The 519th Transportation Association, Thailand

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An Overview of the 519th Transportation Battalion


World War II

 

Constituted on 1 April 1943, and re-organized as Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 302nd, 303rd, 304th, and 305thPort Companies. It was activated on 25 June 1943 at Indiantown Gap Military Reservation, Pennsylvania as the 519th Port Battalion.

 

In December 1943, the men of the 519th Port Battalion commanded by Major Charles M. Nabors, worked the ports from Army Base Boston, handling and loading cargo headed overseas. The 519th Port Battalion embarked from Camp Miles Standish in Boston, Massachusetts aboard the E.P. Alexander to England early in 1944.


These are the patches worn by the 519th Port Battalion

Army Amphibious Patch (1944)

1st Engineer Special Brigade


Engineer Amphibious Command (1944)


After a brief training period (April – May), the 519th Port Battalion, received two additional units, the 280th Port Company on 4 May 1944, and the 279th Port Company on 13 May 1944 and became attached to the 1st Engineer Special Brigade for participation in the invasion of Normandy, going ashore at Utah Beach on 7 June 1944. The 519th Port Battalion worked clearing the ports of Normandy until 14 November 1944.

 

The 519th Port Battalion also worn this European Theater of Operations in World War II patch

Dave H. Weaver and Bruce C. Kramlich were both assigned to the 519th Port Battalion during the deployment to England, the Normandy Invasion and at Antwerp Belgium. Here’s what they had to say about their time with the 519th Port Battalion:

“I was a member of the 304th Port Company, 519th Port Battalion from July 1943. I took Basic and Advanced training at Indiantown Gap Military Reservation, Pennsylvania before being stationed at Camp McKay in Boston. We worked in various facilities in the Port of Boston until we departed on 24 March 1944 on the troopship E.P. Alexander and arrived in Liverpool, England on 5 April 1944. We soon moved to Bristol, England where we were billeted in private homes (since all Army installations were bulging with GIs at that time). For two months we worked in the ports of Bristol, Swansea and Newport Wales handling materials destined for the impending invasion of France.

We arrived in Normandy on 6 June 1944, and began unloaded the vessels we arrived on, (one vessel was hit by a dive bomber - killing 20 members of our battalion). We were quartered in an area about 300 yards inland from the seawall, and later in an apple orchard nearby. We worked 12 hour shifts for approximately 5 months unloading all sorts of ships, landing craft, etc.

We were then sent, to the Port of Antwerp, Belgium after it had been taken by Canadian troops, providing better facilities than were available at the beach. We worked in Antwerp (through 175 days of continuous air and V-bomb attacks).

Following V-Day we returned to the US, on a point system. I left Europe on 12 January 1946 and was discharged on 16 February 1946. I served in various capacities in the 304th, primarily as a winch operator.

See photo album page for pictures of the Normandy monument list the 490th Port Battalion, 518th Port Battalion, and 519th Port Battalion, all attached to the First Engineers Special Brigade in France.” – Dave H. Weaver

 “I was a member of the 519th Port Battalion from July 1943 until I was transferred to the 334th Harbor Craft Company in December 1945 at Antwerp, Belgium. I was initially a clerk with Headquarters & Headquarters Detachment, 519th Port Battalion. I was discharged in January 1946” – Bruce C. Kramlich.

 At this time the 279th Port Company was replaced by the 281st Port Company who accompanied the 519th to Tapioca Flats in Antwerp, Belgium where they remained until being inactivated on 3 October 1946.

 

Campaign Participation

World War II (embroidered Normandy) Streamers: Normandy (with arrowhead); Northern France; Rhineland.

Decorations

Meritorious Unit Commendation (embroidered European Theatre)

French Croix de Guerra with Silver Palm

Order of the Day of the Belgian Army for action at Antwerp



Monument dedicated to the men of the
1st Engineer Special Brigade
who were killed at
Utah Beach, Normandy
D-Day 6 June 1944



Korean War

 

The HHD, 55th Transportation Corps Truck Battalion was activated at Fort Eustis, Virginia, on 4 October 1948 and redesignated as the HHD, 55th Transportation Truck Battalion on 3 June 1949 with the 505th Transportation Truck Company an integral part of the battalion.

