not have a good grasp on how the three alleles interact with each other. Frenchies can be "C-C" non-cream. I assume "C-Cch" is non-cream, and "Cch-Cch" is cream, and likewise that "Cd-Cd" is white. What I do not know is what phenotype would be expressed by "C-Cd" and "Cch-Cd". I would appreciate any explanation on this by anyone who knows.

The next Loci to talk about is K. At the K loci is where the determination is made for brindle or fawn. Possible alleles are K, Kbr, and k. K is dominant (solid) black, which is theorized not to exist in the French Bulldog population. This would not require that no solid black frenchies exist, but that solid black is not due to a dominant K allele. If this is the case, then the only allele options are "kbr" and "k" and we can simplify this loci to a basic dominant-recessive relationship (similar to blue or chocolate) with "kbr" (brindle) being dominant over "k" (fawn or non-brindle). "kbr-kbr" and "kbr-k" would be brindle, while only "k-k" would be fawn (or non-brindle). A Homozygous (which just means two of the same gene) brindle "kbr-kbr" would always produce brindle pups. This would be beneficial if one is trying to produce brindle-colored pups, or detrimental if one is trying to produce non-brindles.

Though this relationship seems to be easily understood by removing the K (dominant black) allele from the picture, there is still much more to consider on top of the K loci in the brindle-fawn relationship.

E, the extension loci, has the ability to hide brindle. At the E loci, possible alleles are Em which is dominant to E, E (also dominant to e) and e. Any frenchie with "Em-Em", "Em-E", or "Em-e" will have a black mask, unless the mask is hidden by white in a piebald dog. Masks can also sometimes be undectible in very dark brindles or solid black. The recessive "e-e" is a disfunctional extension that does not permit black to be formed. This is dominant to Kbr so a dog that is "Kbr-Kbr" or even "Kbr-k" but which also has "e-e" at the E loci would be fawn, but carry brindle genetically. You could even have a homozygous (Kbr-Kbr) that is fawn due to a disfunctional extension "e-e" but would only produce brindle pups, even though brindle is dominant to fawn.

The A loci is the one responsible for the different variations of fawn. Possible alleles are Ay, Aw, At, and a. Ay is dominant (solid) fawn. Aw is for (wild or wolf-type) and is responsible for the sable in some fawns. At is responsible for tan points (black and tans). Lastly, a, is recessive black. I do not have all of the info on how these four alleles interact with one another and am still doing research on this Loci as well.

The last loci to discuss is S, spotted. This is where piebald markings come from. Alleles are S, si, sp, and sw. S is dominant for self-colored (can have white chest or toes - under 10 percent white). The si is for Irish spotting, which usually is white chest, lower legs, undersides, white collar, white blaze and can be 10-30 percent white. Our girl, Aimi is a great example of this genotype. The sp allele is for the typical piebald, which is random spots of color can be 20-80 percent white and is usually non-symmetrical. The sw allele is for extreme white. Our stud Piggy and our girl Pearl are both good examples of this genotype. Piggy's coat is PURE white while Pearl has freckling or ticking in her skin which shows through her coat. The sw allele is usually at least 90 percent white with only small colored patches on the face and near the tail. I am also still researching how these alleles interact with one another for breeding prediction purposes.

Testimonials

  • "I got my Bulldog puppy in 2009 from LIsa at Craven Acres. I met her and her husband and they showed me "their Family" of Dogs. I was very impressed with their kennels and the ..."
    Bob Roberts
    Best Dog!!!
  • "I purchased my bulldog from Lisa at Craven acres May 2009. My dog is a full time playmate for my three children, especially my 1 1/2 yoa, they are connected at the hip.Brodie is..."
    satisfied customer
  • "I purchased an English Bulldog puppy from Craven Acres in July of 2007. Lennon, now almost 4 years young, is in immaculate health and has kept his pristine condition. The day I ..."
    Jessica Hoffman
    Proud to be Mom