 

Early 1950 found the 55th Transportation Truck Battalion and its assigned units from Fort Eustis, Virginia aboard a troop train bound for Fort Lewis, Washington. It then shipped out to Yokohama, Japan, arriving in the middle of July. The soldiers of the battalion stayed at the North Dock motor pool in Yokohama where they waited on the arrival of unit equipment and vehicles coming in on various ships. After assembling, inspecting uploading combat equipment on their trucks, they shipped out to Korea landing at Inchon in the early hours of 16 September 1950 the day after the Marines had landed.

 

 After 2 days on the beach, the battalion proceeded to Kimpo Airfield, where it unloaded cargo planes and relayed the supplies to the front in support of IX Corps. It was in Seoul when Gen MacArthur and Korean President Rhee reclaimed the capitol.

 

IX Corps patch

The unit was involved in relaying cargo to the front when the Chinese attacked in December 1950. The trucks of the 55th then evacuated the 2nd Infantry Division running through a gauntlet of Chinese ambushes. It took the trucks of the 55th Battalion several trips to bring the 2nd Infantry Division back.

 

After their retreat the 55th Battalion went back as far south as Pusan to stage. As the front lines stabilized, the 55th advanced north and staged in various areas, among them Taegu, Taejon, and Wonju, this time moving both troops and supplies.

 

The 55th Battalion was inactivated in Japan on 25 March 1956, as was the 505th Transportation Truck Company.

 

Campaign Participation

Korean War:

UN Offensive,

CCF Intervention,

First UN Counter-Offensive,

CCF Spring Offensive,

UN Summer-fall Offensive,

Second Korean Winter,

Korea, Summer-fall 1952

Third Korean Winter,

Korea, Summer 1953

 

Decorations

Meritorious Unit Commendation, Streamer embroidered KOREA 1950-1951

Meritorious Unit Commendation, Streamer embroidered KOREA 1952

Meritorious Unit Commendation, Streamer embroidered KOREA 1953

Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation, Streamer embroidered KOREA

 


Project 572-W

 

On 1 February 1956 the unit was reactivated as the 519th Transportation Battalion (Terminal Service) at Fort Eustis, Virginia. It was assigned the mission of preparing various boat companies and terminal service companies for participation in Project 572-W (the supply of material for the construction of the DEW line in the Arctic). Its mission completed, the unit was inactivated on 15 December 1957 at Fort Eustis, Virginia.

 


Vietnam War

"The Tiger Battalion"


On 20 May 1966 the unit was again activated, this time at Fort George G. Meade, Maryland as the 519th
Transportation Battalion (Motor Transport). Filler personnel were assigned and began arriving in late May. The majority of officers and NCOs were returnees from Europe. The enlisted personnel, for the most part, were fresh out of basic training.

By early June, there was sufficient personnel on-hand to begin POR/POM (Preparation for Overseas Movement) training in preparation for deployment to the Republic of Vietnam.


The 519th Transportation Battalion adopted a tiger as its symbol, based on the dominant figure on its distinctive crest. Personnel from the battalion participated in the design of the distinctive crest which was approved by the Institute of Heraldry on 31 August 1966.


519th Transportation Battalion Crest

The insignia is a gold metal and enamel device, one and one eighth inches in height. It consists of a brick-red disk edged in gold with three battlements at the top. In the center is a - gold, black striped tiger's head in profile with jagged extremities.

The latter surmount a green wreath in base composed of laurel leaves on one side and palm in the other. On the base and sides of the gold rim is a tri-parted gold scroll inscribed "QUID", "QUANDO", "QUO" in black letters. The motto refers to the battalion's only query when assigned a mission: What is the job? When must the job be done? Where is the job?


During its own training phase, the battalion was assigned the responsibility of supervising the training of various Engineer, Quartermaster, Signal, and Transportation units for deployment to the Republic of Vietnam.

When orders arrived the unit had been diverted to the Kingdom of Thailand.

The US Army’s 519th Transportation Battalion was unique. Its location, mission and composition truly made it one of a kind among quartermaster and transportation units that comprise the US Army’s vast inventory.

Its location although in Southeast Asia during the 1960’s & 1970’s was not in the Republic of Vietnam. The unit operated in direct support of US combat air operations from bases within the Royal Kingdom of Thailand.

The battalions Line of Communication (LOC) was the entire central and northern sections of Thailand. The LOC used a highway net of some 1070 miles over varying road surface conditions.

From Sattahip (south of Bangkok) to Korat and Takhli to the north, the roads were primarily 2 lanes with hard surfaces.

Continuing north past Korat from Khon Kaen to Udorn, Sakorn Nakhon, Nakhorn Phanom and even west to Ubon was a mixture of hard surface and dirt roads.

The road surface conditions were very hard on the vehicles which placed them into a virtual constant state of repairs.

The battalion established a number of Trailer Transfer Points (TTP) at critical points along the Line of Communications (LOC).

The southern most TTP was at the ports in Sattahip (Vayama and Samae San).

At Camp Friendship in Korat was the 519th Motor Pool (HQ, 291st TC, 313th TC (Reefer) and later 33rd Reefer Plt) which doubled as a TTP.

The northern most TTP was located at Camp Khon Kaen with the a platoon of the 291st TC, then with the 569th TC.

Each TTP was staffed transportation control detachments and supported by units of the 519th TC Bn.

Although the battalion mission was to transport various types of cargo to various US military units in Thailand, "Project 972" was of extremely high priority.

Previously classified, “Project 972” consisted of sensitive explosives and/or listening devices (The McNamara Line of Defense) that were transported to the USAF so that aircraft could drop them over North Vietnam and Laos.

A serious problem faced by military commanders in Thailand was how to distribute dairy products in a timely manner. This was solved when the battalion employed a tactic of General Patton during the Second World War. Known as “Red Ball”, it was a method of expediting sensitive dairy products, so that they were delivered fresh each day.

The battalion was comprised of two types of transportation companies in Thailand  (Type-A & Type-B). Type-A units were comprised entirely of US military drivers. Type-B units were made up of both US Military and Thai civilian drivers. 


Type-A unit:

569th Transportation Company replaced the 291st platoon at Camp Khon Kaen.


Type-B units:

33rd Transportation Platoon (Reefer) replaced the 313th platoon at Camp Friendship in Korat,

53rd Transportation Company at Camp Vayama in Sattahip,

260th Transportation Company at Camp Samae San in Sattahip,

291st Transportation Company at Camp Friendship in Korat, and a platoon at Camp Khon Kaen,

313th Transportation Company at Bangkok, and a platoon at Camp Friendship in Korat, and

505th Transportation Company at Camp Vayama in Sattahip, with a platoon at Udorn RTAFB line hauling to NKP in 1967.


Although these companies came together under the 519th Transportation Battalion in Thailand, each of them has a distinctive and honored background, in some cases dating back prior to the Second World War.

Many of these units served with honor in Europe or in Asia, under combat conditions during the Second World War and/or the Korean War.


A special survey disclosed that the "Tiger Battalion" has the longest line of communication and largest mission of any battalion of its type in the world.


The following excerpts from an article originally published in the SUPTHAI Sentinel on 26 June 1970 by then Captain Gerald J. Sheehan, as well as historically documentation (Statements of Service) for each unit of the battalion provide a valuable, in-depth look at the 519th Transportation Battalion (Truck) and its subordinate units.

Advanced Party elements of the battalion (personnel and equipment) departed from Andrews Air Force Base on 10 December 1966 aboard C130s headed for the Kingdom of Thailand. The remainder of battalion personnel and equipment left on later flights to the west coast, where they were loaded aboard ship. Advanced party elements of the battalion completed its move and closed in Thailand on 17 December 1966. Setting up the battalion headquarters at Camp Charn Sinthope near Phanom Sarakham, southeast of Bangkok.

In February 1967 the headquarters moved to Camp Friendship in Northeastern Thailand, near the town of Nakorn Rachisima (Korat). They remained at Camp Friendship until September 1968, when they returned to Camp Charn Sinthope.

As the only transportation truck battalion in Thailand, the unit mission was the establishment and operation of a truck transportation system along its line of communication (LOC).

In August 1969 the battalion again relocated. This time to Camp Samae San, near the town of Sattahip where they remained until the unit was inactivated on 20 February 1971. For service in Thailand, 519th Transportation Battalion and it's subordinate units were awarded the Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) 16 December 1966 – 31 December 1969 - GO 308 dated 14 July 1970.

 

Decorations

Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army)

"The Tiger Battalion Commanders"

Activation 66 - 67
Commander - Lieutenant Colonel Harry F. Middleton

Command Sergeant Major James J. Milele
67 - 68
Commander - Lieutenant Colonel Jack J. Schwartz

Command Sergeant Major Robert A. Sommers
68 - 69
Commander - Lieutenant Colonel William H. Mantooth

Command Sergeant Major Robert B. Crawford
69 - 70
Commander - Lieutenant Colonel Robert L. Vidrick
Command Sergeant Major Hans Kleinschmidt
70 - Deactivation
Commander - Lieutenant Colonel David Hall

Command Sergeant Major Fischer


STATEMENTS OF SERVICE

The 519th Transportation Battalion (Motor Transport) (WFSQ_4993) - Constituted on 1 April 1943, and re-organized as Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 302nd, 303rd, 304th, and 305th Port Companies. It was activated on 25 June 1943 at Indiantown Gap Military Reservation, Pennsylvania as the 519th Port Battalion then embarked from Camp Miles Standish in Boston, Massachusetts aboard the E.P. Alexander to England. After a brief training period, the 519th Port Battalion participated in the invasion of Normandy, going ashore on 7 June 1944. It later moved from Normandy to Antwerp, Belgium on 14 November 1944, where it remained until being inactivated on 3 October 1946.

 

Activated on 1 February 1956, at Fort Eustis, Virginia, as the 519th Transportation Battalion (Terminal Service) and assigned the mission of preparing various boat companies and terminal service companies for participation in Project 572-W (the supply of material for the construction of the DEW line in the Arctic). Its mission completed, the unit was inactivated at Fort Eustis, Virginia on 15 December 1957.

 

Activated on 20 May 1966, at Fort George G. Meade, Maryland, as the 519th Transportation Battalion (Motor Transport) with the following subordinate units, Headquarters and Headquarters, 519th Transportation Battalion, 313th Transportation Company (Refrigerated), *572nd Transportation Company (Medium Truck Cargo), 291st Transportation Company (Medium Truck Cargo) and assigned the mission of preparing and training various Engineer, Quartermaster, Signal, and Transportation units for deployment to Vietnam. The unit received orders to Thailand in preparation for the movement of secret Operation 972 (Muscle Shoals) cargo within Thailand.

 

*After loading equipment at the port in Baltimore, Maryland personnel from the 572nd Transportation Company arrived at the port of San Francisco, California where they boarded the USNS General Alexander M. Patch for the 24-day cruise to the Republic of Vietnam on 6 October 1966.

 

On 10 December 1966 advance party elements (personnel and equipment) of the battalion departed from Andrews Air Force Base aboard C130s headed for Sattahip, Thailand. The unit completed the move on 17 December 1966, before moving north to Camp Charn Sinthope near Phanom Sarakham, southeast of Bangkok.

 

While in Thailand the battalion consisted of the following transportation assets, Headquarters and Headquarters, 519th Transportation Battalion, the 33rd Transportation Platoon (Reefer), the 53rd Transportation Company (Medium Truck Cargo), the 313th Transportation Company (Refrigerated), the 260th Transportation Company (Medium Truck Petroleum), the 291st Transportation Company (Medium Truck Cargo), w/attached 254th Transportation Detachment (Trailer Transfer Point Operating), the 505th Transportation Company (Medium Truck Cargo), and the 569th Transportation Company (Medium Truck Cargo).

 

Due to major re-construction efforts in 1968, the battalion temporarily relocated to Camp Friendship before returned to Camp Charn Sinthope where it remained until August 1969, before making its final move to Camp Samae San, in Sattahip where it was deactivated on 20 February 1971.

 

Campaign Participation Credit:

World War II (embroidered Normandy) Streamers: Normandy (with arrowhead); Northern France; Rhineland.

 

Decorations:

Meritorious Unit Commendation (embroidered European Theatre);

French Croix de Guerra with Silver Palm; Order of the Day of the Belgian Army for action at Antwerp;

Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) Streamer embroidered SOUTHEAST ASIA

 

 

 UNITS OF THE 519TH


The 33rdTransportation Platoon (Reefer) (WG16) – Constituted 10 May 1967 and activated on 25 August 1967 at Fort Lewis, Washington. Deployed to Thailand in 1968 and assigned to the 519th Transportation Battalion operating from Camp Friendship in Korat until the unit was inactivated on 1 April 1970.

Decorations:

Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) Streamer embroidered SOUTHEAST ASIA.

 

 

 

The 53rd Transportation Company (Medium Truck Cargo) (WCNU_3338) – The parent unit organized March 1943 as 2638th Quartermaster Truck Battalion (Provisional) in North Africa. The 54th Quartermaster Truck Battalion constituted on 28 May 1943 in the Army of the United States. On 7 July 1943 was re-designated as 54th Quartermaster Truck Battalion. Company C reorganized and re-designated on 3 November 1943 as 3355th Quartermaster Truck Company. Concurrently, the remainder of the battalion reorganized and re-designated as follows: Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment as Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 54th Quartermaster Battalion (Mobile). Companies A, B, & D as 3353rd, 3354th, & 3356th Quartermaster Truck Companies, respectively with separate lineages. On 12 April 1946 the 3355th Quartermaster Truck Company inactivated at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey. On 1 August 1946 converted and re-designated as the 3355th Transportation Corps Truck Company. Re-designated as the 103rd Transportation Truck Company and allotted to the Regular Army on 1 September 1948. First activated on 10 September 1948, then inactivated on 15 December 1948 at Fort Lewis, Washington. On 1 June 1949 activated at Fort McKinley in the Philippine Islands, then inactivated on 22 July 1949 at Fort Stotensburg in the Philippine Islands. Re-designated as the 53rd Transportation Heavy Truck Company on 12 September 1952, and activated on 25 October 1952 at Camp Roberts, California. Participated in Operation Desert Rock in Nevada. On 20 June 1953, re-designated 53rd Transportation Company and participated in Operation Fort Irwin in California on 30 June 1953. Participated in Operation Fort Irwin in California on 1 August 1961. Assigned to Okinawa on 24 September 1965, then reassigned to the 519th Transportation Battalion on 10 April 1967 serving at Camp Vayama until being inactivated on 30 December 1970 in Thailand.

Campaign Participation Credit:

World War II-EAME, North Africa, Sicily, Italy, France, Belgium, Antwerp "St Albans Victory"

 

Decorations:

Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) Streamer embroidered SOUTHEAST ASIA

 

 

 

The 254th Transportation Detachment (Trailer Transfer Point Operating) – Organized at full TOE and arrived in Thailand on 30 November 1967 from Fort Lewis, Washington and split into three teams and stationed at Camp Charn Srithope in Phanom Sarakham, Camp Friendship in Korat, and Camp Khon Kaen. The platoon headquarters was at Camp Friendship and attached to the 291st Transportation Company, of the 519th Transportation Battalion.

 

The 260th Transportation Company (Medium Truck Petroleum) (WFSS_5201) – Constituted in July 1923 in the Organized Reserves as the 935th Motor Transport Company. Re-designated as Company K, 513th Quartermaster Truck Regiment on 1 July 1936 then activated as D, 513th Quartermaster Truck Regiment on 1 April 1943 at Fort Custer, Michigan. Reorganized and re-designated as the 3890th Quartermaster Truck Company on 15 December 1943 and inactivated in France on 25 June 1946. On 1 August 1946, converted and re-designated as the 3890th Transportation Corps Truck Company. On 13 February 1948, re-designated as the 260th Transportation Company and activated on 1 March 1948 at Fort Myer, Virginia. On 25 March 1948, Organized Reserves re-designated as the Organized Reserve Corps, then on 9 July 1952 as the Army Reserve. On 9 August 1960 inactivated at Fort Myer, Virginia. Withdrawn on 23 March 1966 from the Army Reserve and allotted to the Regular Army; concurrently re-designated as the 260th Transportation Company and activated on 1 June 1966 at Fort Riley, Kansas and deployed to Thailand where they were initially attached to the 499th Transportation Battalion (Terminal Service) at Camp Vayama, Sattahip. On 6 February 1967 the 260th Transportation Company began training as a dump truck company with the 809th Engineer Battalion (CON), 44th Engineer Group (CON) at Camp Charn Srithope in Phanom Sarakham. In December 1966, the 260th Transportation Company was reassigned to the 519th Transportation Battalion and operated as a transportation cargo company. In 1968 the unit relocated to Camp Friendship in Korat. In 1969 the 260th Transportation Company (Petroleum) relocated to Camp Samae San in Sattahip where they assumed their petroleum transport duties, as well as transporting general cargo until being inactivated in Thailand on 31 October 1975.

Campaign Participation Credit:

World War II-EAME, Northern France, Rhineland, Central Europe

Decorations:

Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) Streamer embroidered SOUTHEAST ASIA

 

 

 

The 291st Transportation Company (Medium Truck Cargo) (WDZG_5548) – Constituted on 10 November 1942 as D, 467th Quartermaster Truck Regiment and activated at Fort Custer, Michigan on 10 December 1942. Reorganized and re-designated as the 3622nd Quartermaster Truck Company on 16 December 1943, and inactivated in France on 25 June 1946. On 1 August 1946, converted and re-designated as the 3622nd Transportation Corps Truck Company.  Re-designated as the 291st Transportation Amphibious Truck Company on 13 January 1948 and allotted to the Organized Reserves. Activated on 22 January 1948 at Portland, Maine. On 25 March 1948, Organized Reserves re-designated as the Organized Reserve Corps, then on 9 July 1952 as the Army Reserve. On 1 February 1950 inactivated at Portland, Maine. Withdrawn on 1 October 1966 from the Army Reserve and allotted to the Regular Army; concurrently re-designated as the 291st Transportation Company and activated at Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. On 30 June 1971 inactivated at Camp Samae San, Thailand.

Campaign Participation Credit:

World War II-EAME, Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Central Europe

Decorations:

Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) Streamer embroidered SOUTHEAST ASIA

 

 

 

 

The 313th Transportation Company (Medium Truck Refrigeration) (WFQ6-4982) – Constituted on 9 April 1943 as D, 510th Port Battalion and activated on 15 July 1943 at Indiantown Gap Military Reservation, Pennsylvania as 313th Port Company. On 30 June 1946 inactivated in the Philippine Islands, then re-designated on 13 June 1947 as the 313th Transportation Port Company and allotted to the Organized Reserves. On 21 June 1947 activated at New York, New York. On 25 March 1948, Organized Reserves re-designated as the Organized Reserve Corps, then on 9 July 1952 as the Army Reserve. Ordered into active military service on 11 September 1950 at New York, New York; released from active military service on 15 September 1954 reverting back to reserve status. On 15 November 1954 reorganized and re-designated as the 313th Transportation Company and inactivated on 15 May 1959 at New York, New York. Withdrawn on 23 March 1966 from the Army Reserve and allotted to the Regular Army. On 20 May 1966 activated at Fort George G. Meade, Maryland and deployed to Thailand, where they were initially assigned to the 499th Transportation Battalion (Terminal Service) and attached for rations and quarters to the 809th Engineer Battalion at Camp Charn Srithope, Sattahip. In December 1966 they were reassigned to the 519th Transportation Battalion (CGO) and relocated to Camp Friendship in Korat, with one platoon rotating to Bangkok for cold storage. They were inactivated at Camp Samae San, Thailand on 31 March 1972.

Campaign Participation Credit:

World War II-AP, Bismarck Archipelago, Luzon, Southern Philippines

Decorations:

Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) Streamer embroidered SOUTHEAST ASIA

 

 

 

 

The 505th Transportation Company (Medium Truck Cargo) (WCPAAAA) – Constituted on 26 November 1943 as 3640th Quartermaster Truck Company, activated on 10 December 1943 and inactivated on 8 September 1945 in Italy. Converted and re-designated on 1 August 1946 as the 3649th Transportation Corps Truck Company concurrently activated at Fort Riley, Kansas. On 7 March 1947 re-designated as the 505th Transportation Corps Truck Company and re-designated on 15 July 1947 as the 505th Transportation Truck Company. On 5 January 1949 allotted to the Regular Army. On 1 April 1954, reorganized and re-designated as the 505th Transportation Company, then inactivated in Japan on 25 March 1956. On 23 May 1957 activated at Fort Benning, Georgia and deployed to Thailand, arriving on 11 November 1966, where they were initially attached to the 499th Transportation Battalion (Terminal Service) at Camp Vayama, Sattahip. In December 1966 they were assigned to the 519th Transportation Battalion (CGO) and remained at Camp Vayama, Sattahip until inactivated in Thailand on 30 December 1971. On 20 September 1990 activated, then inactivated in Korea on 17 March 1991.

Campaign Participation Credit:

World War II-EAME, Naples-Foggia, Rome-Arno, North Apennines, Po Valley

Korean War: UN Offensive, CCF Intervention, First UN Counteroffensive, CCF Spring Offensive, UN Summer-Fall Offensive, Second Korean Winter, Korea, Summer-Fall 1952, Third Korean Winter, Korea, Summer 1953

Decorations:

Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) Streamer embroidered EUROPEAN THEATER; KOREA; SOUTHEAST ASIA

 

 

 

 

The 569th Transportation Company (Medium Truck Cargo) (WDT3AAA) – Constituted on 1 January 1942 as D. 399th Quartermaster Battalion. On 10 February 1942 activated at the San Francisco Port of Embarkation, California. On 31 July 1942 converted and re-designated as D. 399th Port Battalion, Transportation Corps then reorganized and re-designated as the 569th Port Company on 25 January 1944 and inactivated on 17 September 1945 at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey. Re-designated on 5 January 1955 as the 569th Transportation Company and allotted to the Regular Army.  First activated on 24 February 1955 and inactivated on 15 December 1958 at Fort Eustis, Virginia. Next activated on 25 June 1950, then inactivated on 25 March 1963 at Camp Leroy Johnson, Louisiana. On 1 May 1967, activated at Fort George G. Meade, Maryland and deployed to Thailand, was assigned to the 519th Transportation Battalion (CGO) and stationed and later inactivated at Camp Khon Kaen, Thailand on 1 April 1970.

Campaign Participation Credit:

World War II-EAME, Algeria-French Morocco, Rome-Arno, Southern France, Rhineland

Decorations:

Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) Streamer embroidered SOUTHEAST ASIA